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Advisor Handbook

MOTIVATIONAL RESOURCES
A leader
Planting Seeds in the Garden of Life
Let's Get Rid of Management
Twelve Rules for Bringing Out the Best in People
Seven C's of Leadership
Some Leadership Thoughts

A LEADER
I went on a search to become a leader. I searched high and low. I spoke with authority and people listened, but alas, there was no one wiser than I and they followed me. I sought to inspire confidence but the crowd responded, "Why should we trust you?" I postured and assumed the look of leadership with a countenance that glowed with confidence and pride. But many passed me by and never noticed my air of elegance. I ran ahead of the others, pointing the way to new heights. I demonstrated that I knew the route to greatness. Then I looked back and I was alone. What shall I do, I queried? I have tried hard and I have used all that I know. I sat me down and pondered long. Then I listened to the voices around me. I heard what the group was trying to accomplish. I rolled up my sleeves and joined in the work. As we worked I asked, "Are we all together in what we want to do and how to get the job done?" We thought together and fought together and struggled toward the goal. I found myself encouraging the fainthearted. I sought the ideas of those too shy to speak out. I taught those who had little skill. I praised those who worked hard. When our task was completed, one of the groups turned to me and said, "This would not have been done but for your leadership." At first I said, "I didn't lead I just worked with the rest." And then I understood: leadership is not a goal. It's a way of reaching a goal. I lead best when I help others to use themselves creatively. I lead best when I forget about myself as a leader and focus on my group, their needs and their goals.

To lead is to serve. To give -- to achieve TOGETHER.
Kathryn E. Nelson

PLANTING SEEDS IN THE GARDEN OF LIFE
First, plant four rows of "P's":
Presence
Preparation
Promptness
Perseverance
Next, plant these four rows of "Let us":
Let us obey rules and regulations
Let us be true to our obligations
Let us be faithful to duty
Let us be loyal and unselfish
Then, plant three rows of "Squash":
Squash gossip
Squash indifference
Squash criticism
Finally, plant four rows of "Turn ups":
Turn up for meetings
Turn up with a smile
Turn up with new ideas
Turn up with a determination to the job
Anonymous

Let'sGet Rid of Management
A message as published in the Wall Street Journal by United Technologies Corporation.
People don't want to be managed. They want to be led. Whoever heard of a world manager? World leader, yes.
Educational leader.
Political leader.
Religious leader.
Scout leader.
Community leader.
Labor leader.
Business leader.
They lead.
They don't manage.
The carrot always wins over the stick.
Ask your horse.
You can lead your horse to water, but you can't manage him
to drink.
If you want to manage somebody, manage yourself.
Do that well and you'll be ready to stop managing.
And start leading.

TWELVE RULES FOR BRINGING OUT THE BEST IN PEOPLE

  1. Take steps to keep your own motivation high.
  2. Expect the best from people you lead.
  3. Make a thorough study of the other person's needs.
  4. Establish high standards for excellence.
  5. Create an environment where failure is not fatal.
  6. If they are going anywhere near where you want to go, climb on other people's bandwagons.
  7. Employ models to encourage success.
  8. Recognize and applaud achievement.
  9. Employ a mixture of positive and negative reinforcement.
  10. Appeal sparingly to the competitive urge.
  11. Place a premium on collaboration.
  12. Build into the group an allowance for storms.

7 C'S OF LEADERSHIP

1) COLLABORATION
2) CONSCIOUSNESS OF EFFORT
3) COMMITMENT
4) CONGRUENCE
5) COMMON PURPOSE
6) CONTROVERSY WITH CIVILTY
7) CITIZENSHIP

* REMEMBER CHANGE IS THE KEY TO IT ALL

* Borrowed from the National Collegiate Leadership Conference (Held in Michigan in August of 1996)

SOME LEADERSHIP THOUGHTS

  1. One person cannot be expected to recognize all problems, nor have all answers.
  2. Believe in the fact that a person supports what they help create.
  3. Apathy comes not from dull people but from bad leaders.
  4. To combat apathy, help people create by insuring that each is involved in a meaningful way.
  5. Respect the rights and opinions of each person.
  6. Believe in the potential of every person.
  7. Remember, a crowd of 1,000 can be broken into small groups to open the individual to involvement and commitment.
  8. Be prepared to level with others and to maintain an atmosphere where others feel free to level with you – in silence, hostility grows.
  9. There is always an answer to a problem.