David Vandermast

Associate Professor of Biology
McMichael Science Building 124B
2625 Campus Box
Elon, NC 27244
dvandermast@elon.edu (336) 278-6171

Education

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ph.D. Biology

Clemson University, MS Forestry.

Clemson University, BS Forest Resources

Ohio University, BBA, Finance

Employment History

I was a banker, then I became a biologist.

Courses Taught

Biodiversity Bio 231

Dendrology Bio 377

Population Biology Bio 112/114

Introductory Seminar Bio 261

Intro to Environmental Science ENS 111/113

Plants and Civilization GST 314W

Leadership Positions

I am the past (2010-2012) and current (2012-2014) Chair of the Southeast Chapter of the Ecological Society of America.

I am the current Faculty Fellow for the Residential Campus at Elon.

Research

I am a plant ecologist and my research seeks to understand pattern and process in ecological communities. I have research in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, along the Haw River in the North Carolina Piedmont, and in Elon Forest and other areas near Elon.

Below is a list of projects students have worked on with me at Elon:

  • Effects of the winter storm of 2014 on composition and structure of Elon University Forest
  • American beech sprount survivorship in Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Environmental correlates of forest structure and composition on Elon University Forest
  • Wintertime photosynthetic activity in semi-evergreen invasive species
  • Tree mortality and replacement in Elon University Forest
  • Effects of beaver herbivory on invasive species establishment on the Haw River
  • Effects of beaver herbivory on forest composition along the Haw River
  • Assessment of invasive plant species on Elon University Forest
  • Kudzu management on Elon University Forest
  • Seed longevity of eastern forest trees
  • Geographical range and allelopathy in American beech trees
  • Biological resources of Elon University Forest
  • Diversity and abundance of bark epiphytes in high-elevation beech forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Ecological variation in the concentration of podophyllotoxin in mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum)
  • Effect of two introduced disturbances, European wild boar (Sus scrofa) and beech bark disease, on the vernal flora of high-elevation beech forests in Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Composition and structure of Haw River riparian forests: importance of the soil seed bank
  • Spatial dimensions of plant invasion of Haw River floodplain forests
  • Flame atomic absorption analysis of tree cores collected from high-elevation hardwood forests in Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Experimental shading of a wintergreen plant, Crane-fly orchid (Tipularia discolor)
  • Changes in spring ephemeral emergence and density due beech bark disease
  • Temporal changes in the high-elevation deciduous forests of western Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Patterns of woody succession in high-elevation beech forests affected by beech bark disease
  • The effects of hog rooting on plant biodiversity in the high-elevation beech forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Maintenance of beech dominance in high-elevation beech gaps: could allelopathy be a cause?
  • Analysis of the vegetative composition of hog-exclosures and control plots in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
  • Biotic and environmental factors associated with invasive species success in Battle Park, Chapel Hill, N.C.
  • Community diversity and habitat preference of medicinal plants in the Piedmont of North Carolina.

Publications

Browning, K. and D.B. Vandermast.  Beech bark disease reduces feral hog (Sus scrofa) rooting in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Submitted.

Poteat, M. and D.B. Vandermast.  2010.  On the scarcity of red spruce (Picea rubens) and Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) in the beech gaps of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Journal of the North Carolina Academy of Science 76(3): 98-104.

Vandermast, D.B.  2008.  Book Review of American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree by Susan Freinkel.  American Scientist 96: 345-346.

Drake, J.M., E.E. Cleland, M.C. Horner-Devine, E. Fleischman, C. Bowles, M.D. Smith, K. Carney, S. Emery, J. Gramling, D.B. Vandermast, J.B. Grace.  2008.  Do non-native plant species affect the shape of productivity-diversity relationships?  American Midland Naturalist 159:55-66.

Fridley, J.D., D.B. Vandermast, D. Kuppinger, M. Manthey and  R.K. Peet.  2007.  On the measure of niche width: a co-occurrence based assessment of habitat generalists and specialists for trees of the Southeastern United States.  Journal of Ecology 95(4): 707-722.

Cleland E.E., M.D. Smith, S.J. Andelman, C. Bowles, K. Carney, M.C. Horner-Devine, J. Drake, S. Emery, J. Gramling, D.B. Vandermast.  2004.  Invasion in space and time: non-native species richness and relative abundance respond to interannual variation in productivity and diversity.  Ecology Letters 7:947-957.

