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Anthropology Courses

2014-15 Undergraduate Academic Catalog

ANT 112. INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 4 sh
Cultural anthropology is the comparative exploration of diverse beliefs, practices and material culture of contemporary human societies throughout the world. Inherent to this study is consideration of the historical, political, economic and environmental contexts in which cultures operate.The variety of ways humans define their place in the universe, interact with their physical, social and spiritual environments, and endow their existence with meaning and order are at the core of cultural anthropological inquiry. In this course, students will learn the basic concepts, theories and methods used by anthropologists studying people and culture. Specific topics include cross-cultural patterns of subsistence, marriage and family, social organization, economics, politics, religion, globalization and culture change and the application of anthropology to contemporary social problems. Offered fall and spring. 

ANT 113. HUMAN EVOLUTION AND ADAPTATION 4 sh
This course provides a basic introduction to neo-Darwinian theory and natural selection, Mendelian and population genetics, mechanisms of human biological and cultural adaptation, and interpretation of the primate and hominid fossil record (drawing on both paleontology and molecular genetics). Special attention is paid to the interaction of social mechanisms with biological and environmental influences in human evolution. Readings include an introduction to medical biotechnology and the Human Genome Diversity Project.

ANT 114. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHEOLOGY 4 sh
Introduction to Archeology presents the current state of archeology by exploring its historical roots and covers basic archeological theories, methods, and practice. This includes techniques for investigation, recovery, reconstruction, interpretation and preservation, as well as ethical considerations.

ANT 121. CROSS-CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS 2 sh
This course is an introduction to the subject of culture and to living in a multicultural world. The central theme of the course is appreciating as well as understanding cultural diversity. Students will develop and expand their cultural sensitivity through a variety of experiential activities focused on becoming more aware of the role of culture as central in defining who we are as individuals. Exposure to the unique approaches of anthropologists in encountering and communicating with peoples of different cultures and backgrounds will be emphasized. This course will serve as an excellent foundation for a variety of
majors in communications, the humanities, the social sciences, business, education and for those with a geographic focus such as Asia, Africa, Russia, etc. It will also serve as preparation for the Studies Abroad experience.

ANT 215. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS 4 sh
This course examines the ways qualitative analyses (non-numerical data) help social scientists explore questions of meaning within specific social and cultural contexts, and historical moments. Specific topics include: participant observation, focus groups, open-ended interviewing, thematic coding, archival research and data analysis with a qualitative computer software program. The complementary relationship between qualitative and quantitative research methods will be considered, with a sustained focus on the particular strengths and weaknesses of qualitative research design. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or ANT 112. Cross-listed with SOC 215.

ANT 216. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS 4 sh
This course examines the ways quantitative analyses (numerical data) help social scientists investigate issues, problems and relationships within social and cultural contexts. Specific topics include: discussion of the scientific method, survey methodology, sampling techniques, hypothesis testing, aggregate level analyze, and issues of reliability, validity and generalizability, as well as data analysis with SPSS. The complementary relationship between quantitative and qualitative research designs will be considered, with a focus on the strengths and weaknesses of quantitative research design. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or ANT 112. Offered spring semester. Cross-listed with SOC 216.

ANT 227. FROM THE GROUND DOWN 4 sh
Students explore the adventure and science of archeology from the perspective of an anthropologist. This course highlights great discoveries in archeology with a look at famous sites worldwide. An overview of the development of archeology from treasure hunting to a high-tech science are presented. Additional topics include fieldwork techniques, artifact analysis, interpretation, forensic analysis and cultural resource preservation. The course may include a visit to an archeological site in the area, weather permitting. 

ANT 230. FOLKLORE 4 sh
Far from being relegated to the quaint shadows of the past, folklore thrives today in everyday life, from its humblest use in small social settings to its wide-reaching use in the politics of globalization. Folklore, the study of traditional expressive culture, is both a window into the values and beliefs of the people who share it, as well as an artistic product with value and merit in its own right. While we will examine individual folklore forms—including verbal art, ritual, festival and material culture—focus will be on the examination of folklore performance within its situational and cultural contexts, including family, school, religion, work and play.

ANT 253. INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIA 4 sh
Indigenous peoples of Australia have created the longest continuing cultural tradition in the world today. This course emphasizes the traditional, colonial and contemporary experiences of first Australian peoples through the socio-cultural imagination. Through lectures, field trips and directed self learning, students will explore important issues in Indigenous
Australian people’s quest for equality and cultural survival. Offered winter. Cross-listed with SOC 253.

ANT 310 CULTURES OF THE SOUTH 4 sh
This class will explore the southeastern United States as a coherent, but often highly contested, culture region. Using the methods of cultural anthropology and folklore, we will explore the cultures of the South, both for the overarching themes and patterns that emerge across traditions, as well as for the diversity of view and opinion found in the specific, unique traditions grounded in the region. The class will pay particular attention to themes of race, gender, myth, history, narrative, community memory and authenticity.

