Jamie Albright

Human Service Studies
Charlotte, NC
Mentor: Cindy Fair
Project title: Reproductive decisions among women with perinatal HIV infection: The influence of messages given and received from medical providers

Spring 2013

In my final semester, I primarily worked on writing papers that were (or will be) submitted for publication.  Firstly, I completed data analysis for my Elon College Fellows paper, which will be submitted to JAMA Pediatrics, which has put out a call for papers focused on adolescent transition issues in medical settings—a venue perfect for the subject matter of my paper, which documents the similarities and differences between the perspectives on sexual and reproductive health communication of adolescents living with HIV and their medical providers.  Dr. Fair and I completed and submitted a manuscript focused on the fertility desires and intentions of the cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired HIV that we interviewed in my first year as a Lumen scholar.  I also wrote a paper on which I will be first author that documents the narratives of HIV-positive adults from a community center at Greensboro.  Though not part of my Lumen work, it provided me with a broader understanding of the experience of those living with HIV and opened my eyes to issues of aging with HIV—valuable to my other work.  I have completed qualitative analyses for a paper that will be completed in the upcoming months based on the childbearing motivations and perspectives on parenting of young adults living with HIV.  Finally, I presented my work at SURF as well as the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine conference.  Because the data Dr. Fair and I have collected over the past 2.5 years is vast and substantial, I prepared and organized “leftover” data that can be used by future students for research projects.

My Lumen research experience has directly influenced my plans for my career trajectory.  I have fallen in love with the research process, working with people to improve their quality of life, and the dynamic learning opportunities offered in academia.  I will attend the University of Virginia’s graduate school in the fall to pursue a PhD in clinical psychology, for which I have received full tuition and a generous living stipend—all of which I know would not have been possible without my experiences here! 

 

For More Information

Dr. Ann J. Cahill
Professor of Philosophy
Spence Pavilion 111
2340 Campus Box
Elon, NC 27244
Phone: (336) 278-5703
cahilla@elon.edu

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