ANT314- Native Americans of NC Piedmont

Jo Aldred, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

Utilizing contact resources and archaeological evidence this course examines the ethnohistory and ethnology of Piedmont Siouan Indians. Topics covered include social structure, subsistence patterns, mortuary practices, lithic traditions, processes of acculturation and the recent resurgence of ethnic identity among local Native Americans. The course concludes with field research at a local precontact archaeological site.

ANT380- The Ancient Maya

Christopher Cameron, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Politics; Media

The class will address specifically the culture or civilization of the ancient Maya through archaeological remains, art, architecture, and ethnohistoric documentation. Students will be introduced to the origins of Maya civilization through the peak of Maya civilization, along with the collapse and colonial contact with the Maya. Along with the chronological perspective of these developments, an additional thematic approach will also be taken to the course. A few important themes to be addressed in the course include ancient Maya politics, economics, social organization, religion, art, architecture, technology, and material culture.

ANT383- The Anthropology of Everyday: From the Ordinary to the Extraordinary

Anne Bolin, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

From the Ordinary to the Extraordinary uses the lens of cultural anthropology to inform and energize the everyday world around you. In this course students will learn how core anthropological concepts can be applied to everyday life and used to solve problems in living. They will be introduced to ethnographic methods to explore diverse themes including American culture and food, consumer anthropology, the culture of the university, hometown studies, culture and identity among others.

ART113- Three-Dimensional Design

Michael Sanford, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

This introduction to the fundamental principles and processes of three-dimensional design uses a variety of traditional and non-traditional media with an emphasis on problem-solving, craftsmanship, creative exploration and effective use of the language of art.

ART210- Approaches to Drawing: Painted Drawings, Watercolor, and Ink as Drawing Technique

Mark Iwinski, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course concentrates on drawing with watercolor, pen and ink. It is an all levels course presuming no previous watercolor experience. Watercolor has a long and varied tradition stretching back to the Renaissance and has been used for centuries by explorers, amateurs, and visual artists. We will build from the ground up with processes and materials as we proceed through a range of color studies and techniques. You will learn about how to use various brushes, pigments and color schemes while developing your own palette. Less a
painting class we will see how watercolor is one of those hybrid mediums that can be both a drawing and a painting.

ART261- Experiments in Photography

Young Kim, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course is designed to explore imagery through traditional, digital, and alternative processes in photography such as pinhole camera, photogram, and tableau. Imagination and discovery with and beyond the camera will be used to explore the principle of photography for personal expression. The goal of this course is to translate into photographic art that which personifies the student’s perceptions and desires of the world around them.

ART270- Silkscreen

Michael Fels, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course is an introduction to water-based screen printing. In this course we will cover basic equipment, printing techniques, printing papers, stenciling processes, photographic and digital techniques, as well as contemporary and historical artists and print works as they pertain to each project. In addition, students will be encouraged to explore the versatility of the medium through its use of materials and processes. A continued development of one’s content and aesthetic awareness through the possibilities of screen printing as a fine art
medium will be emphasized.

ART274- The Photo Book

Benjamin Alper, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Even in the midst of our largely digital age, or perhaps because of it, the photo book has prevailed as an incredibly prevalent form of expression. The beginning of the 21st century has seen an explosion of photo book production, one that is increasingly more expanded and global. This studio class will examine the history, social impact and numerous formal and artistic manifestations of the photo book, both historically and today. Time will be spent looking at, talking about and analyzing their construction, editing and sequencing. The culmination of this exploration will then result in the making of a handmade book object comprised of photographs made or appropriated during our time together. While this course explores both the history and context of the photo book, it requires no previous knowledge of this field nor expertise in the making of photographs.