ANT 312. NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURES 4 sh
In this course, we will examine the cultures of selected American Indian tribes in the U.S. The class will take as a dual focus current issues in Indian country implicated by diverse worldviews, and expressive culture as a way to understand the performed beliefs and values of a community. Current issues will include multiple constructions of identity, fishing and hunting rights, sovereignty, casinos and cultural appropriation. Aspects of expressive culture will include material culture such as pottery and sand-painting, orally and visually performed genres such as storytelling and dance, and spiritual beliefs and practices, particularly as conveyed through ritual and festival. Focus will be on contemporary American Indian cultures in their relevant social, cross-cultural and historical contexts. Prerequisite: ANT 112 or SOC 111.

ANT 314. NATIVE AMERICANS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA PIEDMONT 4 sh
Utilizing contact resources and archeological evidence this course examines the ethnohistory and ethnology of Piedmont Siouan Indians. Topics covered include social structure, subsistence patterns, mortuary practices, lithic traditions, processes of acculturation and the recent resurgence of ethnic identity among local Native Americans. The course concludes with field research at a local precontact archeological site.

ANT 323. VIDEO ETHNOGRAPHY 4 sh
For years, anthropologists have learned about other cultures through intensive fieldwork and then written about these cultures in books that line our library shelves. But in this technological age, many writers have become videographers, translating culture to the screen rather than the page. This class will introduce students to the process and art of ethnography and videography by reading published ethnographies, engaging with the current scholarship on visual anthropology, critically analyzing ethnographic films and finally researching, shooting and editing short video ethnographies. Prerequisite: SOS 111 or ANT 112. 

ANT 324. CULTURE AND SEX 4 sh
This course examines human sexuality from a bicultural perspective, exploring the physiology of human sexuality and the cross-cultural context of sexual expression. Themes include alternative sexual lifestyles, sexual dysfunction, the symbolic dimensions of sexuality and AIDS. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or ANT 112.

ANT 325. CULTURE, HEALTH AND ILLNESS 4 sh
This study of the bicultural basis of health and disease over time and across cultures examines the importance of culture in the experience of illness, diagnosis and treatments. Topics include the cultural implications of food and food habits, health care practices, the relationship of healers and patients, alternative health care practices and the relationship of mind and body in illness and recovery. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or ANT 112.

ANT 329. WOMEN, CULTURE AND THE WORLD 4 sh
This course focuses on women’s issues from an anthropological perspective emphasizing evolutionary and cross-cultural considerations and including the impact of globalization on women’s lives. Gender relations and women’s status/roles are discussed in the context of the following systems: economic, political, kinship and family, religion and healing. Topics include women’s life-cycles, the cultural construction of gender, personhood and violence against women. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or ANT 112.

ANT 361. HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY 4 sh
This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Students will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture and the politics of representation. Prerequisite: ANT 112.

ANT 380-389. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 2-4 sh
This series of courses reflects new contributions in anthropology or anthropological issues. Prerequisite: to be determined by instructor.

ANT 461. SENIOR SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 4 sh
This capstone course reviews major areas of anthropology and provides further opportunity to share research on these topics. Students conduct research ranging from how anthropological knowledge can be applied occupationally and politically to more basic, academic topics.  Prerequisites: ANT 215, ANT 216, ANT 361 and senior ANT major status.

ANT 471. SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS 2-4 sh

ANT 482. INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1-4 sh

Teaching, research, service and occupational internships are offered. Limited to four semester hours credit applicable to anthropology major or minor. Prerequisites: Department permission and at least sophomore standing.

ANT 489. TEACHING AND LEARNING APPRENTICESHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1-4 sh
Teaching and Learning Apprentices work with a faculty mentor on a particular course. This experience is intended for exceptional students who wish to deepen their knowledge of the discipline, gain a better understanding of the professional academic life, engage in a meaningful mentoring relationship with a faculty mentor around issues related to teaching, enhance their interpersonal and communication skills and develop their leadership skills. The experience may be of particular value to students who wish to pursue a career in higher education or teaching in general. This apprenticeship requires satisfactory completion of the following:

  • The TLA (teaching and learning apprentice) must have a) completed the course for which she/he will be a TLA with a grade of at least an A-, b)completed higher level relevant course work that prepares the student to be a TLA with a minimum grade of B+, or c) permission of the department chair;
  • The TLA must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher;
  • The TLA must have junior or senior standing.
  • A registration form must be completed and submitted prior to the first day of class for which the student will serve as a TLA. The form will require a syllabus and the signatures of the TLA, faculty mentor, the TLA's faculty advisor and the department chair/program director or coordinator. 

ANT 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 sh

ANT 499. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1- sh
The student develops an individual project of original research under the guidance of a professor within the department. Prerequisites: at least sophomore standing; anthropology major or minor; satisfactory completion of ANT 215 or ANT 216; and permission of the sponsoring professor. Students are also required to complete the department’s Independent Research form, a process that includes a description of the proposed research and a student-professor plan for completing the course.

This page was updated June 25, 2014.