EGR 121 – Grand Challenges in Engineering I

This is the first of a two-semester course sequence that focuses on the Grand Challenges in Engineering as outlined by the National Academy of Engineering, design projects, and service-learning opportunities. In the process of completing the projects, this course explores engineering disciplines, professional practices, project management, graphics and solid modeling, design processes, ethics, teamwork, communication, and a sense of an engineer’s commitment and service to society. Engineering students must take both fall and spring semesters.

Credits: 3 sh
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None
Offered: fall

EGR122 – Introduction to Matlab

An introduction to Matlab and its utility, with a focus on engineering applications. Topics will include basic programming concepts, scripts, variables, 1- and 2-D arrays, data plotting and visualization, and basic numerical methods such as solving systems of equations.

Credits: 2 sh
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: Calculus I (MTH 151)
Offered: fall

EGR 123 – Grand Challenges in Engineering II

This is the second of a two-semester course sequence that focuses on the Grand Challenges in Engineering as outlined by the National Academy of Engineering, design projects, and service-learning opportunities. In the process of completing the projects, this course explores engineering disciplines, professional practices, project management, graphics and solid modeling, design processes, ethics, teamwork, communication, and a sense of an engineer’s commitment and service to society. Engineering students must take both fall and spring semesters.

Credits: 2 sh
PreRequisite: none
Corequisite: None
Offered: spring

EGR 206 – Engineering Mechanics – Statics

This course is designed to introduce students to the effects of forces on bodies in static equilibrium and to familiarize them with mathematical techniques for finding reactive forces in bodies, frames, mechanics and trusses. Concepts covered include forces, moments, couples, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroids, moments of inertia and friction resistance.

Pre-requisites: University Physics I (PHY 221)
Credits: 3 sh
Prerequisite: University Physics I (PHY 221)
Corequisite: Calculus II (MTH 251)
Offered: fall

EGR 208 – Engineering Mechanics – Dynamics

Kinematics and kinetics of particles in rectangular, cylindrical and curvilinear coordinate systems; energy and momentum methods for particles; kinetics of systems of particles; kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; and motion relative to rotating coordinate systems are studied.

Credits: 3 sh
Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics – Statics (EGR 206) and Calculus II (MTH 251)
Corequisite: MTH 252
Offered: spring

EGR 211 – Circuit Analysis

This course is an introduction to the theory, analysis and design of electric circuits. Studies include circuit parameters and elements: voltage, current, power, energy, resistance, capacitance and inductance. Also included is the application of Kirchhoff’s laws to simple and complex circuits, techniques of circuit analysis, the op-amp, the responses of RL, RC and RLC circuits, and an introduction to sinusoidal steady-state analysis, Laplace transforms and Fourier series.

Credits: 3 sh
Cross Listed Courses: PHY 321
Prerequisite: MTH 359 and PHY 222
Corequisite: EGR 212/PHY 322

EGR 212 – Circuit Analysis Lab

This course involves laboratory application of concepts and principles discussed in EGR 211.

Credits: 1 sh
Cross Listed Courses: PHY 322
Corequisite: EGR 211/PHY 321

EGR 221-SL – Engineering Design for Service

Engineering professionals are committed to serving the needs of others and considering the well-being of those whom they serve. Students will work in small teams to apply the engineering design process to design devices or systems to aid a client in the local community. The clients will be identified through community partnerships with local non-profit organizations.The team project work is enhanced with lectures, readings, and/or class discussions on formal engineering design techniques, human-centered design, teamwork, community engagement, ethical and social responsibility, and oral and written communication. Selected projects may be continued as undergraduate research. This course may count towards the fulfillment of the Experiential Learning Requirement.

Credits: 3 sh
Prerequisite: Grand Challenges in Engineering I (EGR 121) and Grand Challenges in Engineering II (EGR 123)
Corequisite: None
Offered: fall

EGR 226 – Structure and Properties of Materials

This course introduces students to basic principles in materials science and engineering and establishes an understanding of structure-property relations in engineering materials. Atomic bonding and microstructure will be examined for properties ranging from mechanical, thermal, electrical, optical, magnetic, and chemical. Students will gain a broad perspective and knowledge of materials used in modern society.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite: University Physics I (PHY 221), General Chemistry I (CHM 111), Engineering Mechanics: Statics (EGR 206)
Corequisite: None
Offered: spring

EGR 306 – Mechanics Of Solids

This course focuses on elementary analysis of deformable solids subjected to force systems. Concepts covered include stress and strain (one-, two- and three-dimensional stress-strain relationships for the linear elastic solid); statically determinate and indeterminate axial force, torsion and bending members; stress transformations; pressure vessels; and combined loadings. There is also an introduction to column buckling.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite: EGR 206 and MTH 252

EGR 308 – Fluid Mechanics

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of fluid statics and dynamics including integral and differential control volume analysis using conservation equations, application of dimensional analysis, dynamic similitude, steady-state laminar viscous flow, and turbulent flow.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite:  Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics (EGR 208) or Classical Mechanics (PHY 401)
Corequisite: Differential Equations (MTH 351)
Offered: fall

EGR 310 – Engineering Thermodynamics

This course introduces the concept of energy and the laws governing the transfers and transformations of energy. Study emphasizes thermodynamic properties and First and Second Law analysis of systems and control volumes. Integration of these concepts into the analysis of basic power cycles is introduced.