BIO105- Weapon and Warrior

Jennifer Nunez, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Health

Understanding our body’s physiology is not only useful in life, but also in death. Did you know that knowing how your stomach breaks down starch can solve a murder? Or that poison was the murder weapon of choice for centuries, until we had a better understanding of the biochemical processes of our bodies and the ability to detect it? Forensic science did not even exist before the 1900s, and as our knowledge about toxicology and human physiology grew, so did our ability to catch a criminal. In this course, we will explore fascinating
yet macabre tales of “chemical crimes” and murder across the centuries, and with each real life experience, explore the biological underpinnings of each victim’s demise, as well as the science that helped solve the crimes.
Is there a better way to explore your body’s limits and vulnerabilities, than by using your knowledge of biology, to catch a killer?

BIO105- Personalized Medicine

David Parker, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Health

You are undoubtedly a unique individual full of your own thoughts, hopes, dreams, strengths, and weaknesses that make you who you are. Yet your core biological make-up, your DNA, is 99.9% identical to all other humans. This tiny genetic variation has a dramatic impact on your health and which preventative and therapeutic options might be right for you in the future. The sequencing of the human genome and efforts to characterize human genetic variation have paved the way for a new understanding of an individuals’ disease risk and likely
response to treatment. In this course, we will cover basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics and genomics, and study how advances in DNA technology and our understanding of genetic variation are making it possible to create a new level of personalized diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. We will also discuss ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding personalized medicine and DNA technology.

BIO105- Biology and Art of Fitness

Matthew Clark, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Health

This course covers the basic biological components of fitness. These components encumber age-related biological processes and means correlated to changes that occur and impact one’s abilities to maintain quality levels of fitness. Students will learn some biological changes prompted by life impacts (foods, life style and activities, genetics, and diseases) that debilitate or enhances quality levels fitness. In addition, the Art of Fitness will be evaluated and discuss using photographic and technological imagery. Student will complete an in class
Biological Art group projects related to fitness. This exercise will enlighten the entire class on the variability of methods and updates that are involved in establishing quality fitness at different ages. No prerequisite require

BIO105- The Past, Present, and Future of Food and Fiber Production

Carl Niedziela, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Health

The growth and development of modern civilization is directly correlated to the advancement in man’s ability to feed and cloth himself. This course will look at the history and science behind the development of modern agriculture; the environmental, social, and economic impacts; and potential directions that food and fiber production may take in the future. The course will include some field trips to local agriculture businesses.

BIO370- Principles of Biochemistry

Tonya Train, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health

This is a one-semester course that focuses on the major themes of biochemistry within a biological context. There will be special emphasis on protein structure/function, enzyme kinetics and on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. To facilitate an in-depth understanding of these fundamental principles, we will explore specific cases where abnormal biochemical processes result in disease. In addition to case studies the course will use a variety of teaching styles from traditional lecture to team-based problem solving. This course was designed with
those interested in the allied health professions (such as PA or Nursing) in mind. Students considering medical/dental/veterinary tracks are encouraged to take the lab-based Chm/Chml 351 Biochemistry 1. Prerequisites: BIO111, CHM112, and one course from either CHM211 or BIO245, and at least 3rd year standing.

CHM173- Science and the Media

Victoria Moore, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

Scientific literacy is important for public understanding and discussion on topics such as energy policy, climate change, stem cell research, drug companies and their products, among many others. How science is covered and portrayed in the media directly contributes to science literacy. Science and the Media will explore how science is conveyed in literature, film and popular press, such as newspapers and magazines. The validity of the chemistry, biology and physics facts presented in the specific media items included in the course will also be discussed and evaluated. Satisfies COR non-laboratory science requirement.

CHN121- Elementary Chinese I

Xuanzi Zhang, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

This course is designed for students who have never studied Chinese before or who have had very little exposure to the language. Students learn the Chinese sound system, approximately 150 basic Chinese characters, as well as vocabulary and grammar with which they can fulfill basic conversational needs. Listening and speaking are emphasized through in-class interaction, and cultural knowledge as related to the language is also integrated into the course. Proficiency goal on the ACTFL scale: Novice Mid.

