Kontras Quartet

Thursday, February 28
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

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Ailey II

Thursday, March 7
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

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David Hamlow: Archival Structure 5: Bricks

Monday, March 18
opening reception, Arts West Gallery, 12:30 p.m.
artist talk, Yeager Recital Hall, 5:30 p.m.

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Jimmy Webb

Thursday, March 14
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

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William Chafe, “The Unfinished Journey: America Since World War II”

Tuesday, April 2
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

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Grand Night

Friday & Saturday, April 5 - 6
Yeager Recital Hall, 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.

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March

Sunday, March 3
“Thomas Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence”
McCrary Theatre, 3 p.m.

Mr. Jefferson, as portrayed by William (Bill) Barker, offers an intimate account of the writing of our nation’s founding document. Barker has portrayed Mr. Jefferson on stage, in films and for 30 years at Colonial Williamsburg.


Tuesday, March 5
Tim Hill, bass-baritone
Omri Shimron, piano
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Music of Mozart, Ibert, Brahms, and featuring the North Carolina premiere of the song cycle A Live Oak Growing by Clint Borzoni. Sponsored by the Department of Music  


Wednesday, March 6
Bryan Alexander, “Digital Humanities and Liberal Education”
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center, 7 p.m.

The Senior Fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education, Bryan Alexander speaks on the ways in which the digital humanities can affect the liberal arts institutions and how digital tools are changing the way we learn. Sponsored by the Elon Fund for Excellence.


Thursday, March 7
Jill Lepore, “The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death”
Whitley Auditorium, 4:15 p.m.

Lepore is the David Woods Kemper Professor of American History at Harvard and also a staff writer at The New Yorker. Her essays and reviews have also appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The American Scholar, and many scholarly journals. Lepore examines how recent debates about life and death before the cradle to beyond the grave have influenced the course of U.S. politics. Investigating the surprising origins of the stuff of everyday life – from board games to breast pumps – Lepore argues that the era of discovery, Darwin, and the Space Age turns ideas about life on earth topsy-turvy.  Sponsored by the NC Eta Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa and The Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar’s Program


Thursday, March 7
Ailey II
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

Ailey II is universally renowned for merging the spirit and energy of the country’s best young dance talent with the passion and creative vision of today’s most outstanding emerging choreographers.  Started in 1974, Ailey II embodies Mr. Ailey’s pioneering mission to establish an extended cultural community that provides dance performances, training and community programs for all people. Admission: $12 or Elon ID. Tickets available February 14. Elon University Lyceum Series

NOTE: Guests should be seated by 7:20 p.m. At that time, unclaimed seats will be released to waiting guests without tickets. At the company’s request, late seating is not permitted under any circumstances. 


Sunday, March 10
Linda Cykert, flute; Christopher Caliendo, guitar
Yeager Recital Hall, 3 p.m.

Cykert and Los Angeles guitarist/composer Christopher Caliendo present a delightful program of original music ranging from Tango to Gypsy Americano styles. Sponsored by the Department of Music


Monday, March 11
Christian Jobin, “How Much Should You Know About Your Intestinal Microbes?”
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

Dr. Christian Jobin’s research “focuses on the pathological consequences of dysregulated immune host response to the intestinal commensal microbiota.” His work seeks to better understand the mechanisms by which the body lives peacefully with bacteria in order to eventually design therapies to restore disrupted relationships that produce inflammation and possibly cancer. Voices of Discovery Science Speaker Series


Thursday, March 14
"Advances in Treatment and Research of Multiple Sclerosis and Transverse Myelitis: Johns Hopkins Project RESTORE"
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center, 5 p.m.

Dr. Adam Kaplin from Johns Hopkins University speaks about current research in Multiple Sclerosis and Transverse Myelitis. He is on the board of medical advisors to the Transverse Myelitis Association as well as Project RESTORE in Baltimore, MD. The evening will begin with a reception followed by Kaplin's presentation and concluding with a question and answer period. Sponsored by Elon University Neuroscience Club


Thursday, March 14
Jimmy Webb
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Best known for the instant classics he provided for Glen Campbell (“By The Time I Get To Phoenix,” “Wichita Lineman”), Richard Harris (“MacArthur Park), and the Fifth Dimension (“Up, Up and Away”), Jimmy Webb continues to write songs as carefully crafted as these early hits and reigns as one of the masters of American music. Admission: $12 or Elon ID. Tickets available February 21. Elon University Lyceum Series


Monday, March 18
David Hamlow: Archival Structure 5: Bricks
opening reception, Arts West Gallery, 12:30 p.m.
artist talk, Yeager Recital Hall, 5:30 p.m.

An installation of an unlimited edition of brick-shaped boxes created from Hamlow’s saved paperboard and vacuum-formed plastic consumer refuse. Also on display, several versions of Hamlow’s latest series Pulse: wall-and-floor-based works created using conserved Mylar food packages. The exhibition will be a collaborative effort between the artist and the students of the Elon University Art & ARH department and continues through Tuesday, April 11.


Monday, March 18
Ray Cashman, “Folklore on the Irish Border: A Voice from the Margins”
LaRose Digital Theater, Koury Business Center, 7:30 p.m.

Ray Cashman is Associate Professor of Folklore in the English department of The Ohio State University, with adjunct positions in Anthropology and Comparative Studies. He specializes in the ethnography of communication, performance studies, and the politics of culture. Having conducted extensive fieldwork in Ireland, north and south, Cashman has published on traditional customs, drama, and rites of passage; oral history, commemoration, memory, and nostalgia; and vernacular negotiations of local, ethnic, sectarian, and political identities. He is the author of Storytelling on the Northern Irish Border: Characters and Community (2008), which won the Chicago Folklore Prize from the American Folklore Society and the Donald Murphy Award from the American Conference for Irish Studies, and the co-editor (with Tom Mould and Pravina Shukla) of The Individual and Tradition: Folkloristic Perspectives (2011). Cashman will discuss his current work with an Irish storyteller who turns to traditional narratives to critique the world around him and to push back against marginalization and stigma associated with poverty. Sponsored by PERCS: Elon’s Program for Ethnographic Research and Community Studies


Tuesday, March 19
Brian Fagan, “Water: Humanity’s Elixir”
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Water provides sustenance and refreshment and is something humanity has cherished since the beginning of history. Fagan tells the fascinating story of the ever-changing relationship between humans and water during the past 10,000 years, a tale of reverence and respect for the elixir of life. Why has water become an anonymous commodity since the Industrial Revolution? Why are we in danger of running out of this most precious resource? Fagan draws lessons from the past to help us chart ways out of the hydrological crises that confront us. Sponsored by the Liberal Arts Forum