ARH COURSE OFFERINGS

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REQUIRED COURSES FOR ARH MAJORS & MINORS

• All of these courses fulfill EXPRESSION credit.
• ARH 210 and ARH 211 count towards the Classical Studies Minor.
• ARH 212 counts towards the International Studies Major and the American Studies Minor.

CS: ARH 210. ART AND HISTORY I: GODS & EMPERORS (4 sh)
MWF 9:2510:35
LIEBHART
This course introduces you to the history of world art and architecture from the Neolithic Period through the Late Roman Period. This will include the study of materials and production, as well as an introduction to the often specialized vocabulary related to ancient art. In addition, we will address issues such as gender, identity, power and the reception of the art (both ancient and modern), provenance, conservation, and museum ethics, among other topics. You will learn to think and speak critically about visual and textual material from the Assyrian palace to the Roman temple.
No prerequisite. 

CS: ARH 211. ART AND HISTORY II: CATHEDRALS TO CONQUEST (4 sh)
T/TH 12:25-2:50
GATTI
This course introduces you to the history of world art and architecture from the 4th century through the 16th century. As we move from the ancient world to the development of monotheistic empires, we investigate contacts and conflicts between the arts of Church and State, the cultures of the Mosque and the Temple, and the politics of mapping the "New World". We will consider the ideals of Renaissance within a global context, including a discussion of the arts of mission, acts of omission, and art as diplomacy. This course ends with a discussion of conquests and colonialism, including the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople and Columbus’ voyage to the Americas. You will learn to think and speak critically about visual and textual material from the Byzantine Church to the Ottoman mosque.
No prerequisite.  

AS:IS: ARH 212. ART AND HISTORY II: REFORM, REVOLT, CRITIQUE (4 sh)
MW 3:35-5:15
RINGELBERG
This course introduces you to the history of world art and architecture from the 17th century to the present. We will explore the contexts in which these works were created, considering a variety of factors that influenced their production, style, meaning, authorship, patronage, and continued importance. We will pay particular attention to historical moments of revolution and reform as well as the increasing emphasis placed on art’s critical function in society both culturally and politically. You will learn to think and speak analytically about visual and textual material from Italian Baroque architecture to contemporary Japanese performance art.
No prerequisite. 

ARH 301. ART HISTORY’S METHODOLOGIES
TH 10:30-12:10
RINGELBERG
This course introduces students to the various methodologies used to analyze a work of art as well as the role that the study of art has played in defining contemporary visual culture. The course material will be presented through assigned readings and class discussion, highlighting the work of contemporary and historically significant art historians, philosophers, art critics and artists.
Prerequisite: A 200-level art history course.

UPPER-LEVEL COURSE OFFERINGS

WGS: ARH 320. ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ART
TTH 2:20-4:00
RINGELBERG
This course considers the arts since 1960, covering the period both broadly and in selective detail.  To better understand how and why art in our time takes the forms it does, we will consider new approaches to creating and exhibiting art, relevant social and political issues to which artists respond, and the impact of critical theory upon both the visual arts and art history and criticism. Also counts towards the Women's and Gender Studies minor. No prerequisite. Only offered in the fall.

ARH 378. PATRONAGE OR PLUNDER
MW 1:40-3:20
GATTI
From the ancient world to the contemporary, cultures have defined themselves through artistic commissions and collections. These commissions and collections might be the result of patronage--or plunder. Works of art have served as booty, been destroyed to define a new dynasty, and even been discredited to establish new styles or emerging art markets. In this class we will consider the politics of art collecting and display across distinct cultural periods. Through scholarly readings and class discussion we will address the topic as a series of case studies, considering historical perspectives, contemporary critical theory, and, when possible, legal contexts. Students will develop an independent research project over the course of the semester; museum visits and attendance at additional lectures will be required. This course fulfills Expression credit and counts towards a major or minor in Art History and minors in German Studies and Classical Studies. No prerequisite.

COURSES THAT COUNT AS ARH ELECTIVES

ART 112. FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN
TTH 10:30-1:10
FELS
This introduction to the fundamental principles and processes of two-dimensional design uses a variety of traditional and non-traditional media with an emphasis on problem-solving, craftsmanship, creative exploration and effective use of the language of art. This course fulfills the Expression requirement for General Studies. Materials Fee: $75. Offered fall and spring.

ART 114. TIME ARTS
MW 9:20-12:00
DIROSA
Time Arts is a foundations art course that explores the “fourth dimension” in art: time and space. Using such media as video, sound, animation, installation art, and photography, the course investigates the potential for art in unexpected spaces and explores processes that unfold over time. This course fulfills the Expression requirement for General Studies. Materials Fee: $150. Offered fall.

INTERDISCIPLINARY CAPSTONE SEMINARS TAUGHT BY ARH/ART AFFILIATED FACULTY

GST 310. MUSEUM STUDIES: MATERIAL CULTURE AND THE CREATION OF MEANING (4sh)
MW  1:40-3:20
MOORE
This seminar will introduce students to the practice of managing objects within a museum context including: collections development, accepted museum registration methods, cataloging, condition reporting, caring for the collection, and an exploration of ethical and philosophical concerns with museum collections. Once students have been familiarized with collections policy and practice, they will examine how, through the presentation of objects, museums can (and do) create meaning. Course readings will include sources specific to the care, presentation, and management of museum collections as well as material culture theory, art criticism, reflections on the power of interpretation, and the process of exhibiting “culture” and history. Students will be expected to participate in class discussion, work in small groups, and assist with peer review. Additionally, students will be required to complete a designated number of hours assisting either in the inventory of the Elon Art Collection or at an outside facility. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study.