Center for Law and Humanities

Programs and Initiatives

The Center for Law and Humanities will undertake a number of initiatives in order to advance its mission. Continue to visit this site for updates to our offerings.

Law and Humanities Lecturers   

The Center for Law and Humanities will periodically sponsor lectures by legal scholars, scholars in the arts and sciences, and practitioners whose research, writing, and professional activities expand the intellectual depth and interdisciplinary connections of law and humanities.  

Inaugural Law and Humanities Lecture -  Professor Frank H. Wu 

Frank H. Wu, former dean of the Wayne State University Law School and visiting professor at the University of Maryland and George Washington University, was our inaugural Law and Humanities Lecturer on October 28, 2008. Professor Wu is author of the provocative 2002 book, Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White. Wu met with law students, faculty, and guests at a breakfast mixer at the Center for Law and Humanities. He taught a short course to undergraduate students on the Vincent Chin murder and the emergence of Asian-American identity and offered his public lecture, "New Directions in American Civil Rights." 

Law and Humanities Lecturers and Topics 2008 - Present

 

2013 - 2014

CLH at the MLA - Presidential Theme Panel:  Jo Carillo, Eric Ashley Hairston, Peter Jaros, and Trinyan Mariano         

          "Law, Literature, and the Possibility of Justice."

2012 - 2013

Dr. Mary Foskett, Director, Wake Forest Humanities Institute

          "Humanities in the Contemporary Academy"

Leary Davis, Founding Dean of the Elon University School of Law

          "Constitutional Values, Citizenship, Hard Questions, and Civil Discourse"

2011 - 2012

David Ogden, former Deputy Attorney General of the U.S.

          "Justice at the Intersection of Law and Politics"

Dr. Kendra Hamilton, University of Virginia

          "A Geography of Addiction:  "Tobacco, Jefferson, and the 'Founding Farmers.' "

2010 - 2011

Attorney Christine Mumma and Exonerated Defendant Gregory Taylor

          "Wrongful Convictions"

2009 - 2010

Dr. John C. Shields, Illinois State University

          “The American Aeneas:  George Washington and the Foundation of the Republic.”

Dr. Katy Harriger, Wake Forest University

           “The Referee Returns: Separation of Powers and the United States Supreme Court.”

2008 - 2009

Frank H. Wu, University of Maryland and George Washington University

           “New Directions in American Civil Rights."
 

Student Research

The Center for Law and Humanities will endeavor to support undergraduate and law student research on subjects at the intersection of law and humanities. Undergraduates and law students at the Center may arrange internship or research opportunities through affiliated faculty and the American Judicature Society. Undergraduate students are also encouraged to pursue the many research opportunities available directly through the College of Arts and Sciences, for which affiliated faculty and departments may serve as mentors. A number of students have already undertaken research with affiliated faculty and administration of the Center.                                      

Lumen Scholars

Amanda Morrissey - www.elon.edu/e-net/Note.aspx?id=928820

Intersections of Law and Humanities

          2012 - Kuylain Howard - Copyrights, lawsuits, and international access to Korean popular

                      cultural productions

                   - Elizabeth Purvis - Ancient crown and public documents and the folk hero Redmon

                      O'Hanlan

          2011 - Caitlyn Byrne - (Health Equity Scholar) Medical Narratology

ENGL 255 – Law, Literature, and Humanities (Spring 2008)

Douglass Colvard - “A Resolution to Adjudicating Cases Involving Human Embryos”
Ramsey Horn – “Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: A Look at its History"
Amanda Morrissey - "Charging Knowing Exposure of Another to HIV/AIDS With Murder”

Prelaw Program

The Prelaw program at Elon University provides undergraduate students with advising in advance of law school applications as well as opportunities to receive preparation for the LSAT through Kaplan. The Prelaw program will also offer more ambitious students a certificate program reflecting the completion of a recommended course of study in preparation for law school.  Prelaw students can also participate in the Elon mock trial team, a Phi Alpha Delta chapter, and independent research and internships for varied experiences and academic and social engagement with the legal and communities.

Courses

Faculty affiliated with the Center offer a number of courses that create a substantive foundation of humanistic study, public policy analysis, historical foundations, or philosophical and literary backgrounds.  Other courses directly engage questions of law or law and humanities. The Center offers English 255: Law, Literature, and Humanities in the undergraduate Department of English and during the Winter Term in the School of Law.  

The Center encourages undergraduates interested in the law or the intersection of the law with other disciplines to carefully examine the rich catalog offerings of Elon University departments and programs.  Although students interested in law school often look at traditionally political or historical disciplines or prelaw majors and minors where they exist, consider the courses offered in these disciplines as well.
    
School of Communications
GST 115. PUBLIC SPEAKING
COM 100. COMMUNICATIONS IN A GLOBAL AGE
COM 230. MEDIA HISTORY, MEDIA TODAY
COM 300. PERSUASION
COM 333. RELIGION AND MEDIA
COM 334. POLITICS AND MEDIA
COM 400. MEDIA LAW AND ETHICS

Department of Philosophy
PHL 113 CRITICAL THINKING
PHL 331 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
PHL 333 MODERN PHILOSOPHY
PHL 341 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW
PHL 431 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY
PHL 432 AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
PHL 433 MARX, DARWIN, AND FREUD
                                                                                            
Department of Economics
ECO 271. SEMINAR: ECONOMIC ISSUES
ECO 301. BUSINESS ECONOMICS
ECO 317. GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

Department of English
ENG 200. CRITICAL CONVERSATIONS IN LITERARY STUDIES
ENG 215. INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL WRITING AND RHETORIC
ENG 223/4. AMERICAN LITERATURE I/II
ENG 238/9. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE/SINCE 1945

ENG 260. LITERATURE AND LAW
ENG 304. UNDERSTANDING RHETORIC
ENG 310. CROSS-CULTURAL RHETORICS
ENG 321. CLASSICAL LITERATURE
ENG 324. ENLIGHTENMENT
ENG 328. MODERNISM
ENG 333. WOMEN IN LITERATURE: FEMINIST APPROACHES
ENG 339. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS
ENG 359. AFRICAN-AMERICAN NOVELS

Department of Psychology
PSY 212. LEARNING AND MEMORY  
PSY 221. BIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR  
PSY 312. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY  
PSY 315. PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER  
PSY 323. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY  
PSY 331. PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING  
PSY 333. ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR  
PSY 343. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES
PSY 355. HUMAN PERCEPTION
PSY 357. CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR  
PSY 366. PSYCHOLOGY IN CULTURAL CONTEXT

Department of Human Services
HUS 311. POVERTY AND SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY
HUS 324. PERSPECTIVES AND ISSUES IN AGING  
HUS 349. VIOLENCE IN FAMILIES  
HUS 359. CRIMINAL JUSTICE  
HUS 369. JUVENILE JUSTICE   

Department of Sociology and Anthropology
SOC 241. SOCIAL ISSUES AND PROBLEMS
SOC 245. NONVIOLENCE OF THE BRAVE: FROM GANDHI TO KING
SOC 311. SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILIES
SOC 261. CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY
SOC 262. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL THEORY
SOC 333. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION
SOC 341. ETHNIC AND RACE RELATIONS 4 sh
SOC 342. SOCIAL DEVIANCE
SOC 345. SOCIOCULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER
SOC 355. CRIMINOLOGY