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Course Information

Spring Program

  • Students will choose from a variety of 2- and 4-credit courses in Production, Acting, Business, Art History and Writing.
  • Students will take a minimum of 12 credit hours and a maximum of 18, including an internship course.
  • Classes range from 3-4 hours and will be held all day on Monday and Tuesday evenings.

Elon in LA Spring 2013 Courses

COM 375 Entertainment Production (4 Credits)— Monday 9 a.m. to noon or Tuesday 9 a.m. to noon
Entertainment Production –? This course will use projects to enhance storytelling techniques through several visual media. Students will be responsible for producing an online blog and completing weekly production projects. Students will also be exposed to various methods of acting, acting instruction and the casting process. At the conclusion, students will produce "reel level" material for their professional portfolios. Prerequisite: COM220.

THE 320 Special Topics: Acting for the Camera (4 Credits) — Monday 2-5 p.m.
Acting for the Camera –This class will focus on the demands presented to an actor in Hollywood and how the creative process intersects with the business practices in the entertainment industry. It will serve as a general introduction to common practices and processes that are generally accepted in the industry with an emphasis on the actor's role in the filmmaking process and in the television industry. This is an intensive, professionally oriented class, preparing actors for auditioning and acting on camera. The three major areas of focus are: 1) Developing your acting technique by bringing an in-depth personalization to the work 2) Making the transition from acting on stage to acting for the camera 3) Understanding the first demand of camera acting—coming to terms with and understanding your specific "actor type" and learning to present yourself accordingly. Material will include a stage monologue (from a contemporary realistic play) that will be adjusted for the camera, an "open scene" and film and television scripts.

COM 400 Media Law and Ethics (4 Credits)— Monday 7-10 p.m.
The First Amendment is the philosophical foundation for freedom of speech and press in America. This course distinguishes between forms of communication that have constitutional protection and those with limitations (libel, privacy, copyright, censorship, commercial speech, broadcast licensing, access to information). Students explore the foundations of moral reasoning and apply ethical responsibilities to communications cases.

ART 370 Special Topics: Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (4 Credits)— Tuesday 7-10 p.m.
Students taking this course will learn about the contemporary art scene in Los Angeles. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, the course could include a look back to the openings of the Ferus Gallery and Womanhouse, an examination of the roles played by Eli Broad and Jeffrey Deitch in more recent years or both as bookends to 50 years of singular and ambivalent LA art making, patronage and display. Art forms covered may include pop, performance, video, installation, conceptual, graffiti/street and digital/new media. Engaged, attentive visits to museums and galleries will be an important part of this class, as will learning to recognize and put in context the art and institutions studied. No prerequisites.

COM 381-LA Communications Internship (2-4 Credits)
COM 381 is an off-campus, professionally supervised internship in journalism, strategic communications, media arts & entertainment or communication science. Students secure an internship with guidance from the Elon in LA staff. An internship involves enhancement of a student portfolio/demo reel, reflection assignments and supervisor evaluations. Prerequisite: approval of the internship director for LA. A maximum of 4 credit hours can be applied toward the major. Two credits is needed for the School of Communications’ internship requirement.

DAN 320 US Special Topics in Dance: Dance for the Camera (4 Credits)
This course will touch upon the history of Dance for the Camera along with current trends on a global scale. Students will experience both pre and post-production of dance films including: storyboarding, choreographing for the camera, set design, camera work, sound design, and editing. Weekly “shoot and share” projects will take place in and out of the classroom. Students will have the opportunity to complete interdisciplinary projects with other Elon in L.A. participants in Entertainment Public Relations and Entertainment Production courses. There will be opportunities to attend Dance/Cinema performances in L.A. and meet with film and dance professionals. Upon completion of the course, students will write a final project proposal and produce a professional level dance film for the end ofsummer screening.

Summer Program

Classes will be held on Mondays of every week. Students should not schedule any other activities for these days from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Absences from Monday classes will result in a reduction of students' class grades, as per their individual class syllabi.

Students receive six credits:

  • 2 credits for an internship class
  • 4 credits for the upper level COM elective

Elon in Los Angeles offer three class options that are co-requisite, meaning students will collaborate on projects while also receiving specialized instruction in one of the three areas of study:

Entertainment Production – taught by Elon in LA Program Coordinator J. McMerty
This course will use projects to enhance storytelling techniques through several visual media. Students will be responsible for producing an online blog and completing weekly production projects. Students will also be exposed to various methods of acting, acting instruction and the casting process. At the conclusion, students will produce “reel level” material for their professional portfolios. Prerequisite: COM220.

Entertainment Public Relations and Events – led by Hollywood PR veteran Brad Lemack
This course focuses on creating effective publicity for creative artists in a variety of entertainment fields, such as music, art, film, sports and entertainment. Using traditional and emerging media public relations theory, students will analyze publicity strategies for film, television, music and live theatrical events, and develop case histories and examine the inner workings of the entertainment side of the public relations business. This course includes in-class assignments, writing projects and guest speakers.

Acting for the Camera – led by actress Marilyn McIntyre
This class will focus on the demands presented to an actor in Hollywood and how the creative process intersects with the business practices in the entertainment industry. It will serve as a general introduction to common practices and processes that are generally accepted in the industry with an emphasis on the actor’s role in the filmmaking process and in the television industry. This is an intensive, professionally oriented class, preparing actors for auditioning and acting on camera. The three major areas of focus are: 1) Developing your acting technique by bringing an in-depth personalization to the work 2) Making the transition from acting on stage to acting for the camera 3) Understanding the first demand of camera acting—coming to terms with and understanding your specific “actor type” and learning to present yourself accordingly. Material will include a stage monologue (from a contemporary realistic play) that will be adjusted for the camera, an “open scene” and film and television scripts.