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Department of History and Geography

History Courses

2014-15 Undergraduate Academic Catalog

Core courses

HST 111. EUROPE AND THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD THROUGH 1500 (4 sh)
This survey of major developments in the Mediterranean world begins with the ancient Mesopotamian and Egyptian civilizations, continues through Greece and Rome, and concludes at the end of the Medieval Age. The course will cover the rise and decline of civilizations, the transitions of great empires, change versus continuity in economic, political, social, and cultural institutions over time, and interactions and mutual influences among different peoples. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 112. EUROPE AND THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD 1500 (4 sh)
A survey of major developments in the Mediterranean world from 1500 to the present, this study covers the rise of the major European powers during the period and discusses their interaction with one another and the Middle East and North Africa, particularly in the 19th and 20th centuries. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 120. THE UNITED STATES AND NORTH CAROLINA THROUGH RECONSTRUCTION (4 sh)
This survey of U.S. history from pre-Columbian times through the Civil War and Reconstruction places special emphasis on how major political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the nation have influenced North Carolina. The course also considers the implications of those events and developments on the state and nation after Reconstruction. No credit for students with prior credit for HST 121. Offered fall and spring. 
 
HST 121. UNITED STATES HISTORY THROUGH 1865 (4 sh)
This survey of early U.S. history includes the major political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the U.S. from the first explorations of the continent through 1865, and considers the implications of these events and developments on the American experience after 1865. No credit for students with prior credit for HST 120. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 122. UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1865 (4 sh)
The study of U.S. history continues in this course with emphasis on the major political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the nation from the Civil War to the present. The course also examines how events and developments that occurred prior to 1865 influenced the nation's evolution after the Civil War. No credit for students with prior credit for HST 123. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 123. THE UNITED STATES AND NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1865 (4 sh)
This survey of U.S. history since the Civil War places special emphasis on how major political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the nation have influenced North Carolina. The course also examines how events and developments that occurred prior to 1865 influenced the nation's evolution after the Civil War. No credit for students with prior credit for HST 122. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 131-149. SPECIAL TOPICS 2-4 (sh)
These courses are designed for entry-level students and address specific topics. Each topic is examined in broad historic context. These courses meet the Core Curriculum requirement. Previous topics have included: the Civil Rights Movement, Anti-Communism in America, Jews and Gypsies in Western Civilization and Being and Becoming Indian.
 
HST 221. THE WORLD IN THE 20TH CENTURY (4 sh)
This survey of contemporary history examines critical events, ideologies and movements that have shaped our world. Students gain an understanding of the historical context of current global issues by examining developments in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. Offered spring.
 
HST 241. U.S. HISTORY STUDY TOUR (4 sh)
Through readings, discussions and visits to historic sites, students will learn about major turning points, issues and actors in U.S. history. Students will grapple with the contested nature of historical interpretation and identify some of the "driving forces" that have caused and influenced Americans' experiences. Open to first year Teaching Fellows only. Offered winter.
 
HST 251. HISTORY STUDIES ABROAD (4 sh)
This course offers a specialized study for those participating in study abroad programs. Offered winter.
 
HST 301. RESEARCH METHODS (4 sh)
Students will focus on framing and answering historical questions using a variety of research techniques and both primary and secondary source materials. They will formulate and execute a research project that will result in both a written and oral presentation of their findings. Offered fall and spring.

 

AFRICA and the MIDDLE EAST

HST 252. GHANA: AN EXPLORATION OF WEST AFRICA’S HISTORY AND CULTURE 4 sh
This course is designed for students to experience life in vibrant modern Ghana while they gain an appreciation for the country’s rich past. The class includes visits to historic sites, markets, palaces and museums; participation in cultural events; family visits in rural communities; treks through parks; and lectures by Ghanaian university faculty. Students learn about the powerful Asante state, the tragic trans-Atlantic slave trade, and Ghana’s important role in the struggle for African independence. The class offers rewarding service opportunities assisting Ghanaians with development projects. Offered winter term.
 