COM100- Communications in a Global Age

Richard Landesberg, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media; Politics; Intercultural Engagement

Contemporary media play a vital role in society. In this course, students study the importance of books, newspapers, magazines, recordings, movies, radio, television, the Internet and mobile media, and the messages carried through news, public relations and advertising. The course emphasizes the relationship of media and democracy, ethical decision-making, the diversity of audiences, and the global impact of communications.

COM100- Communications in a Global Age

Alexander Luchsinger, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media; Politics; Intercultural Engagement

Contemporary media play a vital role in society. In this course, students study the importance of books, newspapers, magazines, recordings, movies, radio, television, the Internet and mobile media, and the messages carried through news, public relations and advertising. The course emphasizes the relationship of media and democracy, ethical decision-making, the diversity of audiences, and the global impact of communications.

COM110- Media Writing

Carolyn Desalu, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Clear, logical writing is necessary to communicate effectively with an audience. This course focuses on background research, interviews, accuracy, attribution and styles of writing (print, broadcast, online, news releases). Grammar and language skills are refined, and Associated Press style is introduced.

COM110- Media Writing

Elma Sabo, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Clear, logical writing is necessary to communicate effectively with an audience. This course focuses on background research, interviews, accuracy, attribution and styles of writing (print, broadcast, online, news releases). Grammar and language skills are refined, and Associated Press style is introduced.

COM110- Media Writing

Michael Skube, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Clear, logical writing is necessary to communicate effectively with an audience. This course focuses on background research, interviews, accuracy, attribution and styles of writing (print, broadcast, online, news releases). Grammar and language skills are refined, and Associated Press style is introduced.

COM220- Creating Multimedia Content

Ryan Witt, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

Media content comes in many forms: text, photos, graphics, audio and video. In this course, students learn principles of aural and visual design, acquire knowledge of media production techniques, and create accessible content for the web and traditional media. The course features units on photography, audio and video recording and editing, and online content management.

COM312- Strategic Writing

John Doorley, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course emphasizes the importance of writing in public relations, advertising and media relations. Informative and persuasive methods include news releases, backgrounders, speech writing, employee publications, annual reports, news conferences, multimedia, public service announcements, and oral presentations to a variety of audiences.

COM319- Communicating Media Insights

William Moner, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

Writing is a central component for effectively communicating media research. Through research reports, policy briefs and executive summaries, students develop writing skills to report media research and create media messages. Topics include communicating online and social media measurement procedures, the relationship between words and data, and recommendations for effective decision-making.

COM342- Sports Information

Daniel Haygood, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course focuses on the writing and organizational skills essential for journalistic and public relations functions related to collegiate, professional and Olympic sports coverage. The functions of sports information are closely related to media coverage and may include the operation of sporting events.

COM358- Design of Visual Images

Benjamin Hannam, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Students apply principles of visual and graphic design in producing media content. Examples include publications, advertisements, logos and graphics. Students critique professional graphic design and solve visual problems involving typography, illustrations, photographs, and design for traditional and interactive media.

COM400-Media Law and Ethics

Jonathan Jones, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media; Politics

The First Amendment is the philosophical foundation for freedom of speech and press in America. This course distinguishes between forms of communication that have constitutional protection and those with limitations (libel, privacy, copyright, censorship, commercial speech, broadcast licensing, access to information). Students explore the foundations of moral reasoning and apply ethical responsibilities to communications cases.

COM452- Strategic Campaigns

William Anderson, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

Students apply strategies and techniques to create a communications campaign for real clients. In the process, students engage in audience analysis, budget preparation, and development of a strategic plan for corporate, nonprofit, association and/or government clients. Capstone course in the Strategic Communications major.