Credits: 4 sh
Cross Listed Courses: PHY 310
Prerequisite: MTH 359 and PHY 222

EGR 321 – Robotics

This course introduces students to the basics of robotics. Students will work in groups to design, construct, and program robots to complete specific challenges. The robots will be able to complete some tasks independently and other more sophisticated tasks with the assistance of remote operators. The course is highly interactive and hands – on, including the mechanical assembly and wiring of robots and simple electrical circuits. In addition, software development will be a major part in getting the robots operational.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite:  Computer Science I (CSC 130) and Junior standing
Corequisite: Differential Equations (MTH 351)
Offered: fall

EGR 330 – Bioinstrumentation and Imaging

This course focuses on the physical principles underlying diagnostic medical systems. Concepts covered include the origin of biopotentials, circuit analysis, data acquisition, signal processing, and graphical user interfaces. These concepts will be incorporated into the study of electrode and amplifier design, electrocardiography, electromyography, electroencephalography, electroporation, functional electrical stimulation, blood flow measurements, and ultrasound imaging.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite:  Circuit Analysis and Laboratory (EGR 211&212)
Corequisite: none
Offered: spring

EGR 336 – Signals and Systems

Systems analysis plays a critical role in interpreting biological data, designing medical equipment, and understanding complex biological processes. Systems problems are emerging as central to all areas of biomedicine—including but not limited to cancer, immunology, infectious disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and cardiology. The overarching goal of this course is to promote quantitative thinking from a systems perspective. To this end, we will learn analytical approaches for modeling signals and systems and apply them to solve real-world biomedical problems, such as predicting tumor growth, analyzing ECG signals, and processing medical images.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite:  Differential Equations (MTH 351), Computer Science I (CSC 130), University Physics I (PHY 221)
Corequisite: none
Offered: spring

EGR 346 – Microelectronic Devices and Circuits

This is an introductory course to microelectronic devices, sensors, and integrated circuits. Students will gain understanding of materials and semiconductors used in solid state devices. Principles of p-n junction diodes and MOSFET and BJT transistors will be studied. Fundamentals of integrated circuits comprised of solid-state devices will be discussed.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite:  University Physics II (PHY 222), General Chemistry I (CHM 111), Circuit Analysis and Laboratory (EGR 211&212)
Corequisite: none
Offered: spring

EGR 348 – Digital Systems

This course instructs students in the fundamentals of digital logic devices and circuits. The course will discuss binary numbers and codes, logic gates and digital signals, and combinatorial and sequential logic circuit design. This provides an understanding of computer architecture and design.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite:  University Physics II (PHY 222), Circuit Analysis and Laboratory (EGR 211&212)
Corequisite: none
Offered: spring

EGR 381 – Internship In Engineering

The internship provides advanced work experiences in some aspect of engineering. It is offered on an individual basis, under the guidance of the engineering program director, when suitable opportunities can be arranged. It will typically be taken in the summer of the sophomore year. This experience will broaden the practical work experience of the student and enhance his/her classroom abilities.

Credits: 1-4 sh
Prerequisite: Permission of the program director.

EGR 421/422 – Senior Engineering Design I and II

This two-semester capstone course demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired from Elon’s engineering program. The student will undertake an original project of his/her choice, upon approval by the instructor and possibly under the supervision of a secondary mentor approved by the course instructor. A technical poster presentation marks the end of the first semester.  Culmination of this independent work will involve the writing of a comprehensive engineering design report and presentation to a faculty committee at the end of the second semester. The written document will undergo peer review at a level of standards acceptable for engineering journal publication.

Credits: 2 sh / 2 sh
Prerequisite: Research Methods I and II (PHY 397&398)
Corequisite: none
Offered: fall and spring

EGR 499 – Research

This semester-long supervised research project involves experimental, numerical or theoretical investigation of a single problem, culminating in a detailed report describing the methods, results and analysis performed including a publication-style abstract of the research.

Credits: 1-4 sh


Experimental Course Descriptions

EGR 171 – Materials in Your World

This course examines the nature of materials and significant advances that have excelled human society. Students explore the origin of the Earth – its elemental and mineral composition, the advent of the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages in early human history and advanced materials in the Modern Era. In-class activities and course projects provide students with direct observation of the amazing breadth of materials properties. Laboratory included.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite: none
Corequisite: none

EGR 173 – World of Light

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of light and its importance in a variety of fields. The role of light in nature, art, industry, medicine, and science will be explored, as well as its societal impacts. In addition to lecture activities, the course will include laboratory exercises designed to engage students in connecting ideas from optics, the study of light, to real-world applications. Upon completion of the course, students will understand the basic science of light, have an appreciation for how this knowledge has shaped our society, and realize the likely implications of new light technologies on our future. Laboratory included.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite: none
Corequisite: none

EGR 174 – Understanding Great Structures

We can mark civilization’s evolution by observing the structures it creates, uses, and which it surrounds itself with; structures such as towers, domes, dams, bridges (old and excitingly new) and much more. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts used by engineers to create these structures. Simple principles will help explain “why do they not fall down.” New materials and analytic techniques have enabled these creations to cross from purely functional to also now to be considered works of art. The studied structures themselves and the analytical logic used in their creation will expand our observational skills and introduce wonder. Understanding the design techniques, challenge, effort and accomplishment associated with these creations will be both stimulating and enriching.

Credits: 4 sh
Prerequisite: none
Corequisite: none