HST 313. MODERN AFRICA (4 sh)
This survey course explores developments in Africa during the past century (especially regions south of the Sahara) and examines African responses to European imperialism, African independence and the problems faced by the new African states.
 
HST 316. THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST 4 sh
This course offers an historical perspective for better understanding critical issues in the modern Middle East. Students will survey the rise of Islam, the Ottoman Empire and Western Imperialism in the 19th century before focusing on events of the 20th century. Two world wars and their consequences; the rise of modern states, the development of nationalism, pan-Arabian and Islamic revival, social tensions, regional conflicts and the economics of oil; and contemporary revolutionary political events will be examined. Students will learn about a topic of personal interest through individual research projects. Offered fall of odd years.
 

RUSSIA

HST 318. Russia, 1801 to the Present (4 sh)
This course will look at the major developments in Russian history from the time of the reign of Alexander I until the present day. Readings are selected to give students a personal view of each major period under discussion from the perspectives of those who lived then. Major topics include the impact of politics, religion and war on each of the major periods we study. Offered fall and spring.
 

ASIA

HST 321: CHINA: EMPIRE AND REVOLUTION 1800-PRESENT (4 sh)
This course will look at the major developments in Chinese history from the beginning of the 19th century until today. Its principal focus will be the impact of the major historical, cultural, intellectual and philosophical traditions that have affected China over the past two centuries. It will also highlight the major historical events in China during this period – the opening of China during the Opium Wars, the major upheavals caused by China's interactions with the West in the 19th and early 20th centuries, the collapse of the imperial system in 1911, the warlord era, the Nationalist period of domination between 1927 and 1949, and the successes and failure of communist rule since 1949. Offered fall and spring.
 

EUROPE

HST 324. ENGLAND WITHIN THE BRITISH EMPIRE: 17TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT (4 sh)
This course surveys the dramatic transformations affecting the British peoples since the Civil War. It examines shifts and ruptures in the national identities of the English, Welsh, Scots and Irish peoples as the became "British" in this period. It also studies processes of colonial and imperial expansion and devolution, and makes use of the lenses of class, gender and race in discussing social and cultural transformations within the British Empire. 
 
HST 325. TOPICS IN MODERN BRITISH HISTORY (4 sh)
This course is organized around a central topic or theme, the study of which provides insight into important developments in modern British history. The course is offered only in London and is limited to students enrolled in the Semester in London Program.
 
HST 326. HISTORY OF ANCIENT GREECE (4 sh)
This course focuses on the political, social and cultural characteristics of the ancient Greeks, from the Bronze Age (featuring the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations) to the Classical period, and to Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic era. Myths, warfare, Athenian democracy and imperialism, the Sophist Movement, gender roles, literature, and arts will be explored in historical context.
 
HST 327. HISTORY OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC AND EMPIRE
This course explores the development of Rome from a small city state in the 8th century BCE, to a multi-ethnic empire that spanned Europe, Africa, and Asia, and to the decline and eventual collapse of the Western Empire in the 5th century. Topics of focus include military and political institutions, personalities who took part in major events, interactions among different social classes (and between the Romans and foreigners), roles of men and women, daily life and religion.
 
HST 328. ANCIENT HEROES
This course examines the historical and social contexts surrounding ancient conceptions of heroes and heroism, through a study of mythological and historical figures in Antiquity: Gilgamesh, Odysseus, the 300 Spartans, Socrates, Alexander, Spartacus, Julius Caesar, Arminius, gladiators and Simeon Stylites. Focal themes include the societal values, longings, and ideals which these characters embodied, and their representations in ancient sources and modern literature/popular culture.
 
HST 331. WORLD WAR I IN FILM AND LITERATURE (4 sh)
In this course, we will examine the poetry, novels, memoirs and films of the First World War to trace, not only the history of the war and its impact on literature, but also how popular perception of the war has changed in the decades since it ended. Offered winter.
 
