Therese Huston, “What We Should Know (but often don’t) About Gender and Decision Making”

Monday, October 10
Lakeside Meeting Room, 5 p.m.

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Freedom Sings

Wednesday, October 12
PARC at Danieley Center, 7:30 p.m.

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Donald Sinta Saxaphone Quartet

Thursday, November 3
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

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Shwetak Patel, “Applications of Computing to Health and Energy”

Monday, November 14
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

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Willy Wilkinson, “Viewing Trans Experience through a Mixed Heritage Lens"

Thursday, January 5
LaRose Digital Theatre, 6 p.m.

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Michele Norris, “The Race Card Project: Eavesdropping on America’s Conversation on Race”

Tuesday, January 10
McCrary Theatre, 6 p.m.

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September 2016

Thursday & Friday, September 1-2
The Second City
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m. both nights
Elon University Lyceum Series

Chicago's premier improvisation company returns to Elon with two shows packed with social and political satire. On Thursday, see "Free Speech! (While Supplies Last)" and "Second City Hits Home" on Friday. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available August 23.


Monday, September 5
Elon University Labor Day Program
Whitley Auditorium, 12:15 p.m.

A number of Elon colleagues will share with the campus community and especially students a greater appreciation of the role of labor in our lives from a number of perspectives. The program corresponds with the lunch hour as well as a class time in order that more might be able to attend. Classes are welcome.


Monday, September 5
Elizabeth Alexander: In Pursuit of Good Taste
artist talk, Gallery 406, 5:30 p.m.

Elizabeth Alexander is an interdisciplinary artist specializing in sculptures and installations made from paper and found objects. She is a member of the Boston Sculptors Gallery and was named “Best Artist of Boston” for 2014 by Improper Bostonian magazine.  Her work has been highlighted and reviewed by publications such as Sculpture Magazine, Hyperallergic, Boston Magazine, Fiber Art Now, The Boston Globe, Art New England, The New England Journal of Aesthetic Research, Santa Barbara News-Press, The Detroit Free Press, and New Glass Review. Exhibition runs through October 6.


POSTPONED: Tuesday, September 6 (NEW DATE TO BE SCHEDULED LATER THIS SEMESTER)
Julie Celona-VanGorden, In Her Words, recital
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Voice faculty member and soprano Julie Celona-VanGorden, with pianist Christy Wisuthseriwong, performs a variety of art-song with texts authored by women including Libby Larsen's song cycle "Try Me, Good King" in which the final words of five of Henry VIII's wives are set to dramatic and poignant music.  Also featured will be Edward Knight's "Tales Not Told" with texts by poet Mary Jane Alexander.  The contemporary poet speaks as different historical women including Mary Dyer, a Quaker who was hung for her beliefs in 1660, and Sara Towne Cloyce, who's sister, Rebecca Nurse, was tried at the Salem Witch Trials.  Francis Poulenc's beautiful and evocative song cycle, Fiancailles pour rire with poetry by Louise de Vilmorin, is also on the program. Sponsored by the Department of Music


Tuesday, September 13
Mike Domitrz, “Can I Kiss You?”
McKinnon Hall, 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. (two presentations)

Domitrz is an award-winning author who uses the powerful tool of humor to address healthy dating, consent, sexual decision-making, bystander intervention, sexual assault awareness and supporting sexual assault survivors.  His interactive program is emotionally honest, challenging, humorous and filled with skill-building activities.  Moving beyond awareness raising, this program teaches the audience exactly HOW to make a difference. Sponsored by the Department of Health Promotion


Tuesday, September 13
Refugee Voices from Syria
McBride Gathering Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, 4:30 - 6 p.m.
Reception to follow

Speak Out for Syria and the International and Global Studies program present a unique event featuring the voices and experiences of Syrian refugees in our community. Panelists will examine how this global political and moral crisis has developed since Elon examined the issue last fall. This is an opportunity to better understand the people behind the headlines and to discuss potential options to reduce suffering and end a war that has killed an estimated 500,000 people and created more than 4 million refugees since 2011. Additional sponsors include: The Center for the Study of Religion, Culture, and Society, The Center For Public Affairs--Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Peace and Conflict Studies and PERCS.

