Dali Quartet - Classic Roots, Latin Passion

Thursday, February 27
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

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Moscow Festival Ballet - The Sleeping Beauty

Thursday, March 6
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

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Ian Hobson, The Adams Foundation Piano Recital

Tuesday, March 18
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

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Elon University Spring Convocation, A Conversation with President Emeritus J. Earl Danieley

Wednesday, April 2
Alumni Gym, 3:30 p.m.

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February

Wednesday-Saturday, February 5-8
Department of Performing Arts presents Much Ado About Nothing
Written by William Shakespeare, Directed by Kevin Otos
Black Box Theatre, Center for the Arts, Wednesday-Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 and 7:30 p.m.

Shakespeare’s classic comedy of love, misunderstanding and forgiveness. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Reservations are highly recommended and will be taken beginning January 16 by calling (336) 278-5650.


Friday, February 7
Embracing History to Spring Forward
Artistic Direction by Jason Aryeh
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Featuring innovative and original choreography investigating the process of the contribution of black history in our current cultural and political evolution. Choreography by Jason Aryeh, Sophie McNeil and Brenna Dames. Sponsored by the Department of Performing Arts


Sunday, February 9 
Miss Representation, film screening
Yeager Recital Hall, 2 p.m.

Featuring interviews with noted figures in politics, broadcast news and the entertainment industry, Miss Representation explores the glass ceiling that many women still struggle to break and the double standards applied to women in terms of appearance and persona. Miss Representation was an official selection at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. 85 minutes. Shown in advance of director Jennifer Siebel Newsom’s visit on February 18 (see separate listing). Sponsored by the Liberal Arts Forum


Sunday, February 9
David Ellzey, mime artist
Yeager Recital Hall, 8 p.m.

An award-winning actor, mime, transformational speaker, and best-selling author, Ellzey has performed on stages across four continents, from the United Nations to Mother Theresa’s Orphanage in India to the Stanislavsky Theater in Moscow. Seen in film, television and commercial ads, he has also won awards for his work with The Big Apple Circus Clown Care Program, using humor as a part of healing with children in hospitals. In all aspects of David’s work, he inspires audiences to laugh and celebrate a greater sense of connection to this earth, humanity and life. Sponsored by the Department of Performing Arts


Monday, February 10
John Penny: Stillness
reception, Gallery 406, Arts West, 12:30 p.m.
artist talk, Gallery 406, Arts West, 5 p.m.

Much recent attention, particularly in Europe, has been given to the question of “drawing research.” Artist John Penny sees his work and interests as being intrinsically bound up in this area. His current research is centered on the idea of “drawing with materials” – an interest that sources sculpture rather than painting to construct this area of work. Exhibition continues until Tuesday, March 11.


Tuesday, February 11
Dana Born, “Living a Legacy: Leadership and Character Development”
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

A lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government is a retired brigadier general with 30 years of service in the U.S. Air Force. From 2004-13, she served as the Dean of the Faculty for the U.S. Air Force Academy where she was also a professor and head of the Behavioral Sciences and Leadership Department. Sponsored by the Center for Leadership and the Politics Forum


Tuesday, February 11 - NOTE DATE CHANGE DUE TO WEDNESDAY'S WINTER WEATHER FORECAST
Leonard Norman Primiano, “How to Read Catholic Folk Art”
Isabella Cannon Room, 7:30 p.m.

A scholar of religion and folklore, Primiano specializes in the study of the practice of religion in everyday life—what he calls “vernacular religion”—as well as the expression of religion in popular culture and the media. He has published on a variety of subjects from the Peace Mission Movement of Father Divine to the meaning of religious kitsch to the HBO vampire drama, True Blood. Primiano will discuss the boundaries of religious folk art, its unique expression within Roman Catholic culture, and what it means to acquire and live with historical religious folk objects in the 21st century. The talk complements his exhibition, Graces Received: Painted and Metal Ex-Votos From Italy, on display in the Isabella Cannon Room through February 28. Sponsored by the Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences


Thursday – Sunday, February 13-16
Department of Performing Arts presents 1776: The Musical
Music & Lyrics by Sherman Edwards, Book by Peter Stone, Based on a concept by Sherman Edwards, Direction and Choreography by Linda Sabo, Musical Direction by Rick Church
McCrary Theatre, Center for the Arts, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, 2 p.m.

1776 is based on the events surrounding the signing of the Declaration of Independence, focusing on John Adams’ efforts to persuade his colleagues to vote for American independence and to endorse the document. Critics raved: “A most gripping musical, 1776 makes even an Englishman’s heart beat faster…the characters are most unusually full, for Mr. Stone’s book is literate, urbane and, on occasion, very amusing.” Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available January 23.


Friday, February 14
The Vagina Monologues
Whitley Auditorium, 6:30 and 9 p.m.

A performance based on V-Day founder/playwright Eve Ensler’s interviews with more than 200 women of different ages, nationalities, ethnicities and circumstances. With human and grace, the monologues celebrate women’s sexuality and strength and are performed by Elon students as part of the National V-Day campaign to stop violence. Admission: $5. Proceeds will go to CrossRoads and Family Abuse Services this year. For information, email elonfeminists@gmail.com. Sponsored by EFFECT with Women and Gender Studies


Sunday, February 16
Miss Representation, film screening
LaRose Digital Theatre, 2 p.m.