HST 338. GERMANY: WAR, DEMOCRACY AND HISTORY 1914-1945 (4 sh)
This course will explore the history of Germany from the outbreak of World War I through the end of World War II. It begins with an examination of the Second Reich (1871-1918) but concentrates on the two world wars and Germany's experiments with democracy during the Weimar Republic and dictatorship during the Nazi era.
 
HST 339. A HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST (4 sh)
This history of the Holocaust explores the roots of this event, beginning with historical anti-Semitism and the impact of this tradition on Adolph Hitler and the Nazis. Topics also include Hitler's racial policies between 1933-1938, their spread throughout Nazi Europe between 1939-1941, the evolution of the Final Solution from 1941-45 and post-World War II Holocaust developments and questions.

 

LATIN AMERICA and CANADA

HST 140 INTRODUCTION TO CARIBBEAN HISTORY (4 sh)
This course is a historical survey of the people and places of the English, French, and Spanish Caribbean from its discovery by Europeans around 1492 to the Independence movements of the 20th century. We will discuss the arrival of Europeans and Africans in the region and the various forms of coerced labor that resulted from the introduction of cash crops, especially sugar. We will also study how the Caribbean experience varied by island, place of origin, social and economic status, race and color, and gender. We will conclude the course with a brief discussion of post-Independent Caribbean societies.
 
HST 349. SLAVERY AND RESISTANCE (4 sh)
Why did slaves rebel? Or to ask a different, but equal important, question: Why didn’t every slave rebel? Over the course of this semester we will briefly examine slavery in the ancient world, systems of slavery in West Africa, and more deeply explore the evolution of slave societies in the New World—North America, Latin America, and the Caribbean—in an effort to begin to address these questions. We will devote the rest of the semester to studying the various forms of resistance that enslaved men and women engaged in from the 16th through the 19th centuries. We will explore the individual acts of resistance that steadily chipped away at the peace of mind of slave owners as well as the collective, violent rebellions that so terrified slave owners and non-slave owners alike.
 
HST 351. HISTORY OF MODERN MEXICO (4 sh)
An introduction to the history of Mexico and to its contemporary cultural and political life. The role of native peoples is emphasized in the early colonial period and in recent developments. The course also explores Mexico's relationship with the U.S.
 
HST 352.  CANADA/U.S. RELATIONS SINCE 1865 (4 sh)
This class is a comparison of some of the major events in both Canadian and U.S. history since 1865. Students will learn about the different approaches to nation building in both countries, policies toward First Nation/Native Americans, war, women’s rights, politics, foreign policy, immigration and other issues. The class will spend about half of the semester examining Canada and its history. The other half of class will be used to look at Canadian/U.S. relations in several variances. Here lies the crux of the relationship – two countries with similar backgrounds and cultures yet possessing
dissimilar cultural and social traits. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 353. COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA (4 sh)
This course will survey the history of Latin America from pre-Colombian times through the wars for independence at the beginning of the 19th century. The course seeks to explain the development of a multicultural, multiethnic and multilingual society in Latin America by studying the cultures of pre-Columbian and Iberian societies, the complexities of the interaction between these different cultures as they "met in the Americas" and the historical processes through which new cultures evolved. Some of the major topics that will be discussed include Amerindian culture, the encounter between Europeans and Amerindians (otherwise known as the Conquest), the rise and fall of colonial empires and colonial society, and the civil wars of independence. Offered fall.
 
HST 354. MODERN LATIN AMERICA (4 sh)
This course will survey the history of Latin America from the early 19th century to the present. The goal of the course is to enable students to gain an understanding of issues in contemporary Latin America by placing them in a historical perspective. The course is structured thematically focusing on subjects including the social implications of various models of economic development, the opportunities and problems which result from economic ties to wealthy countries, changing ethnic, gender and class relations in Latin America and the diverse efforts of Latin American people to construct stable and equitable political, economic and social systems. In examining these topics, examples will be drawn from the histories of various Latin American countries. Offered fall.
 

