Robert Bullard, “Climate Change as a Human Rights Issue: Why Equity Matters"

Tuesday, April 18
McKinnon Hall, 7:30 p.m.

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Lauren Bush Lauren, “Women at Elon: Moving Philanthropy Forward”

Thursday, May 4
Whitley Auditorium, 4:30 p.m.

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Rabbi Irwin Kula, 2017 Baccalaureate Address

Friday, May 19
Alumni Memorial Gym, 4 p.m.

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Maity Interiano ‘07, 2017 Commencement Address

Saturday, May 20
9:15 a.m.

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February

Wednesday-Saturday, February 1-4
Department of Performing Arts presents "You Can't Take It With You"
Roberts Studio Theatre, Scott Studios at Arts West, Wednesday - Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 and 7:30 p.m.
By Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman, Directed by Frederick J. Rubeck

Young Alice and Tony have fallen in love- he is from a wealthy, very conventional family, and she from an eclectic, eccentric extended family where each member marches to their own drummer. Watch the fireworks fly when the two families meet! Winner of the Pulitzer Prize - in no small part because of its compassionate and humane message about enjoying life and staying true to oneself. Admission: $13 or Elon ID.  Reservations are highly recommended and will be taken beginning January 13 by calling (336) 278-5650 or online at https://www.eventbrite.com/d/nc--elon/events/


Thursday, February 2
Eric Hall, "Translating Research to Evidence-Based Practice for Concussion Management: Elon BrainCARE"
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center, 6:30 p.m.
Elon Distinguished Scholar Lecture

Dr. Hall will discuss his research and advocacy efforts related to concussions in student-athletes at the collegiate level in the United States.  He will discuss his research regarding the influence of genetics and pre-existing factors on neurocognitive testing and recovery from injury, as well as the influence of concussion history on gait and balance. This research will lead to a discussion regarding the future of concussion management starting with concussion education and concussion disclosure to return-to-play as well as return-to-learn best practices.


Monday, February 6
Amanda Burnham. art exhibition
Artist talk and opening reception, Gallery 406, 5:30 p.m.

Burnham's drawings and large, site specific installations (which are also drawings) begin as anecdotal moments either recorded or observed in the city around her, and frequently evolve to emphasize the darkly comic and absurd. Installations are (usually) composed of hundreds of quick, gestural acrylic and flashe paint sketches made with a fat brush that are then cut and collaged onto both built armatures and the existing surfaces of a space; these are sometimes further animated with embedded lighting. The effect is somewhere between a comic book and a stage set. Exhibition runs through March 3.

With a printmaking and painting BA from Harvard and an MFA from Yale, Amanda Burnham currently teaches drawing, painting, design and contemporary theory and practice. Ms. Burnham is a very prolific and successful artist. Recent exhibitions include the Volta Art Fair (Basel, Switzerland), the Toledo Museum of Art, Benrimon Contemporary (NYC), Bridge Gallery (NYC), Christina Ray Gallery (NYC), Dorsch Gallery (Miami) and GV/AS Gallery (Brooklyn, NY). Ms. Burnham was an artist in residence at the Embassy of Foreign Artists, Geneva, Switzerland, in 2015, and has been named a Sondheim Prize semifinalist in 2012, 2013, and 2014.


Monday, February 6
Lunar New Year
McBride Gathering Space, 6:30 p.m.

Join the Asian-Pacific Student Association (APSA) as we kick off the Lunar New Year with our annual celebration! There will be games, traditional performances, fun activities and authentic Asian food. Experience the different ways that parts of Asia celebrate this time of year. Sponsored by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life with the Asian and Pacific Islander Student Association


Wednesday, February 8
Jamie Tworkowski, "Pain, Hope, Questions and Community: An Evening with To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA)"
Lakeside Meeting Rooms, 7:30 p.m.
Liberal Arts Forum Lecture

After learning that two out of three people with depression do not get help, and that the third leading cause of death among 18-24 year olds is suicide, Tworkowski founded a non-profit dedicated to helping those suffering from depression, addiction, self-injury and suicidal tendencies find hope, support and love. In 2015, a film based on TWLOHA was released, as was Tworkowski’s New York Times bestselling book, If You Feel Too Much, which was also one of 15 books nominated in Goodreads’ Choice Awards 2015 in the Best Memoir/Autobiography category.  Telling stories and talking about the importance of honesty and community in a way that is dynamic, conversational, raw, and ultimately hopeful, Tworkowski lets readers and audiences know that no matter what, "You are not alone and this is not the end of your story." Sponsored by the Liberal Arts Forum


Thursday, February 9
Rethinking Humanitarianism in a Fragmenting World: Lessons from Syria and Beyond"
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center, 7 p.m.