COR302- Italian Cinema

Samuele Pardini, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media; Politics

Italy has given human civilization among its most precious works of art (The Sistine Chapel, The Mona Lisa); literature (Dante, Calvino); political science (Machiavelli, Gramsci); music (Verdi, Puccini); science (Galileo, Volta); cars and design (Ferrari, Lamborghini); films (Rossellini, Fellini); and, of course, pizza. Unfortunately (or maybe it’s because of that?), it has also given civilization one other thing: the Mafia. The Mafia is a very complicated thing. It is cultural, economic, financial, historical, sociological, geographical, linguistic, national, international, and VERY political phenomenon. It has to do with issues concerning class, gender, the family. This course will look at the Mafia through the prism of Italian and Italian-American films, trying to discern the differences, especially the difference between myth and reality. We will accompany, so to speak, our movies with some literary, political, historical, and critical readings in order to read these movies in a comparative fashion and in their historical context. Films will include Rossellini’s spectacular version of Tommasi di Lampedusa’s The Leopard, Alberto Lattuada’s Il Mafioso, Francesco Rosi’s Hands over the City and Salvatore Giuliano, Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather I and II, Martin Scorsese’s Casino, Matteo Garrone’s Gomorrah, Marco Turco’s Excellent Cadavers, as well as one episode of The Sopranos.

COR307-The Future Now

Janna Anderson, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media; Politics

What does the future hold for humankind? This course explores the social, economic and political implications of the future now being projected by experts in all fields of study. Learn how to recognize, evaluate and work to adapt to expected future realities in an age in which nested networks influence everything (Facebook, the interstate highway system, sustainable resources, etc.) to a greater degree than ever before. Build new paradigms, engage in an intriguing quest for foresight and prepare yourself to work toward the best future possible as you synthesize a better understanding of the impact of accelerating change.

COR308- Healthcare Strategies for the 21st Century

Robert Stevens, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Health

This course will focus on how strategic health care marketing management can be used to solve health care problems. The course examines how different markets define value and how health care service and product providers use innovation to meet market needs. It will also explore how the marketing mix (product, price, place, and promotion) is effectively managed in different types of health care organizations. The course is highly interactive. Students will work in teams to develop “live” marketing plans for a local health care organization.

COR310: The Museum Collection: Material Cultural and the Creation of Meaning

Ethan Moore, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media; Politics

This seminar will introduce students to the practice of managing objects within a museum context including: collections development, accepted museum registration methods, cataloging, condition reporting, caring for the collection, and an exploration of ethical and philosophical concerns with museum collections. Once students have been familiarized with collections policy and practice, they will examine how, through the presentation of objects, museums can (and do) create meaning. Course readings will include sources specific to the care, presentation, and management of museum collections as well as material culture theory, art criticism, reflections on the power of interpretation, and the process of exhibiting “culture” and history.

COR323- Work and Society in a Globally Networked Age

Tony LeTrent-Jones, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media; Politics

In this course, we will explore the changing nature of work from a socio-historical perspective in which particular emphasis will be placed on current trends and the resulting societal implications in our global age of an increasingly globally networked economy. In the process, we will look at how work has been created, organized, performed, valued and compensated at different points in history. The course will also include exploration into credentialing and hiring practices related to issues of education, skills, experience, gender, race, class, etc. The overarching goal of the course will be for students to have a better understanding of work and the implications of current work-related trends within the larger socio-historical context.

COR333- Religion and Arts of Asia

Pamela Winfield, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

This course explores the symbiosis of religious thought and expression in the pan-Asian sphere. It investigates the history of Indian, Chinese and Japanese religious art and architecture and considers Asia’s contemporary material and popular culture as both expressions of and constructions for the sacred.

COR342- Understanding Educational Disparities in the United States

Kathryn Rouse, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Politics; Intercultural Engagement

Since the Coleman Report of 1966, the “academic achievement gap” has been as the heart of education policy. Drawing on research and evidence from the fields of economics, education, sociology, psychology and public policy, we will critically analyze the causes, consequences and potential solutions to academic achievement gaps in the United States. The course will begin with a critical look at the determinants of educational success. Then, we will use this research to help us better understand the causes of existing achievement gaps. Finally, we will study various education policies and debates and use our research to evaluate these policy initiatives. Course material will include readings from economics, education, psychology and policy journals, popular press articles, video clips and documentaries. Students will also read Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers.

