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Inclusive Community

Common Terms

Ableism

Ableism is prejudice and/or discrimination against people with mental and/or physical disabilities.

Ageism

Ageism is prejudice and/or discrimination against people because of their age.

Anonymous Report

There are different kinds of reporting available at Elon, which depend on your level of comfort and how much information you want to share, as well as whether you want to press charges, judicially or criminally. To report an incident of interpersonal violence anonymously (as a victim or a bystander/witness), you can fill out an Anonymous Reporting Form  online, you can call SAFEline at (336) 278 - 3333 or contact the Coordinator for Violence Response. These reports help the University know how many incidents occur each year.

Anti-bias

Anti-bias is an active commitment to challenging prejudice, stereotyping and all forms of discrimination.

Anti-Semitism
Anti-Semitism is prejudice and/or discrimination against Jews. Anti-Semitism can be based on hatred against Jews because of their religious beliefs, their group membership (ethnicity) and sometimes on the erroneous belief that Jews are a "race."

Bias

Bias is an inclination or preference either for or against an individual or group that interferes with impartial judgment.

Bias Incident

Elon take its lead from the Southern Poverty Law Center, which defines a bias incident as "conduct, speech or expression motivated, in whole or in part, by bias or prejudice. It differs from a hate crime in that no criminal activity is involved." While hate crimes, if charged and prosecuted, will be dealt with in the court system as well as through our Elon policies, Elon will handle bias incidents through grievance procedures and educational programs.

Bigotry

Bigotry is an unreasonable or irrational attachment to negative stereotypes and prejudices.

Cease Contact Order (University)

A “Cease Contact Order” can prevent a student or groups of students from having any type of communication with another student. It is issued by the Office of Student Conduct. Failure for one party to adhere to terms of a Cease Contact Order will result in referral to the Honor Court and possible suspension from the University. Cease Contact Orders can be particularly useful in situations involving stalking, abusive relationships, or sexual assault, as they can help the survivor feel safer and provide distance from the person or people who have hurt them. For more information on obtaining a Cease Contact Order through Elon, please contact the Coordinator for Violence Response or the Office of Student Conduct.

Classism

Classism is prejudice and/or discrimination against people because of their real or perceived economic status.

Confidential Report

There are different kinds of reporting available at Elon, which depend on your level of comfort and how much information you want to share, as well as whether you want to press charges, judicially or criminally. To report an incident of identity -based bias or hate  confidentially (as a victim or a bystander/witness), you can call SAFEline at (336) 278 - 3333 or contact the Coordinator for Violence Response. These reports help the University know how many incidents occur each year.

Culture

Culture is the patterns of daily life learned consciously and unconsciously by a group of people. These patterns can be seen in language, governing practices, arts, customs, holiday celebrations, food, religion, dating rituals and clothing, to name a few.

Discrimination

Prohibited discrimination occurs when an individual suffers an adverse employment, academic or other decision based on protected categories.

Diversity

Diversity means different or varied. The population of the United States is made up of people from diverse "races," cultures and places.

Education Team

The Inclusive Community Education Team is composed of faculty and staff members from across campus with deep knowledge of bias issues and the ability to create educational programming to address both immediate and long term bias, discrimination and harassment related topics. The Education Team works to develop public forums that address specific topics and/or incidents, and also to provide tailored educational opportunities in the event of incidents of bias, discrimination or harassment and for on-going education.  Members of the Education Team are supported in their work by Leigh-Anne Royster, Director of Inclusive Community Wellbeing.

Official Report

There are different kinds of reporting available at Elon, which depend on your level of comfort and how much information you want to share, as well as whether you want to press charges, judicially or criminally.  A Private Report can also be filed with any staff member, where you share as much information as you want, including your name and the name of the person who harmed you. When a private report is filed, it will be sent to the Title IX Officer and staff members will investigate the incident. All reports are confidential and maintained by the Title IX Officer.

Hate Crime

Any act prohibited by law that is motivated because of the victim's actual or perceived race, nationality, ethnicity, religion, gender, disability, or sexual orientation.

Harassment

Conduct (including verbal, written, visual, or physical conduct) that denigrates or shows hostility against an individual based on his or her Protected Categories when such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with his or her work or academic performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile, humiliating, or offensive working, living or learning environment. Prohibited harassment occurs when an individual suffers an adverse employment, academic or other decision based on protected categories.

Heterosexism

Heterosexism is prejudice and/or discrimination against people who are or who are perceived to be lesbian, gay or bisexual.

Homophobia

Homophobia is the irrational fear of people who are believed to be lesbian, gay, or bisexual.