Featuring interviews with noted figures in politics, broadcast news and the entertainment industry, Miss Representation explores the glass ceiling that many women still struggle to break and the double standards applied to women in terms of appearance and persona. Miss Representation was an official selection at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. 85 minutes. Shown in advance of director Jennifer Siebel Newsom’s visit on February 18 (see separate listing). Sponsored by the Liberal Arts Forum


Tuesday, February 18
Jennifer Seibel Newsom, “The Representation Project”
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

MissRepresentation.org, is a non-profit agency launched by Jennifer Newsom in 2011 to support the mission of her acclaimed documentary. Both challenge the stereotypical depictions of women in the media and contemporary culture. Recently the organization stepped into a new name, The Representation Project, which remains true to the message of Miss Representation: stereotypes harm everyone. The project inspires individuals and communities to challenge the status quo and ultimately transform culture, so everyone, regardless of gender, race, class, age or circumstance can fulfill his or her potential. Sponsored by the Liberal Arts Forum


Wednesday, February 19
Ryan Van Meter, guest reading
Johnston Hall, 7:30 p.m. 

The author of If You Knew Then What I Know Now—a collection of personal essays about childhood, coming of age and coming out—Ryan Van Meter has published essays in The Gettysburg Review, Iowa Review, The Normal School, Fourth Genre, and Best American Essays 2009. He has been a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and teaches at the University of San Francisco. Sponsored by the English Department and the William Maness Fund


Thursday, February 20
Graces Expanded: Conversations about ex-voto by Elon faculty
Isabella Cannon Room, Center for the Arts, 6 p.m.

A discussion by Elon faculty linked to the exhibit Graces Received: Painted and Metal Ex-votos from Italy making important connections to ritual and devotion in oral, visual, and written forms, around the world and across time. Rissa Trachman (Assistant Professor of Anthropology) will talk about Maya household shrines; Evan A. Gatti (Associate Professor of Art History) will talk about painted portraits as ex voto in medieval art; and Amy Allocco (Assistant Professor of Religious Studies) will talk about offerings made in connection with vows and healing rituals honoring Hindu goddesses. Lynn Huber (Associate Professor of Religious Studies) will moderate the discussion. Sponsored in part by the Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences and the Center for the Study of Religion and Culture


Friday, February 21
Lunar New Year Celebration
McBride Gathering Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, 5:30 p.m.

Often known as Chinese New Year, this is the most important festival of the year in China and other East and Southeast Asian countries.  Come celebrate with Asian cuisine, music, rituals, and decorations to kick off the Lunar New Year. (Actual date of Lunar New Year is January 31). Sponsored by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life and the Global Education Center


Saturday, February 22
TEDxElonUniversity: Innovation into Practice
Whitley Auditorium, 1 p.m.

Elon University hosts its own TEDx event, an independently-organized version of TED talks. Four insightful and accomplished speakers will tell their stories and offer new ideas for Technology, Entertainment and Design (TED). Keeping with TEDx’s guidelines, this event will have limited seating, but all talks will be recorded and made available online. For ticket information, email TEDxElonUniversity@gmail.com


Saturday, February 22
Jose Antonio Vargas, “My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant”
McKinnon Hall, 2:40 p.m.
2014 Intersect Conference Keynote Address

A journalist for some of the most prestigious news organizations in the country, Jose Antonio Vargas’ personal journey contends with some of the most fascinating stories he’s covered. After being born and reared in the Philippines, his mother sent him to live with his grandparents in Silicon Valley to have a better life. When applying for a driver’s permit, he discovered his green card was a fake, which was confirmed by his grandfather. Vargas realized he would need to hide his true identity to avoid deportation and to pursue his dream – a career in journalism. In 2011, 18 years after arriving in America Vargas stopped running and exposed his story, “My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant,” for the New York Times Magazine, stunning media and political circles and attracting worldwide coverage. Sponsored by the Center for Leadership, the Multicultural Center and the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life


Saturday, February 22
Elon Jazz Festival Concert
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

Guest artists Jeff Phillips, piano, and Craig Whittaker, saxophone, join the Elon University Jazz Ensemble for the culminating concert of the 18th annual Jazz Festival. Elon Artist-in-Residence Jon Metzger will also be featured as the band plays swinging favorites from across the decades. Sponsored by the Department of Music


Tuesday, February 25
PEEPLI [Live] (2010), film screening
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center, 7 p.m.

A satirical dark comedy about farmer suicides in India, in the lead up to state elections in the village of Peepli, two poor farmers face losing their land due to an unpaid bank loan. Desperate, they seek help from an apathetic local politician who scornfully suggests they commit suicide to benefit from a government program that aids the families of indebted deceased farmers. When
a journalist overhears their plan, a media frenzy ignites. Sponsored by the Global Neighborhood, International Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, and Religious Studies


Monday, February 24
Southern Black Baptist Wedding
Sacred Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion,  5:30 p.m.

Have you ever wondered how weddings differ in various cultures?  Join the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life for a mock Southern Black Baptist wedding as part of Four Weddings and an Understanding.


Thursday, February 27
Dalí String Quartet, “Classic Romance – Latin Passion”
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Elon University Lyceum Series

The Dalí Quartet is a fresh voice in Classical and Latin American music. The award-winning chamber ensemble has appeared at Carnegie Hall, toured widely in Europe and Asia and collaborated with some of the finest composers of our time. Their Elon performance includes traditional string quartet (Mozart, Brahms) as well as lively tangos and Latin dance pieces. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available February 5.