International humanitarian assistance is more vital than ever - yet the humanitarian aid industry is beset by both internal and external challenges that make the delivery of aid to those in need increasingly difficult. As crises multiply, aid and humanitarian assistance have been politicized - both inside donor states and within countries plagued by instability and civil war, where international aid workers have increasingly been the targets of violence.

Federico Motka, an international aid worker who spent a decade in the field, will reflect on all these challenges in the context of his experiences as a project manager "on the ground" both in Syria and elsewhere. He will present a critique of how humanitarian aid is organized and delivered in the conflict zones he worked in placing particular emphasis on the growing risks to aid workers as humanitarianism is bureaucratized and politicized - risks he experienced firsthand in Syria.

Since 2007, Mr. Motka has worked as an international humanitarian aid worker for a number of non-governmental organizations, including ACTED, Welthungerhilfe, and Impact Initiatives; he has also worked with the International Federation of Red Cross (IFRC). Mr. Motka's specialization in emergency response programming has taken him to the front lines of disaster relief and humanitarian assistance in a dozen countries, including Fiji, Sri Lanka, India, Myanmar, Pakistan, Haiti, Afghanistan, Peru, and South Sudan. Mr. Motka spent the years 2012-2014 in Jordan, Iraq, and Syria, where he worked to coordinate humanitarian aid to refugees fleeing the Syrian civil war. Dr. Joel Shelton, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Elon and a longtime colleague of Mr. Motka, will also present.


Thursday, February 9
Olga Vocal Ensemble
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.
Elon University Lyceum Series

This young five-member a cappella group approaches old traditions in a fresh way. She combines enthusiasm, humor and drama with genuine vocal clarity to enrapture both young and old. Her repertoire covers more than five centuries of musical joy, and the ensemble is already known for unique programs from Medieval Icelandic drinking songs to nostalgic hits. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available January 19.


Thursday - Sunday, February 9-12
Department of Performing Arts presents "CATS"
McCrary Theatre, Thursday & Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, 2 and 7:30 p.m.
Based on t.s. eliot's "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats" and composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Directed and choreographed by Lynne Kurdziel Formato; musical direction by Ethan Andersen, scenic design by Charles Johnson; costume design by Caitlin Graham and lighting design by Bill Webb

The iconic musical currently enjoying a successful Broadway revival is a high-energy, sung-through show featuring songs such as "Memory." Over the years, it has become the catalyst for many to pursue a life in theatre (pun intended). Appropriate for all age groups. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available January 19.


Tuesday, February 14
The Vagina Monologues
Whitley Auditorium, 6:30 and 9 p.m.

Based on V-Day founder/playwright Eve Ensler’s interviews with women of different ages, nationalities, ethnicities and circumstances, the monologues celebrate women’s sexuality and strength and are performed by Elon students as part of the National V-Day campaign to stop interpersonal violence. Admission: $5. Proceeds benefit CrossRoads of Alamance County.  Sponsored by EFFECT.  A catered reception for the cast, sponsored by WGSS, will be held between performances in West Parlor.


Wednesday, February 15
Seeing Gender: Equity, progress and challenges in 2017
Lakeside Meeting Rooms, 5:30 p.m.

There are plenty of reasons to talk about gender: the trolling of women online, HB2, the role of gender in the Presidential election, the pay gap, the media's focus on sexual assaults on college campuses, and the rape culture that perpetuates these high rates of sexual assault. This panel discussion outlines some of the key issues regarding gender in society including expectations of masculinity, micro-aggressions, media representations of gender norms, and aspects of society and campus life that contribute to gender inequities. Sponsored by the Council on Civic Engagement and EFFECT


Thursday, February 16
World Hijab Day
McBride Gathering Space, 6:30 p.m.

