Cultural Calendar, Spring 2010

February

Wednesday-Saturday, February 3-6
Department of Performing Arts presents The Time of Your Life by William Saroyan
Directed by Richard Gang
Black Box Theatre, Wednesday-Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 and 7:30 p.m.

Winner of a Pulitzer Prize and Drama Critics' Circle award, The Time of Your Life introduces strange and kindly Joe, whose search for happiness and answers to far-reaching engimas of life takes him back to Nick's waterfront saloon where his friend and errand boy, huge and simple, falls in love with a fragile lady of the evening. Wandering in and out of the saloon are vivid characters that want to get more living done and are as unsure as Joe about how to go about it.

Admission: $12 or Elon ID. Reservations are highly recommended and will be taken beginning January 27 by calling (336) 278-5650.


Thursday, February 4
Phoenix Brass
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Faculty members Stephen Futrell, Matthew Buckmaster and Kathleen Hopper are joined by James Brewer '07 and Wayne Bennett for a recital of brass quintet works and arrangements by Koetsier, Ewald, Scheidt, Cheetham and Bach. The program will include jazz favorites "Look for a Silver Lining" and "Do Nothin' Till You Hear from Me."

Sponsored by the Department of Music


Monday, February 8
Brant Schuller, opening reception
Arts West Gallery, 12-1:30 p.m.

Schuller explores the passage of time through drawing and how the method of tracing is a means to map or capture the experience of prolonged viewing. An established printmaker, Schuller is currently an associate professor of art at Millersville University. Exhibition continues until March 4.


Tuesday, February 9
Gene Bertoncini, guitar
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Bridging jazz, classical, pop and bossa nova styles, Bertoncini integrates his own spontaneous and tasteful improvisations with elegance and ease.

Admission: $12 or Elon ID. Tickets available January 21.

Elon University Lyceum Series


Thursday-Saturday, February 11-14
Department of Performing Arts presents 110 in the Shade
Written by N. Richard Nash, Music by Harvey Schmidt, Lyrics by Tom Jones
Direction and Choreography by Linda Sabo; Musical Direction by Nate Beversluis
McCrary Theatre, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m.

In a drought-stricken Texas town in the midst of a 1930's heat wave, everyone is longing for rain - except Lizzy Curry. On the verge of spinsterhood and afraid of growing old alone, Lizzie is longing for love. A charming con man comes to town promising relief, and much to his surprise, brings not only rain but love as well. A beautiful and moving score deepens the emotional power of Nash's original play, The Rainmaker, on which this musical is based.

Admission: $12 or Elon ID. Tickets available January 21.


Sunday, February 14
Department of Music Faculty Chamber Recital
Whitley Auditorium, 3 p.m.

A recital with Saint Valentine written all over it including romances by Schumann and Dvorak, a bouquet of melodies by Gabriel Fauré and a set of cheery variations by Beethoven. Faculty artists include Meaghan Skogen (cello), Virginia Novine Whittaker (saxophone), Dan Skidmore (violin), Julie Celona-Vangorden (voice), and Omri Shimron (piano).


Monday, February 15
Michele Morano, nonfiction reading
Yeager Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Part travel writer and part personal essayist, Morano explores the intersections between place and identity in her first book, Grammar Lessons: Translating a Life in Spain. A professor at DePaul University, Morano has received awards from the Rona Jaffe Foundation and the McDowelll Colony and has published work in The Georgia Review and The Missouri Review.

Sponsored by The English Department and the William Maness Fund


Monday, February 15
Burma VJ - Reporting from a Closed Country, film screening
McEwen 011, 7:30 p.m.

A tenacious band of Burmese video journalists faced down death to expose the repressive regime controlling their country and to document the 2007 street protests and extraordinary events of the "Saffron Revolution" led by Buddhist monks.

Selections from the Human Rights Watch Traveling Film Festival supported by the Elon Fund for Excellence and the Political Science department


Tuesday, February 16
Willis Delony in concert
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Delony, a professor of music, jazz studies and piano at Louisiana State University, will perform a selection of classical and jazz works. Elon University's Stephen Futrell will join Delony in a set by various composers featuring the lyrics of Johnny Mercer.

Sponsored by the Department of Music


Saturday, February 20
Remnants of a War, film screening and talk
McEwen 011, 7:30 p.m.

In the 2006 war between Hezbollah and Israel, one million cluster bomb munitions rained down upon southern Lebanon with an estimated 35 percent failing to detonate. One year later, teams of locally recruited and trained de-miners raced to clear the land before more civilians were injured or killed. The screening will be followed by a discussion with director Jawad Metni.

Selections from the Human Rights Watch Traveling Film Festival supported by the Elon Fund for Excellence and the Political Science department


Saturday, February 20
Elon University Jazz Festival Concert
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

The culmination of Elon's two-day Jazz Festival features visiting artists/clinicians Bruce Swaim, tenor saxophone; John Jensen, trombone; Steve Abshire, guitar; and Jae Sinnett, drums, with the Elon University Jazz Ensemble directed by Jon Metzger.

Sponsored by the Department of Music


Sunday, February 21
The Greatest Silence: Rape in the Congo, film screening
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center, 3 p.m.

The 2008 Sundance Film Festival Special Jury Prize for Documentary will be screened in advance of a February 25 visit and lecture by director Lisa F. Jackson (see related listing).

Sponsored by the Liberal Arts Forum and General Studies


Monday, February 22
William Chapman Nyaho, piano
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Nyaho brings a unique cultural background and extraordinary eclectic sense of music to the concert hall, propelling an evening of music to reach great heights. Presented as part of the symposium Music and Art of Africa and the African Diaspora: Rhythm, Movement, Color.

Supported by the Elon Fund for Excellence


Tuesday, February 23
Works from the Elon University African Art Collection, opening reception
Isabella Cannon Room, 5:30 p.m.

An exhibition from the university's permanent collection will be on view as part of the symposium Music and Art of Africa and the African Diaspora: Rhythm, Movement, Color. Exhibition continues through April 21.

Supported by the Elon Fund for Excellence


Wednesday, February 24
Khaled Mattawa, poetry reading
Yeager Recital Hall, 6 p.m.

Mattawa, who grew up in Libya, is the author of three poetry collections, the most recent being Amorisco. Mattawa has also translated five books of contemporary Arabic poetry.

Supported by the Elon Fund for Excellence and Middle Eastern Studies Grant


Wednesday, February 24
nicholas leichter dance
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

Drawing from traditional, contemporary, folk and popular dance forms, Nicholas Leichter choreographs vibrant multicultural narratives in which movement tells the story.

Admission: $12 or Elon ID. Tickets available February 3.

Elon University Lyceum Series


Thursday, February 25
Lisa F. Jackson, "The Greatest Silence: Rape in the Congo"
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Violence against women in times of conflict has been called one of history's greatest silences. From the combat zones of the Democratic Republic of Congo between 2006-07, Jackson speaks for tens of thousands of women and girls tortured in the country's civil war.

Sponsored by the Liberal Arts Forum and General Studies


Thursday, February 25
Zzyzx Saxophone Quartet
Yeager Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Graduates of Indiana University's Jacobs School of Music and advocates of new music, ZSQ frequently premieres works by university composers and commissioned works by prominent American composers.

Sponsored by the Department of Music


Sunday, February 28
Crude, film screening
McEwen 011, 7:30 p.m.

The epic story of the "Amazon Chernobyl" in the rainforest of Ecuador, the largest oil-related environmental lawsuit in the world and one of the most controversial legal cases of all time.

Selections from the Human Rights Watch Traveling Film Festival supported by the Elon Fund for Excellence and the Political Science department