Visionaries Multimedia

Internet Governance Policy Survey - November 2007

This Web page contains some of the qualitative written elaborations  gathered among the data in a survey of IGF participants that was fielded to measure attitudes about current and likely Internet governance policy initiatives. Responses were gathered from 206 IGF attendees, roughly 15 percent of Forum participants, representing 60 countries. The Internet Governance Forum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Nov. 12-15, 2007, was the second of five annual global events that attract stakeholders who come together to discuss issues tied to the future of information and communications technologies.  Respondents were asked to provide written elaborations about their concerns for the future of the Internet in open-ended response boxes on the survey; some chose not to reply to every question asked, so you will not find 206 responses to each question. The researchers express their thanks to survey respondents, some of whom spent up to an hour carefully considering and providing their input for this survey. The written responses were sometimes composed in a mix of languages and some were written with grammatical or syntax errors but had a discernible meaning; these have been edited to bring clarity for use on this site. Please address any inquiries about the data to predictions@elon.edu.

To return to the IGF Survey Statistics page, click here.

To return to the first IGF Rio Survey page, click here.

This page contains responses to the question on EMERGING CONCERNS. To go to other open-ended responses, click on the appropriate category below:
ANY ADDITIONAL COMMENTS/QUESTIONS
CRITICAL INTERNET RESOURCES

ACCESS
DIVERSITY
OPENNESS
SECURITY
PUBLIC POLICY
REASON TO ATTEND IGF


THE FUTURE OF GLOBAL INTERNET POLICY
Open-ended response number two

REQUEST MADE OF RESPONDENTS:

Looking at EMERGING CONCERNS, what are the most crucial future Internet public policy issues that will have to be addressed?

Finding an adequate multistakeholder model for the Internet governance in all issues concerning to the global Internet (technical, commercial, political, social, etc.).

Will commerce trump public good?

Lock-in from proprietary software vendors entering developing countries.

Internet Bill of Rights.

Maintaining the dynamism of the Internet and its openness while promoting access.
Development of a practical, global, multistakeholder regime to address ever-changing issues.

Fragmentation into national nets, see for example China.

Internationalized domain names.

Fast migration to more reliable protocols.

Harmonization of legislation.

The convergence of all media and the convergence of all communications devices.

Wide access for a cheap price.

Artificial intelligence.

There are many - surveillance and the voluntary surrendering of private information in the quest for social networks.

Splitting up of the Internet in regional sub-nets.

Censorship.

Environmental sustainability.

Pricing of bandwidth - aka, the massive use of bandwidth for recreational purposes interfering with the need of bandwidth for humanitarian and business purposes.

Personal identity management.

Computer programming.

Preserving openness.

Privacy is being invaded by people publishing video and photos.

User security.

Privacy and non-interference by governments in content control (except crime suppression).

The role of multistakeholders within ICANN's activities and the ITU's works on technical standards.

Child safety.

My concern is that IGF becomes more like a talkshop.

Global policy.

Unification of standards all over the world.

Botnet attacks on the TD|LD servers.

Governments using it for political coercion.

Security.

Child pornography and security of data.

Access. Cybersecurity. Openness.

Protection of privacy.

Free Internet.

Access.

IPv6 further adoption.

Access.

Public access x security.

Protection of privacy (log, profiling).

Convergence of technologies.

Reducing the digital divide.

The interests of companies.

Transition to IPv6.

Critical Internet resources.

Citizens' empowerment.

Security, access and cost.

Network neutrality.

Free spaces and child pornography.

Ensuring access for marginalized groups.

Access, net neutrality, censorship.

Security.

Access.

Investment (either community, government or private sector) in infrastructure development especially for developing countries.

When diversity is more widespread on the Internet, it will be more important to create policy that protects users who express ideas that do not follow state-sponsored lines of thought.

The need to define what "fair use" of Intellectual Property means in the context of the Internet.

The tension between freedom of expression and the fight against harmful content and cybercrime.

Keep United Nations and its agencies away from Internet governance.

Security.

Security, contents and regulations.

Security.

Child safety.

Participation in the governance and neutrality.

Cost.

Openness.

Harmful content, economic models.

Accessibility.

How to make Internet, a necessary condition for development, to be available to developing countries in a most affordable manner.

Security.

Government "control" vs laissez faire.

Security.

Privacy protection, freedom of expression, access, cultural diversity and security.

IpuG.

Protection of children.

Access.

Access and speed.

Balance.

Content and access.

Content.

Cheap price.

Connectivity.

Spam; fraud.

Other than changing the governance, availability is the thing that would expand the Internet. WAN technologies should help with this.

Content.

Not sure.

Security.

Linguistic diversity and protection consumer privacy and data protection in Web 2.0.

Control of trash content.

Neutrality of the network and production of multimedia communication.

The physical characteristics of the Internet are impossible to control.

Multilingualism. Security. Access.

Common agreements for controls.

Public policy, which will always be a step to the front.

Net security.

Global Internet rights.

Ensuring the freedom of expression.

Security.

Interactivity.

Security.

Access.

Privacy.

Privacy.

Digital inclusion or to be able to access all.

Freedom of expression.

Crimes, spam.

Local content development .

Security, stability and diversity.

Legal status of ICANN. Too big influence business sector. Repression of blind networks P2P. Research of new model of participation. Scientific, educational, artistique and recratifs content. Supporting that free software is an expression of freedom.

Acess, Security, Diversity, etc.

The problem of security and access must be made a priority.

Regulation.

How the Internet can continue to remain as an undivided network.

Idem.

Countries with more or less of regulation on Internet.

Establishing national and international regulations on safety.

The rights of individuals and their security.

Mastery of the technologie; education.

Cybercrime and spam.

Sovereignty of nations.

Cybercrime.

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