COR384- Kennedy Assassination in Film

William Johnson, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Politics; Media

This course will explore the details of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the way it has been presented in film. Special emphasis will be placed on the study of the assassination as a film genre and any residual effects on the world of motion pictures. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study.

COR415- Why Were These Books Banned

Ren Bryan, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media; Politics

Who controls what we read and view in the United States? How does the First Amendment of the Constitution protect our rights for accessing books and films? Where does it fall short? Under what context(s) has censorship been necessary and/or misused? This interdisciplinary seminar will examine a diverse array of banned books and controversial films throughout the history of the United States. Governmental decisions for banning media, as well as books banned by school districts and communities will be studied. Using historical, sociological, and political lenses, students will read/view and examine a variety of banned books and controversial films. Topics will include the freedom to read, the First Amendment, dynamics of power, the creation of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), democracy and its implications, morality, and access for all demographics. Implications for policy will be made regarding the future of banning books and films. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study.

COR416- Wealth and Poverty

Toddie Peters, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health; Politics; Intercultural Engagement

This course will focus on the profound disparity between people who live in wealth and people who live in poverty at the beginning of the 21st century. Particular attention will be paid to moral responsibility and accountability of people in the First World to the problems of global inequality. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study. Counts toward Peace and Conflict Studies and Poverty and Social Justice minors.

COR435- Art Through a Mathematical Lens

Karen Yokley, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course provides an introduction to the connections between mathematics and visual arts. Topics may include the golden ratio, geometry, tessellations, computer-generated animation, and fractals, and students will explore how each of these topics influences (and is influenced by) works of art. This introduction to the connections between mathematics and visual arts is designed to highlight how the two subjects affect perception and shape our individual viewpoints. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study.

DAN341- Dance in Worship

Jane Wellford, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media

This course is an exploration of the role of dance in worship in a variety of cultures from primitive ancient rituals through 21st-century contemporary worship. Although a lecture course, students will at times be active participants in various forms of sacred dance. Students will also learn of the history and theory of dance as a form of worship. This course is for dancers and nondancers.

ECO317- Gender and Development

Tonmoy Islam, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Politics

This course is designed to help students investigate the economic status of women in the labor market, how that role has changed over time and the differences between labor market outcomes for both men and women. It involves a comparison of women and men with respect to labor supply (market and nonmarket work), wage rates, occupational choices, unemployment levels, and the changing role of work and family. Topics include discrimination, pay inequity, occupational segregation, traditional and nontraditional work, resource ownership, poverty, race, the global economic status of women and public policy issues, such as comparable worth and family-friendly policies designed to bridge the gap between women and men.

EDU211- Education and Society

Mark Enfield, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Politics

The field of education is ripe with potential and fraught with controversy. This interdisciplinary course examines a variety of historical, socio-cultural, ethical, philosophical, and political issues that affect students, families, educators, schools, and communities. Example topics of study include social inequality, immigration, standards and accountability, race/ethnicity, school choice, and international comparisons. An integrated field experience enables students to analyze and interpret how some of the topics under study play out in our local community.

EDU211- Education and Society

Katherine Baker, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Politics

The field of education is ripe with potential and fraught with controversy. This interdisciplinary course examines a variety of historical, socio-cultural, ethical, philosophical, and political issues that affect students, families, educators, schools, and communities. Example topics of study include social inequality, immigration, standards and accountability, race/ethnicity, school choice, and international comparisons. An integrated field experience enables students to analyze and interpret how some of the topics under study play out in our local community.

EDU467- Early Childhood Policy/Advocacy

Heidi Hollingsworth, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health; Politics

This course focuses on connecting the science of early childhood development with the real world applications of program design and implementation. It includes an analysis of how federal, state, and local policies impact early childhood programs. Finally, this course acquaints students with the advocacy process as a means to influence policy decisions based on the science of early development.

ENG250- Interpretations of Literature

Stephanie Needham, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course employs different critical approaches to interpret and evaluate poetry, drama and fiction from a variety of cultures.