Identified by the Council on Civic Engagement as an opportunity to foster student intellectual and civic engagement.


Tuesday, September 13
Tectonic Plates: Alamance County's Science Café
Fat Frogg Bar & Grill, Elon, 7 p.m.

Learn cutting edge science in a relaxed informal atmosphere without all the technical jargon. Programs held on the second Tuesday of each month (September through December). September's program is presented by Eileen Claussen of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions speaking on 25 years of international and national climate politics. For information, visit www.facebook.com/TectonicPlatesScienceCafe.


Thursday, September 15
Bryan Stevenson, "American Injustice: Mercy, Humanity and Making a Difference"
Alumni Memorial Gym, Koury Athletic Center, 4:30 p.m.
Elon Common Reading Lecture

One of the most acclaimed and respected lawyers in the nation, Bryan Stevenson founded and is the executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative. His memoir, Just Mercy, is a New York Times bestseller and was chosen as the Elon Common Reading selection for 2016-17 as a first-year component of the Elon Core Curriculum. Stevenson was one of TIME 100 in 2015. Just Mercy is a beautifully written story about a lawyer who defends "the poor, the wrongly condemned, and those trapped in the furthest reaches of our criminal justice system. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available August 25.

Identified by the Council on Civic Engagement as an opportunity to foster student intellectual and civic engagement.


Thursday, September 15
Eid al-Adha Celebration
McBride Gathering Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, 6 p.m.

Students, staff and community members present stories and a sampling of traditional foods at Elon’s celebration of the Muslim festival known as the Feast of Sacrifice. The Eid recognizes the willingness of Abraham to sacrifice his son to God and commemorates the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. Sponsored by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life


Thursday, September 15
Hallie Coppedge Hogan, mezzo-soprano and Dan Callaway, tenor in faculty recital with Nancy Davis and Katherine Thomas, piano
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.
Music and Performing Arts faculty Hallie Coppedge Hogan and Dan Callaway present a song recital featuring the music of Debussy, Duparc, Brahms, and Barber. Sponsored by the Department of Music


Wednesday-Friday, September 21-23
Sand Mandala
Sacred Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, ongoing viewing

Tibetan Buddhist monks will construct a sand mandala for healing and peace during a period of three days. Viewers are encouraged to frequently stop by and see its progress. An opening ceremony will begin the process at 10 a.m. on Wednesday. At the closing ceremony, at 3 p.m. on Friday, the mandala will be deconstructed and the sand will be shared with the community and the earth. Sponsored by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life


Thursday, September 22
Lest We Forget
LaRose Digital Theater, 7 p.m.

This panel will critically remember, reflect on and engage our institutional history and various efforts to address systemic inequity and social justice. The panel will use a case-study format focusing on three instances that involve these issues. The panel includes Candice Blacknall ‘13, Lauren Clapp ‘13, Melissa Jordan, former Interim Director of the Multicultural Center, Jessie Moore, Associate Director of the Center for Engaged Learning/Associate Professor of English and Leigh-Anne Royster, Director of Inclusive Community Well-Being and will be moderated by Ann Cahill, Professor of Philosophy.

Identified by the Council on Civic Engagement as an opportunity to foster student intellectual and civic engagement.


Thursday, September 22
The Havana Cuba All-Stars perform "Cuban Nights"
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.
Elon University Lyceum Series

Direct from Havana, this 11-member ensemble is comprised of Cuba's greatest and most prominent musicians, and is devoted to promoting the entire tapestry of Cuban music. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available September 1.