Inclusive Community Council

The Inclusive Community Council brings together faculty and staff members from across campus with a common goal of creating the best campus for all.  Their charge: To provide institutional oversight for program and policies to further a campus climate that upholds the dignity of each community member, to oversee campus-wide response and education to acts of bias, discrimination and harassment and to monitor the diversity and global engagement strategic plan. The Chairperson of the Inclusive Community Council is Brooke Barnett, Interim Associate Provost of Inclusive Community and Professor of Communications.

Multicultural

Multicultural means many or multiple cultures. The United States is multicultural because its population consists of people from many different cultures.

Non-discrimination policy

The university does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, creed, sex, national or ethnic origin, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, or veteran’s status in the recruitment and admission of students, the recruitment and employment of faculty and staff, or the operation of any of its programs.
 

Prejudice

Prejudice is prejudging or making a decision about a person or group of people without sufficient knowledge. Prejudicial thinking is frequently based on stereotypes.

Process Advocates

Process Advocates are faculty and staff members from across campus who are trained to assist students, faculty or staff who seek understanding about an instance of bias, harassment or discrimination. Advocates are supported in their work by Leigh-Anne Royster, Director  of Inclusive Community Wellbeing.  Advocates support individuals during and after the process of reporting an incident. Advocates will work across institutional departments to best advocate for individuals who have experienced bias, discrimination or harassment.

Protected Categories

Age, race, color, creed, sex, national or ethnic origin, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, or veteran’s status.

Protective Order

A protective or restraining order or protective order is a legal order issued by a state court which requires one person to stop harming another, for a variety of reasons.  In North Carolina, there are domestic violence protective orders (DVPO)/50-B and also Civil No-Contact/50-C orders.  These types of restraining orders in North Carolina depend on your relationship with the person from who you want separation. Some of these variables include if you’ve lived together or if you’re married, or if you’ve had an intimate relationship. Advocates and police officers can help you fill out the restraining order and take it to a court.

Racism

Racism is prejudice and/or discrimination against people based on the social construction of "race." Differences in physical characteristics (i.e. skin color, hair texture, eye shape) are used to support a system of inequities.

Religious bigotry

Religious bigotry is prejudice and/or discrimination against people based on their religious beliefs and/or practices.

Scapegoating

Scapegoating is blaming an individual or group for something based on that person or group's identity when, in reality, the person or group is not responsible. Prejudicial thinking and discriminatory acts can lead to scapegoating.

Secondary Survivor

A term for someone who knows a friend or family member’s story of interpersonal violence. Most of us are secondary survivors – approximately 80% of Elon students know someone who has experienced sexual assault, abusive relationships, or stalking. Don’t blame yourself for many of the feelings you have after learning that someone close to you has been abused. Sadness, confusion, anger, helplessness, fear, guilt, disappointment, shock, anxiety, desperation, and compassion are all common reactions for survivors AND their loved ones. Being aware of these emotions will ultimately help you better understand the survivor’s experience and be more supportive.

Sexism

Sexism is prejudice and/or discrimination based on gender.

Sexual Harassment

A particular type of harassment and is a form of prohibited sex discrimination. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence. Sexual harassment generally may be described to include unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other physical and expressive behavior of a sexual nature when:

  • Submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term of or a condition of education, employment, or participating in university activities;
  • Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is or could be  used as the basis for evaluation in making academic or personal decisions affecting that individual; or
  • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working, living or learning environment.

Examples of sexual harassment vary with the circumstances but may include, but are not limited to, slurs, threats, derogatory or suggestive comments, unwelcome jokes, and displays of sexually-oriented literature or pictures, unwelcome teasing or sexual advances and other similar verbal or physical conduct, including e-mail, phone calls or other online communications.  Sexual violence includes acts such as rape, acquaintance rape and other forms of non-consensual sexual activity. 

Stalking

Stalking is “…the willful and without legal purpose, repeated harassment of another; or course of conduct directly, indirectly or by third party…” which has four primary elements: (1) knowingly; (2) on more than one occasion; (3) at a specific person; (4) with intent either to: a) place in reasonable fear of safety or b) cause substantial emotional distress pertaining to death; bodily injury; or continued harassment.”

Stereotype

A stereotype is an oversimplified generalization about a person or group of people without regard for individual differences. Even seemingly positive stereotypes that link a person or group to a specific positive trait can have negative consequences
 

Survivor

(see: Victim) A term used for someone who has experienced the crime and trauma of interpersonal violence. Often used instead of “victim,” particularly when someone is healing or empowered after the violence.  Most people do not like to think of themselves as victims in any way, and it can be empowering for a survivor to refer to themselves as a “survivor” instead.

Victim

(see: Survivor) A term used for someone who has experienced the crime and trauma of interpersonal violence.

Ze and Hir

Ze and hir are gender neutral pronouns, that is they are not associated with a specific gender. Using ze (rather than he or she) and hir (rather than him or her) allows you to reference someone without assuming gender.

Sources: Anti-defamation League, Clery Act