THE UNITED STATES

HST 355. ORAL HISTORY: NORTH CAROLINA WOMEN (4 sh)
This course focuses on what it was like to be a North Carolina woman in the 20th century, focusing on the factors that influenced their lives, especially gender and region. The course also focuses on oral history as a method of doing historical research. Student swill prove their competencies in oral history by doing a major project.
 
HST 356. EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD, 1787-1840: FORCES THAT SHAPED THE NATION (4 sh)
A study of the thought that produced the American Constitution and the implementation of that national government during the administration of its first seven presidents. Topics examine political, social and economic forces that affected national decisions and development.
 
HST 357. AMERICA's CIVIL WAR (4 sh)
Beginning with the era of Andrew Jackson, this course focuses on the geographic, economic, social and political dynamics that tore the nation apart. Students analyze the causes of the Civil War and examine its military, social and political facets. A concluding study of the Reconstruction of the nation explores the resolution (or not) of the issues that generated the conflict.
 
HST 358. The U.S., 1877-1940: THE CONSEQUENCES OF MODERNIZATION (4 sh)
Focusing on the transformation to industrial capitalism, this course explores the major developments in American history from the end of Reconstruction to the beginning of World War II. Students examine the Gilded Age, progressivism, World War I, prosperity and nativism in the 1920s, the Great Depression and the New Deal, and the coming of war in Europe and Asia.
 
HST 359. The UNITED STATES SINCE 1940: RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY (4 sh)
This study of recent American history is organized around four major themes: America in World War II, America's obsession with stopping the spread of Communism, the tumultuous social movements of the 1960s and the disillusionment caused by Vietnam and Watergate. Class discussions center on how these events continue to affect American institutions.
 
HST 360. MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY IN FILM (4 sh)
Students will, through group activities, class discussions and independent work, learn how twentieth century United States history has influenced the growth of the American cinema, while concurrently discerning the impact of film on the evolution of modern American culture. Offered winter.
 
HST 361. NORTH CAROLINA IN THE NATION (4 sh)
This course analyzes important events, people, and issues in the history of North Carolina, focusing on three periods: the pre-colonial and colonial era, the mid-19th century, and the 20th century. Themes include the diversity of people and power struggles in the colonial era; slavery and the impact of the Civil War in the 19th century; and modernization, progress and race relations in the 20th century.
 
HST 362. THE SOUTH IN AMERICAN HISTORY (4 sh)
This course examines the South (especially post-Civil War) as a distinctive region of the U.S., including reasons for such distinctiveness and its impact on the nation's history.
 
HST 363. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1850-PRESENT (4 sh)
Beginning with the slave system in the mid-19th century, this course examines recurring issues and problems in African-American history through the post-Civil Rights era. Study focuses on three themes: the similarity and differences of African-American experiences; the extent to which they were oppressed yet also had choices; and their strategies to cope with their social and political situations.
 
HST 364. HISTORY OF WOMEN IN THE U.S. (4 sh)
This course surveys the experiences of women in the U.S., emphasizing their changing political and economic status and gender role expectations. Topics focus on the historical factors – politics, war, social movements, technology and ideology – that caused such changes, strategies women utilized to change or cope with their situations, and differences among women.
 
HST 365. SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN POST-CIVIL WAR AMERICAN (4 sh)
This course covers organized efforts to change American society since Reconstruction, including social movements from Populism in the late 1800s to the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and the responses to these movements.
 
HST 366. U.S. FOREIGN POLICY SINCE 1865 (4 sh)
This class is designed to cover American foreign policy since the end of the Civil War to the present. Another way to conceptualize the class is to note that it is comprised mainly as diplomatic history. However, it is not traditional in that we will focus on not only the major diplomatic events and the players who brought them about but also the interconnection of diplomacy among various groups in American society. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 367. AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY THROUGH 1865 (2 sh)
Focus is on the impact of the American Revolution on the evolution of the Army and Navy, the relationship between military power and a growing sense of nationhood and the American Civil War. Students will explore causes of military conflicts, the strategy and tactics of campaigns and the impact of the resolution of these conflicts.
 