A reflection dinner and stories from the community on the complex cultural significance of wearing the Hijab, the head covering worn in public by some Muslim women. By opening up new pathways to understanding, World Hijab Day hopes to counteract some of the controversies surrounding why Muslim women choose to wear the hijab. Sponsored by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life and Muslim Student Association


Thursday, February 16
Susan Fetch Hahn and Katherine Thomas, alumni recital
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Elon Music Alumni Susan Fetch Hahn, soprano, and Katherine Thomas, piano, will present a recital of vocal music featuring works by Mozart, Schubert and Hahn along with selections from the American Musical Theatre. Sponsored by the Department of Music


Saturday, February 18
21st Annual Elon University Jazz Festival Concert
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

This concert is the culmination of Elon's three-day Jazz Festival.  The guest artists are jazz trombonist Rick Simerly and acoustic bassist Elisa Pruett.  They will perform with the Elon University Jazz Ensemble directed by Festival Host Rusty Smith. Sponsored by the Jazz Studies Program, the Music Department and the Office of Cultural and Special Programs


Sunday, February 19
Qu'Allah Bénisse la France (May Allah Bless France!), film screening
Global Commons Media Room 103, 2:30 p.m.
Tournées Francophone Film Festival 

In a time of global terror, mass migration and political turmoil, the theme for this year's annual festival is "Résistance," a French word connoting both the refusal to accept circumstances and the resilience to overcome them. Each film portrays characters or real people enacting "resistance" in their lives and becoming stronger in the process - a model for our own time and community.

Qu'Allah Bénisse la France is the true story of a French teenager who found redemption through Islam and music, overcoming hardships to become one of France's best-known hip hop artists.  Film shown in French with English subtitles.
Ariela Marcus-Sells (Department of Religious Studies) will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

Tournées Film Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment. Additional sponsors include Elon College of Arts and Sciences; Center for the Study of Religion, Culture and Society; Peace and Conflict Studies; The Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Muslim Life at Elon; Jewish Studies; and the Departments of English, History and Geography, Philosophy, and World Languages and Cultures.


Monday, Feb. 20, 9:25-10:35 a.m. and 12:15-1:25 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 21, 8:00-9:10 a.m. and 2:20-3:30 p.m.
Forum #4: “It's the End of the World as We Know it:  Perspectives from Different Global
Religious Traditions,” led by the Center for the Study of Religion, Culture and Society
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center

Core Forums are shared intellectual experiences that are open to all Elon students, faculty, and staff. They address important interdisciplinary topics and allow community conversations about key global issues. Each Forum is repeated four times to allow any Elon student to attend and to allow COR 110 sections to attend as a class.


Tuesday, February 21
Global Neighborhood Film Series: Waste Land
Global Commons Media Room 103, 7 p.m.

An uplifting feature documentary highlighting the transformative power of art and the beauty of the human spirit. Top-selling contemporary artist Vik Muniz takes us on an emotional journey from Jardim Gramacho, the world's largest landfill on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, to the heights of international art stardom. Vik collaborates with the brilliant catadores, pickers of recyclable materials, true Shakespearian characters who live and work in the garbage quoting Machiavelli and showing us how to recycle ourselves (IMDB). Brazil, 2011, 99 min.


Wednesday, February 22
Grigris, film screening
Global Commons Media Room 103, 7 p.m.
Tournées Francophone Film Festival

A young Chadian man with a paralyzed leg dreams of being a dancer but gets involved in trafficking to care for his ailing father. Film shown in French with English subtitles. François Masuka (Isabella Cannon Global Education Center) will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion. 

Tournées Film Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment. Additional sponsors include Elon College of Arts and Sciences; Center for the Study of Religion, Culture and Society; Peace and Conflict Studies; The Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Muslim Life at Elon; Jewish Studies; and the Departments of English, History and Geography, Philosophy, and World Languages and Cultures.


Thursday, February 23
Mindful Spirituality in Islam and the Sufi Tradition
McBride Gathering Space, 5:30 p.m.

Shaykh Muhammad Adeyinka Mendes will provide an introduction to mindful spirituality and contemplative practices in Islam with attention to Sufism in the West African tradition. Shaykh Mendes is the founding director of Sacred Service for Human Liberation in Atlanta, an organization focused on holistic spirituality, reconciliation across traditions, and mindful service within local communities. Shaykh Mendes is participating in the Ripple 2017 Interfaith Conference hosted by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life and supported by a grant from the Elon Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences.


Thursday, February 23
Loin des hommes (Far from Men), film screening
Global Commons Media Room 103, 7 p.m.
Tournées Francophone Film Festival

Two men from different backgrounds must work together to find freedom in the Atlas Mountains of Algeria. Adapted from Albert Camus' short story, The Guest.  Film shown in French with English subtitles. Ryan Johnson (Department of Philosophy) will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

Tournées Film Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment. Additional sponsors include Elon College of Arts and Sciences; Center for the Study of Religion, Culture and Society; Peace and Conflict Studies; The Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Muslim Life at Elon; Jewish Studies; and the Departments of English, History and Geography, Philosophy, and World Languages and Cultures.


