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Kevin Kline ’09 presents Emmy Award to School of Communications

The managing editor at KXAN in Austin, Texas, was recognized at the 13th annual Lone Star Emmy Awards Show for his in-depth program focused on women's health rights and abortion.

Kevin Kline ’09 (right) presents his 2015 Emmy Award to Communications Dean Paul Parsons during his Nov. 30 campus visit. The award is on display in the lobby of McEwen Communications Building.

​Three weeks after collecting his third career regional Emmy Award, Kevin Kline ’09 presented his most recent honor to his alma mater.

A managing editor at KXAN in Austin, Texas, Kline visited the School of Communications on Nov. 30 and donated his Emmy Award for producing “State of Texas: In-depth – Women's Health Debate,” considered the state’s best political special program. The recognized program highlighted the continuing debate in Texas surrounding women’s health and abortion.

Kline’s Emmy statue, which he received on Nov. 7 at the 13th annual Lone Star Emmy Awards Show, is now on display in the lobby of McEwen Communications Building.

A broadcast journalism graduate, Kline worked on “State of Texas: In-Depth” with KXAN colleagues Josh Hinkle and Ed Zavala. Earlier this year, Kline and Hinkle also won the prestigious Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Television Political Journalism.

A managing editor at KXAN in Austin, Texas, Kline shared stories about his career in television with Associate Professor Anthony Hatcher’s “Journalism in a Free Society” class.

​In addition to meeting with Communications Dean Paul Parsons during his campus visit, Kline also spoke to Associate Professor Anthony Hatcher’s “Journalism in a Free Society” class, detailing his time at Elon and his career path since graduation.

During his half-hour lecture, the former news director of then-Phoenix14News (now Elon Local News) addressed his interest in politics, the demographics of the Austin market, his strategies for connecting with television viewers, and the importance of student media experience.

“Having the opportunity to do student media, it makes the biggest difference,” Kline said. “It allows you to get the practical experience that you need before entering the real world. You can make mistakes and learn from them here.”

Kline also noted the impact quality journalism can have on a community, mentioning a recent KXAN investigation that discovered Department of Public Safety troopers across Texas were inaccurately reporting the race of minority drivers. Less than two weeks after the story aired, the state made a policy change to correct the misreporting, Kline said.

Tommy Kopetskie,
Staff
12/1/2015 9:55 AM