THE PRESENCE OF PROGRAMMING DIVERSITY IN COLLEGE RADIO AT HISTORICALLY BLACK, WOMEN’S, AND NATIVE AMERICAN COLLEGES IN THE UNITED STATES
Montesia C. Deas and Monica R. Salvo
(Dr. Constance Book) School of Communications

The United States has 165 successful women’s, Native American, and Historically Black Colleges (HBC) in cities across the United States. As the radio market has concentrated commercially, diversity of ownership has declined (FCC, 2006). This study sought to determine if non-commercial campus radio stations operated by colleges with diverse markets added to the overall diversity of radio programmining in the United States. Of the 165 schools, HBC schools were the most likely to operate campus radio stations (73%) and most had an urban contemporary format, suggesting they catered to an African American market. Most of the HBC schools were located in communities without a commercial urban contemporary station, suggesting that in the absence of commercial alternatives, the college was providing a unique alternative. Campus radio stations were present in just under half (46%) of womens college and were not significantly likely to carry programming that catered to women. Instead, these campus radio stations were most likely to carry alternative music. American Indian colleges were the least likely to have college radio stations (13%). These colleges were significantly more likely to carry public affairs programming, suggesting that the radio station played an important role in creating community dialog that might be absent in mainstream media.

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