HST 368. AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY SINCE 1865 (2 sh)
This course analyzes military power as a component of foreign policy. Students concentrate on America's shift from an isolationist nation to a major world power by examining the Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, the Korean Conflict, Vietnam and recent engagements.
 
HST 369. TOPICS IN AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY (4 sh)
Stressing the active role that Indian people have taken in the creation of their own history, this course focuses on complicated cultural and historic realities. Topics include pre-Columbian Indian societies, cultural adaptation, removal, the Reservation Age, resistance movements, the Indian New Deal, postwar activism and cultural revitalization.
 
HST 391. AMERICAN INDIANS IN THE 20th CENTURY (4 sh)
During the 20th century, American Indians faced consistent pressure to give up their traditional cultures and assimilate into the mainstream. Many communities willingly accommodated themselves to new practices and beliefs, but this did not mean that in doing so they abandoned traditional values. Instead, in case after case, native people ensured the survival of important rituals, beliefs and institutions by carefully and deliberately combining their old ways with new ones. This course examines these adaptive strategies from a number of perspectives including politics, religion, economics and
ceremonial life. Offered Winter Term.
 
HST 392. NORTH AMERICAN SLAVERY (4 sh)
This course examines the forced servitude of men and women of African descent in North America, particularly that portion which ultimately became the United States. While it considers other variations of unfree labor, especially indentured servitude and the enslavement of Amerindian peoples, the emphasis is on the men and women caught up in the Atlantic trade from Africa and their descendents. We will stress the dynamic nature of slavery, how the experience of both slave owners and slaves varied according to time and to place. A significant amount of attention will also go to the
process of emancipation and enfranchisement—to the battles that freed people and their allies fought for inclusion as full citizens in the United States. Offered fall and spring.
 

Seminars, internships and independent research

HST 460-469. SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS (4 sh)
A capstone experience for majors, this course offers students practical experience in researching, writing and presenting a senior thesis. Past topics have included the Holocaust, American Indian Religion, Nazi Germany, Human Rights in Latin America, Gender and Sexuality in American History, Twentieth Century Europe, and Daily Life in Greece and Rome. Prerequisite: HST 301 or permission of the instructor. Offered fall and spring.
 
HST 481. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY 2-4 (sh)
Designed to provide students with practical experience in history-related professions, activities included in the internship enable students to explore careers in archives, record management, historic sites, museum administration, etc. Prerequisite: 18 semester hours of history.
 
HST 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 2-4 (sh)
Open to junior/senior majors/minors or others with permission of instructor.
 
HST 499. RESEARCH IN HISTORY 1-4 (sh)
Open to junior/senior majors/minors or others with permission. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a formal presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration.
 

Additional History Related Courses

GST 237. Introduction to Museums
This course will explore the make-up and types of modern museums as well as examine the complex relationship they have (and have had) with public audiences, community collaborators, and even their own employees. Through exercises like interviewing museum professionals, visiting sites, and analyzing sources, students will be able to understand and express not only the day-to-day aspects of an institution’s work but also what the intended goal of these practices are (i.e. big picture goals).  Students will then be able to use this knowledge to speculate on what the future holds for museums.
 
GST 310. The Museum Collection: Material Culture and the Creation of Meaning
This course will introduce you to the practice of managing objects within a museum context. Examples include: collections development, accepted museum registration methods, cataloging, condition reporting, caring for the collection, and an exploration of ethical and philosophical concerns with museum collections. Once you have been familiarized with collections policy and practice, we will examine how, through the presentation of objects, museums can (and do) create meaning. Course readings will include sources specific to the care, presentation, and management of museum collections as well as material culture theory, art criticism, reflections on the power of interpretation, and the process of exhibiting “culture” and history.
 

This page was updated June 24, 2014.