ENG255- Stephen King

Daniel Burns, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Steadily maintaining his prolific status as a major global publishing phenomenon for nearly a half century, best-selling writer Stephen King continues to exert a powerful cultural influence over contemporary popular media across a variety of categories and platforms. Whether anticipating the millennial market dominance of teen paranormal romance and post-apocalyptic subgenres or directly inspiring this decade’s nostalgia for 80s SF/horror/true crime in binge-worthy television series such as Stranger Things and American Horror Story,
King’s most prominent subject, “coming of age,” remains as relevant as ever for current audiences. Accordingly, this three-week course reads the modern master of horror as “YA fiction for adults” in selections organized by three key themes in his work: childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. In short papers, quizzes, and interactive presentations, students will analyze and evaluate King’s imaginative impact on postwar American literature and culture via a survey of stories, essays, novellas, novels, and TV/film adaptations.

ENG255- Wilderness and Spiritual Reckoning

George Hlavaty, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course will interrogate concepts such as nature, wilderness, and spirituality with a primary focus on the American experience of landscape. Readings will include religious texts of varied traditions as well as
secular works by authors such as Leslie Marmon Silko, James Dickey, Barry Lopez, and others. Class sessions will include experiential instruction in basic outdoor skills, nature awareness, and meditation.

ENG255- A Brief History of Truth

Ross Howell, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Everybody knows what the truth is, right? Maybe not, in the age of “fake news” and “alternative facts.” Turns out, Western civilization has been arguing about the truth since the time of Plato and Aristotle. In “A Brief History of Truth,” we’ll explore our understanding of truth by reading, discussing, and writing about philosophy, literature, film, and argument from the time of the ancient Greeks until today.

ENG255- Fairy Tales in Literature and Film

Margaret Chapman, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Theme: Media

“Once upon a time” is a special sort of invocation, enticing us into a magical world full of talking animals, wicked stepmothers, and princes and princesses brought low. But where do these stories come from and why have they remained popular for so long? We’ll look at the literary origins of some famous fairy tales from across cultures, and examine how artists, writers, and filmmakers have used these “old” tales to tell new stories. Readings will include classic works by the Grimm Brothers, Andersen, and Afanasyev, and fiction by Angela Carter, Aimee Bender, Neil Gaiman, and more. We’ll watch Disney and non-Disney adaptations and look at the scholarship of the literary fairy tale which will help us analyze how these stories shape the way we think about gender, class, race, nationality, and the environment.

ENG255- The Killer in Literature

Patricia Leaf-Prince, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

In this course, we will wrestle with weighty moral questions as we examine the complex motivations and portrayals of killers in literary (fiction and nonfiction), journalistic, news/magazine, dramatic, and cinematic texts. Why do people kill one another? How are murderers vilified, excused, and even mythologized, in the public and judicial spheres? Why, in some cases, is the defendant constructed as the victim and the victim as the criminal? What do such judgments reflect about class, race, and gender in American society? As we strive to
answer these questions, we will deepen our understanding and analysis of genres and texts.

ENG255- The AIDS Play

Scott Proudfit, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Theme: Media

The first major plays to deal with AIDS premiered in New York City in 1985: William Hoffman’s As Is
and Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart. For the next decade, “the AIDS play” dominated U.S. theatre.
However, was the AIDS play truly a genre? Do plays such as Beirut, Angels in America, and Jeffrey have
enough in common that they should be considered a cohesive group? This course will examine the genre of the AIDS play within the context of AIDS-themed art, performance, and protest in NYC in the 1980s and ’90s. In
addition to the plays mentioned, we will read Zero Positive, Safe Sex, Prelude to a Kiss, Eastern Standard, Marvin’s Room, Love! Valour! Compassion!, and Lonely Planet, among others. We will also spend some time on “the AIDS musical”: Falsettoland, Rent, The Book of Mormon, and others. This course fulfills the General Studies requirement for Expression and counts as a literature course.