Vandermast, D.B., C.E. Moorman, K.R. Russell, D.H. Van Lear.  2004.  Initial vegetative response to prescribed fire in some oak-hickory forests of the South Carolina Piedmont.  Natural Areas Journal 24(3):216-222.

Vandermast, D.B., D.H. Van Lear, and B.D. Clinton.  2002.  American chestnut as an allelopath in the southern Appalachians.  Forest Ecology and Management 165 (1-3): 173-181.

Vandermast, D.B. and D.H. Van Lear. 2002. Riparian vegetation in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA) following chestnut blight. Forest Ecology and Management 155(1): 97-106.

Giencke, L., S. Keith, C.A. McCormick, A. Weakley, D.B. Vandermast, and P.S. White.  2010 (in print).  Conservation Plan for Battle Park. North Carolina Botanical Garden, 359 pp.

Vandermast, D.B.  2005.  Disturbance and long-term vegetation change in the high-elevation deciduous forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Ph.D. Dissertation, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.  209 pp.

Vandermast, D.B.  2004.  Seeing the Forest for the Trees.  Great Smoky Mountains National Park Resource Management Newsletter 232, September 21, 2004.

Van Lear, D.H.; Vandermast, D.B.; Rivers, C.T.; Baker, T.T.; Hedman, C.W.; Clinton, B.D.; Waldrop, T.A. 2002. American Chestnut, Rhododendron, and the Future Of Appalachian Cove Forests Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Pp. 214-220.

Vandermast, D.B., and D.H. Van Lear.  1999.  Vegetative composition of riparian forest once dominated by American chestnut.  General Technical Report SRS-30.  Asheville, N.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station, 1999.

Parke, R. and D.B. Vandermast. 1999.  American chestnut: The continuing story.  Wild Earth 9(2): 23-27.

Vandermast, D.B. 1999. Antipredator behavior of Elaphe obsoletaHerpetological Review 30(3): 169.

Vandermast, D.B. 1999. Riparian forest recovery in the southern Appalachians following the chestnut blight.  M.S. Thesis, Clemson University, Clemson, S.C. 96 pp.

 

Presentations

Fabrycki, M. and D. Vandermast.  2014. Patterns of sapling abundance support the presence of a “forest of continuity” on Elon University Forest.  75th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Spartanburg, S.C.

Pieciak, J. and D. Vandermast.  2014.  A comparison of seed longevity of eastern tree species in seeds of varying ages.  75th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Spartanburg, S.C.

Wollman, W. and D. Vandermast  2013. Beaver-caused tree mortality and the establishment of invasive plant species along the Haw River. 74th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Kelly, J. and D. Vandermast.  2013. Effects of beaver herbivory on forest composition along the Haw River, central Piedmont of North Carolina.  74th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Abel, L. and D. Vandermast.  2013. Assessment of invasive plant species threat on Elon University Forest.  74th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Jacobs, C. and D. Vandermast.  2013. Control of Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) on Elon University Forest. 74th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Neidhardt, E. and D. Vandermast. 2013.  Geographic variation in the allelopathic potential of American beech (Fagus grandifolia).  74th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Ma, P*, R. Kirk, and D. Vandermast.  2012.  Land-use history and the composition and structure of Elon University Forest, a successional hardwood forest in the North Carolina Piedmont.  73rd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Browning, K*, and D. Vandermast.  2012.  An interaction between European wild boar (Sus scrofa)  and beech bark disease in the high-elevation beech gaps of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  73rd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Hayleck, M*, and D. Vandermast.  2012.  Impact of beech bark disease on epiphyte diversity and cover in high-elevation beech gaps in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  73rd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Hoopes, S*, and D. Vandermast.  2012.  The effect of geographic range and seasonality on concentration of podophyllotoxin in Podophyllum peltatum.  73rd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Sigmon, L*, and D. Vandermast.  2012.  Composition of the soil seedbank in a highly altered riparian forest in the central Piedmont of North Carolina.  73rd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Athens, GA.

Salpeter, K*, P. Ma*, and D. Vandermast. 2011.  Evidence for biotic resistance to invasion across spatial scales in riparian forest vegetation.  72nd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Huntsville, AL.

