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McMahon publishes paper in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice

Doherty Emerging Professor of Entrepreneurship Sean McMahon researched entrepreneurial coachability and its influence on a potential investor.

Sean McMahon, Doherty Emerging Professor of Entrepreneurship, studied entrepreneurs’ levels of coachability and developed a theoretical framework that establishes coachability as a factor in new venture funding.

Doherty Emerging Professor of Entrepreneurship Sean McMahon

The paper was first published in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice on Sept. 26.

McMahon co-authored this paper with:

  • Michael Ciuchta, assistant professor of management at The University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Chaim Letwin, assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship at Suffolk University Boston
  • Regan Stevenson, assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship at Indiana University
  • M. Nesij Huvaj, assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship at Suffolk University Boston

The researchers found that perceptions of agreeableness were positively associated with perceptions of coachability and that neuroticism was negatively associated with it. They also found that openness to experience, rather than conscientiousness, is associated with coachability. These findings add to the limited literature in the field about this concept.

McMahon joined Elon in 2013. His research has been published in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, Applied Psychology, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. He is the founder of Knowtro.com, an open platform that makes complex research easy to find, cite and use. Previously, McMahon co-founded Jaywalk, a platform for unbiased investment research that was acquired by The Bank of New York in 2002.

Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice is a leading journal in the entrepreneurship field. The journal aims to publish papers that contribute to the field of entrepreneurship. The journal publishes articles of interest to scholars, consultants, and public policymakers. 

Caroline Perry ,
Student
11/2/2017 10:05 AM