Application Form and Other Materials


Below are links for all the forms you will need.  NOTE: We learn from experience and try to improve the program based on what we have learned.  Therefore, these forms are revised annually.  Be absolutely sure that you, your mentor, and your recommender are using the current forms!

All materials -- your application and the letters of recommendation -- must be submitted by the posted deadline for your proposal to be considered.   All material is to be submitted electronically to the Lumen Prize office at lumenprize@elon.edu.  Keep a saved copy of your application for your own records.  Please note that the deadline for all materials is Wednesday, 12:00 noon, March 15, 2017.  

Application Form
Interested and eligible students should download and review this form carefully. You are strongly encouraged to meet with the person you hope to serve as your mentor as early in the process as possible. Please note that the completed form will require both of your electronic signatures [full names typed where indicated].

Mentor's Letter of Recommendation
This is the form to be submitted by the mentor of the applicant for a Lumen Prize. Your efforts in addressing the requested information clearly and thoroughly are appreciated. For more information about your role as a mentor to a Lumen Scholar, please review the document immediately below.

Information for Mentors
This document provides detailed information for mentors including who is eligible to serve as a mentor, the compensation policy associated with mentoring a Lumen Scholar, and the program’s expectations concerning the responsibilities the mentor has toward his or her Scholar.

Letter of Recommendation
The letter of recommendation is the second of the two letters of support applicants arrange to have submitted. [The mentor's letter of recommendation is the first.] Applicants are advised to select an individual who can best speak to their accomplishments and potential, but they are further advised that having recommendations with more than a single perspective can strengthen applications. That is, a recommendation coming from someone in a different department or program within the university than the mentor, or from outside of Elon, might be the best complement to the mentor's letter of recommendation.  Choosing one's recommender wisely is part of preparing an outstanding application packet.  

For More Information

Dr. Ann J. Cahill
Professor of Philosophy
Spence Pavilion 111
2340 Campus Box
Elon, NC 27244
Phone: (336) 278-5703
cahilla@elon.edu

News

Elon math department has strong showing at MathFest, with Lumen scholar taking home award

Peter Jakes '17, Professor Jeff Clark, Assistant Professor Aaron Trocki, and A.L. Hook Associate Professor Chad Awtrey gave presentations at MathFest in Columbus, OH, on Aug. 3-6, 2016.

Elon names 2016 Lumen Scholars 

The university’s top award for undergraduate scholars comes with $15,000 to support and celebrate academic and creative achievements. 

Challenging traditional diversity discourse in higher education 

Elon senior Claire Lockard used the Lumen Prize, the university’s top award for undergraduate research and creative achievement, to reconceptualize what is meant by "identity" and reimagine the possibilities for diversity on college campuses.

Exposing pre-Olympic human rights abuses in Rio de Janeiro

Elon University Lumen Scholar Michelle Alfini visited Rio de Janeiro to analyze the media’s lacking coverage of human rights violations prior to this year’s Olympic Games and fill the void in coverage through her website, RightingRio.com.

Math majors and faculty present at the national Joint Mathematics Meetings

Peter Jakes '17, Michael Keenan '16, Sara Rodgers '16, Jesi Weed '16, Professor Jeff Clark, Professor Crista Arangala, and A.L. Hook Assistant Professor Chad Awtrey presented at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in Seattle from Jan. 6-9, 2016.

Mapping the universe through computer modeling

Elon senior Helen Meskhidze, a recent finalist for the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship, is using the university’s top prize for undergraduate research and creative achievement to help astrophysicists study galaxies that create stars at rates far greater than average.