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Kesgin publishes two journal articles on political leaders and foreign policy making

Two manuscripts on political leaders and foreign policy making by Baris Kesgin, assistant professor of political science, and his co-authors were recently published in the Journal of International Relations and Development and Political Psychology.

Two manuscripts on political leaders and foreign policy making by Baris Kesgin, assistant professor of political science at Elon, and his co-authors were recently published in the Journal of International Relations & Development and Political Psychology. In both papers, Kesgin and his colleagues examine the influence of characteristics of political leaders on foreign policy with case studies from Turkey. 

Baris Kesgin, assistant professor of political science and policy studies

In “Examining Leaders’ Orientations to Structural Constraints: Turkey’s 1991 and 2003 Iraq War Decisions,” the authors look at why Turkey enthusiastically supported the 1991 Persian Gulf War, but declined to actively involve in the 2003 Iraq War. This paper investigates how two different Turkish leaders (Turgut Ozal in 1991, and Recep Tayyip Erdogan in 2003) interpret the world and, most specifically, the status of the United States in world politics. The authors claim that the traits of the Turkish leaders explain different outcomes. The Journal of International Relations and Development is a widely-read, international peer-reviewed journal.

Kesgin and coauthors' second article “Personality or Role? Comparisons of Turkish Leaders Across Different Institutional Positions” is a significant contribution to leadership studies for its problematization of change and stability in personality traits in different political offices. The authors’ research on three Turkish politicians (Suleyman Demirel, Abdullah Gul, and Turgut Ozal) as prime ministers and presidents suggest relative stability in personality traits. The paper points at venues to further explore the interaction between personality and political contexts. Political Psychology is the premier, peer-reviewed journal in the interdisciplinary field of political psychology.

Kesgin has been collaborating with Esra Cuhadar of Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey, Juliet Kaarbo of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, and Binnur Ozkececi-Taner of Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota, in recent years. The authors are scheduled to deliver a new manuscript on the evolution of Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s leadership traits at the International Society of Political Psychology annual convention in Edinburgh in June. At the convention, Kesgin will serve as the co-chair for the section on Leadership and Political Personality. 

Melissa McBane,
Staff
3/6/2017 10:25 AM