Friday, September 23 (NOTE: Rescheduled - originally planned for Tuesday, September 6)
Julie Celona-VanGorden, In Her Words, recital
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Voice faculty member and soprano Julie Celona-VanGorden, with pianist Christy Wisuthseriwong, performs a variety of art-song with texts authored by women including Libby Larsen's song cycle "Try Me, Good King" in which the final words of five of Henry VIII's wives are set to dramatic and poignant music.  Also featured will be Edward Knight's "Tales Not Told" with texts by poet Mary Jane Alexander.  The contemporary poet speaks as different historical women including Mary Dyer, a Quaker who was hung for her beliefs in 1660, and Sara Towne Cloyce, who's sister, Rebecca Nurse, was tried at the Salem Witch Trials.  Francis Poulenc's beautiful and evocative song cycle, Fiancailles pour rire with poetry by Louise de Vilmorin, is also on the program. Sponsored by the Department of Music


Monday, September 26
Presidential Debate Watch
First Floor, Moseley Center, 9 p.m.

Elon Votes! along with the Center for Leadership, the Council on Civic Engagement, and the National Campaign for Political and Civic Education host this first of three events to inform students about the candidates and issues at stake in this November’s national election.  Additional watches will be organized around presidential debates on Sunday, October 9 and Wednesday, October 19. On Tuesday, November 8, a watch will be organized around Election Night 2016. Additional information is available at www.elon.edu/vote

Identified by the Council on Civic Engagement as an opportunity to foster student intellectual and civic engagement.



Tuesday, September 27
Cory Schantz, baritone
Brian Osborn, piano

Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Guest artists Cory Schantz and Brian Osborn will present an evening of music for voice and piano including works by Korngold, Mozart, Massenet and Sondheim. Schantz has enjoyed an active career in opera, oratorio and the concert stage.  He is currently on faculty at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia where he teaches voice and directs the opera program. Sponsored by the Department of Music


Thursday, September 29
Elon University Fall Convocation
"The Race for the White House in 2016: Bob Woodward's Critical History from Nixon to Obama"

Alumni Memorial Gymnasium, Koury Athletic Center, 3:30 p.m.

No one has written about the last eight Presidents, the CIA, war and the Supreme Court with more depth than Bob Woodward. A renowned political investigative reporter and two-time Pulitzer winner, Woodward brings an unmatched body of work to his presentations. With 18 best-selling books (12 of them #1 national best sellers from Nixon to Obama) and 44 years with The Washington Post, no one has put more practice into explaining and understanding the American presidency. Voters now face a pivotal point in history and many critical and complex uncertainties from national security to the economy. Addressing questions such as "Why has Washington leadership become so toxic?" and "What should voters not only expect - but demand - from the next President," Woodward offers a behind the scenes look at the inner workings of Washington, delving into crucial details and sharing real-time history that he has witnessed and often discovered through his reporting and research.

Identified by the Council on Civic Engagement as an opportunity to foster student intellectual and civic engagement.


Thursday, September 29
Amy-Jill Levine, “Agreeing to Disagree: How Jews and Christians Read Scripture Differently”
McBride Gathering Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, 7 p.m.

A self-described “Yankee Jewish feminist who teaches in a predominantly Christian divinity school in the buckle of the Bible Belt,” Dr. Amy-Jill Levine, University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University, will offer the Truitt Center’s annual H. Shelton Smith Lecture. Dr. Levine is author of numerous books and articles on the Bible and biblical interpretation, including Short Stories by Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi and The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus. Sponsored by a Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences Grant, the Truitt Center for Spiritual and Religious Life, the Religious Studies Department, the Jewish Studies Minor, and the Center for the Study of Religion, Culture, and Society.


Friday, September 30
Vint Cerf, "The Internet of Things"
McCrary Theatre, 3:30 p.m.

Often referred to as one of the "Fathers of the Internet," Vint Cerf is credited as the co-creator of the Internet's key networking technology (TCP/IP) protocols and the architecture of the Internet. Currently Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist for Google, Inc., Cerf will discuss the ability of everyday devices to communicate with each other as well as the security and privacy issues posed in a connected world. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available September 8. Sponsored by the School of Communications with the support of Elon University Family Weekend, University Advancement and Office of Parent Programs


Friday, September 30
The Music Department Faculty Concert
Whitley Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.

Faculty artists invite Elon families and friends to a mixed program for voice, piano, percussion, wind, brass and strings. Since 1999, this program has become a much-anticipated Family Weekend event. Sponsored by the Department of Music