Friday, February 24
Koresh Dance Company performing "Classic Koresh"
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.
Elon University Lyceum Series

A selection of favorites drawn from KDC's quarter century of innovative dance will be performed in celebration of its 25th anniversary season. Koresh repertoire classics are drawn from more than sixty existing works and include interpretations of Classical compositions by Bach, Beethoven, and Ravel, from the rolling strains of “Moonlight Sonata” to the trumpeting processions of “Bolero.” Stunning athleticism and compelling choreography appear front and center in works both old and new. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available February 3.


Friday - Sunday February 24-26
2017 Ripple Conference: Making Interfaith Happen
Numen Lumen Pavilion, Check-in begins Friday at 4 p.m.

Ripple is an Elon student-created interfaith conference that seeks to, instead of simply talk about interfaith, make interfaith happen. Participants will engage in dialogue, reflection, and training through keynote speakers, panels, and interactive breakout workshops. This year’s Ripple theme “Mindfully Plural” will explore mindfulness across traditions, Buddhism beyond belief, and pluralism in a current collegiate context. Registration/Admission: $15 for Elon faculty, staff, and students; $50 for students and $100 for faculty and staff from surrounding colleges and universities.

Register at www.therippleconference.tumblr.com. Sponsored by The Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life and supported by grants from Interfaith Youth Core, the Citrone Making a Difference Fund and Elon's Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences


Friday, February 24
An Evening with Rumi and Rabia
LaRose Digital Theater, 7:30 p.m.

Join us for an inspiring evening of Sufi poetry and Persian music. Acclaimed Rumi interpreter Peter Rogen will give performative readings of the mystic poetry of Rumi (1207-1273 CE) and Rabia (714-801 CE), with accompaniment on traditional instruments and singing provided by Amir Vehab, Yvette Gogass and Gail Niziak. Rumi's poetry is well known for its loving spirituality, and Rabia is one of the best-known female Muslim saints and Sufi mystics. This public performance is part of the Ripple 2017 Interfaith Conference. Hosted by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life and supported by a grant from Elon's Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences


Monday, February 27
La cour de Babel (School of Babel), film screening
Global Commons Media Room 103, 7 p.m.
Tournées Francophone Film Festival

A documentary that follows a group of immigrant children from all over the globe as they enter the "reception class" for their first year in the French school system. Film shown in French with English subtitles. Jeffrey Carpenter (School of Education) will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

Tournées Film Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment. Additional sponsors include Elon College of Arts and Sciences; Center for the Study of Religion, Culture and Society; Peace and Conflict Studies; The Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Muslim Life at Elon; Jewish Studies; and the Departments of English, History and Geography, Philosophy, and World Languages and Cultures.


Monday, February 27
Senzenina
Directed and choreographed by Jason Aryeh
McCrary Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

Senzenina examines South African racial segregation and white supremacy long before the apartheid. The controversial 1913 Land Act marked the beginning of territorial segregation by forcing black South Africans to live in reserves and making it illegal for them to work as sharecroppers. Resistance to apartheid within South Africa took many forms over the years, from non-violent demonstrations, protests and strikes to political action and eventually to armed resistance. Senzenina also celebrates the end of apartheid and the black South African’s release from the silent grief of the past into a hopeful future of lasting peace. Sponsored by the Department of Performing Arts


Tuesday, February 28
Mardi Gras
McBride Gathering Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, 5:30 p.m.

Students, faculty and staff are invited to the celebration of "Fat Tuesday" or Mardi Gras. The New Orleans-style party will feature chicken gumbo, beans and rice, king cake, beads and live jazz music. Learn about these traditions before the start of the Christian season of Lent. Sponsored by Catholic Campus Ministries, LEAF (Lutherans, Episcopalians, and Friends), and the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life


Tuesday, February 28
Steve Cummer, "Cloaking Light and Sound"
McCrary Theatre, 7 p.m.
Voices of Discovery Science Speaker Series

While invisibility cloaks are still the stuff of dreams, Steve Cummer's lab and other scientists are making progress in demonstrating the ability to hide or cloak objects from electromagnetic radiation and sound waves, potentially rendering them visually or acoustically hidden to the observer. From military applications to improving medical imaging or diverting city noise away from an apartment or office spaces, there are potentially limitless applications for these technologies. Dr. Cummer received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University and spent two years at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a postdoctoral research associate before joining the faculty at Duke University. He has received a National Science Foundation Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and became a Fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers in 2011.