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Carpenter, Justice and Morrison publish articles in Learning Landscapes journal

Jeffrey Carpenter, associate professor of education and director of the Teaching Fellows program, Julie Justice, assistant professor of education, and Scott Morrison, assistant professor of education, published articles in the journal Learning Landscapes.

Jeffrey Carpenter, associate professor of education and director of the Teaching Fellows program, and Julie Justice, assistant professor of education, published an article titled "Can Technology Support Teaching for Global Readiness? The Case of the Global Read Aloud" in the peer-reviewed journal Learning Landscapes. The article abstract reads as follows:

From left, Jeffrey Carpenter, Julie Justice and Scott Morrison

"Technology can create new opportunities for learning with and from people of other cultures, not just about them. The Global Read Aloud (GRA) offers an example of such learning possibilities. The GRA is a project that connects classrooms via digital technologies to discuss common texts. This research explored the pedagogical opportunities and challenges associated with using technology to teach for global readiness in the GRA. Although technology broadened how and with whom GRA students read and discussed literature, the depth and quality of technology-facilitated teaching specifically for global readiness was somewhat unclear. We discuss implications for teaching for global readiness."

The full article can be found here, and its citation is as follows:

Carpenter, J. P., & Justice, J. E. (2017). Can technology support teaching for global readiness?: The case of the Global Read Aloud. Learning Landscapes, 11(1), 65-85.

Carpenter, Scott Morrison, assistant professor of education, and co-authors Michael Cook of Auburn University and Brandon Sams of Iowa State University, published an article in the same issue of the journal, titled "'Why Haven’t I Tried Twitter Until Now?': Using Twitter in Teacher Education The article abstract reads as follows:

"As teacher educators, we have used Twitter with the goal of jumpstarting the professional learning networks and teacher identity development of students in our courses and programs. Our use of Twitter has evolved over time and can inform the work of other teacher educators. In this article, we offer examples of the benefits of incorporating Twitter in teacher education. We describe some of the common challenges we have experienced at our two institutions and across multiple semesters of use. Based on our collective experiences, we offer recommendations to others who are using or are considering using Twitter with preservice teachers."

The full article can be found here, and its citation is as follows:

Carpenter, J. P., Cook, M. P., Morrison, S. A., & Sams, B. L. (2017). “Why haven’t I tried Twitter until now?”: Using Twitter in teacher education. Learning Landscapes, 11(1), 51-64.

 

Jeff Carpenter,
Faculty
1/30/2018 9:10 AM