Sigmon, L*, P. Ma*, and D. Vandermast.  2011.  The structure and composition of deciduous riparian buffers along the Haw River. 72nd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Huntsville, AL.

Furniss, J*, and D. Vandermast.  2011.  Atmospheric pollution and tree core chemistry in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  72nd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Huntsville, AL.

Matson, S*, and D. Vandermast.  2011.  Effects of experimental shading on a wintergreen perennial, Crane-fly orchid (Tipularia discolor) in the Piedmont of North Carolina.  72nd Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Huntsville, AL.

Sigmon*, Lora, Patrick Ma*, and D. Vandermast.  2011.  The structure and composition of deciduous riparian buffers along the Haw River.  2011 North Carolina Academy of Sciences annual meeting, Elon, NC.

Vandermast, D.  2010.  Twenty-four years (1985-2009) of demographic changes in the high-elevation beech forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  71st Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Asheville, NC.

Poteat*, Monica, and D. Vandermast.  2010.  Inhibition of germination and growth as an explanation for the scarcity of red spruce (Picea rubens) and Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) in the beech gaps of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  71st Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Asheville, NC.

Galliher*, Sarah, and D. Vandermast.  2010.  The effect of beech bark disease on the abundance and diversity of spring ephemeral herbs in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  71st Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Asheville, NC.

Roberts*, Julia, and D. Vandermast.  2009.  The composition and structure of beech gaps in Great Smoky Mountains National Park 15 years after beech bark disease infestation.  70th annual meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Birmingham, AL.

Galliher*, Sarah and D. Vandermast.  2009.  Effects of Beech Bark Disease on Regeneration of High Elevation Beech Forests in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  70th annual meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Birmingham, AL.

Kay*, Alexandra, and D. Vandermast.  2009.  30 years of European wild boar (Sus scrofa) rooting on herbaceous plant diversity in beech gap forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  70th annual meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Birmingham, AL.

Vandermast, D.B. 2008.  Temporal trends in diameter, basal area, and aboveground biomass in the high-elevation beech forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Great Smoky Mountains National Park Science Colloquium, Gatlinburg, TN. (invited presentation)

Corbyons*, Caroline, and David Vandermast.  2007.  Biotic resistance to invasion across spatial scales: does evidence from North Carolina Piedmont forests support theory? 68th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Columbia, SC.

Iacarella*, Lucas, and David Vandermast.  2007.  Does North Carolina contain a cornucopia of medicinal plants?  68th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Columbia, SC.

Vandermast, D.B., M.A. Jenkins, and P.S. White.  2004.  Tree population and community change over 25 years in the high-elevation deciduous forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina and Tennessee.  89th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Portland, OR.

Vandermast, D.B., M.A. Jenkins, and P.S. White.  2004.  Soil chemical and environmental correlates of long-term vegetation change in the high-elevation hardwood forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  65th Annual Meeting of Southeastern Biologists, Memphis, TN.

Vandermast, D.B., J.D. Fridley, D. Kuppinger and R.K. Peet.  2003.  Assessment of species habitat specialization of Southeastern trees using large-extent co-occurrence data.  88th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Savannah, GA.

Fridley, J.D, J. Gramling, T. Jobe, J.A. Kaplan, M. McKnight, A. Senft, D.B.  Vandermast, and R.K. Peet.  2003.  Fine-scale species-area relationships of the vascular flora of the Southeast.  88th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Savannah, GA.

Vandermast, D.B. and P.S. White.  2003.  Long-term vegetation change in high-elevation beech forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Abstracts of the 64th Annual Meeting of Southeastern Biologists, Washington, DC. Southeastern Biology 50:166.

Vandermast, D.B.  2002.  Effects of an introduced pathogen in a monodominant forest: beech bark disease in high-elevation beech forests of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Abstracts of the 63rd Annual Meeting of Southeastern Biologists, Boone, NC. Southeastern Biology 49:212.

Vandermast, D.B. and D.H. Van Lear. 1999.  Riparian forest recovery in the southern Appalachians following chestnut blight.  Proceedings of the 2nd Annual Forest Ecology Seminar, Orono, ME.

Vandermast, D.B. and D.H. Van Lear. 1999. Vegetative composition of riparian forest once dominated by American chestnut.  Proceedings of the 10th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Shreveport, LA.