ENG255- Mad Men and Bad Men

Zachary Laminack, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Theme: Media

What’s the difference between Don Draper and Walter White, or between Pete Campbell and Jessie Pinkman? What can the runaway popularity of Mad Men and Breaking Bad, and the different men at the center of each narrative, show us about American cultural attitudes toward masculinity from the mid-2010s? Putting Mad Men and Breaking Bad into conversation with American literature from the mid-20th century to the first decades of the 21st, we will work to unpack representations of American masculinities as they respond to shifts in American cultural history. Through our work with these and other texts, we’ll develop critical approaches for reading and theorizing gender and sexuality. In particular, we’ll focus on how fiction and television, as archives of the American cultural imagination, represent masculinity as a tense negotiation between power and powerlessness.

ENG255- The Marriage Plot

Gregory Brennen, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Theme: Media

“There is no happiness in love, except at the end of an English novel,” Victorian novelist Anthony Trollope once quipped. From the famous novels of Jane Austen to Fifty Shades of Grey, readers and viewers have been obsessed with the marriage plot: that classic narrative in which couples overcome obstacles in order finally to marry. Marriage plots are very much alive today, not just in fiction but in rom-coms and bingeable TV series like
Downtown Abbey. This course investigates the long history of the marriage plot and its many challengers. We’ll come to grips with the marriage plot in its classic form before exploring some of the many alternatives: divorce plots, remarriage plots, courtships that fizzle out or go on forever, queer romances, or narratives that reject marriage entirely. What gives the marriage plot such power to enthrall readers and viewers, even in the age of hookup culture and online dating, while millennials delay marriage and their parents get divorced? Is marriage still, as it was for the narrator of Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice, a universal goal? How and why has the cultural imagination of marriage changed from Austen’s day to ours? Are we ready to think beyond or without marriage
plots? This course will explore such questions by reading, writing about, and thinking with a handful of novels, including a classic Jane Austen novel and Jeffrey Eugenides’s contemporary The Marriage Plot, alongside shorter selections from a variety of media and genres.

ENG255- The American Slave Narrative

Crystal Smith, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Theme: Media

The slave narrative documents the journey from slavery to freedom. We will read and synthesize texts that explore the slave narrative as abolitionist literature, biography, and with high cultural stakes, a force for social change. In these works of literature, the fugitive or former slave is given a first-ever public voice to state their new independence and capture the historic truth of their accounts. We will hold close readings of the most notable writers of the genre: Fredrick Douglas, Booker T. Washington, Harriet Jacobs, and read, in its entirety, Elizabeth Keckley’s Behind the Scenes: Or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House. Following this historic overview, we will examine the neo-slave narrative, a sub-genre of authors who write novel-based works that rediscover the slave narrative through modern-day lens. Of such works, we will examine portions of the Pulitzer-Prize winning, Beloved by Toni Morrison. In the final portion of the course, we will examine the modern-day cinematic representation of the slave narrative and the transference of Solomon Northup’s 12 Years A Slave into the film adaptation directed by Steve McQueen. Prepare to think critically, write reflectively, and engage in scholarly discussions and critiques.

ENG255- Crime Fiction and Film

Craig Morehead, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

The seedy criminal underworld has long been a popular subject for literature and film. This course focuses on how crime narratives reflect and shape cultural anxieties about outsiders, class and racial divisions, urban dangers, the possibility of justice, and the nature of good and evil. We will examine how representations of crime and criminality in British and American novels, poems, short stories, and films engage with
issues of justice, identity, and criminal psychology. Using a comparative approach, we will analyze the influence of time and place to track movements, genres, and effects in the development of British and American crime narratives from the late 1800’s to present day. The course grade is mostly comprised of reading quizzes, short critical response papers, class discussion, and a final exam.

ENG312- Visual Rhetorics

Li Li, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course introduces students to the specialized study and practice of visual rhetoric and document design. Emphasizing the rhetorical nature of visuals and design, the course draws attention to the thinking, processes and skills that are part of design, with specific attention to the design of various documents professional writers encounter. Students will be introduced to a variety of theories and design approaches. In addition to studying this content, they will have opportunities to apply and reflect on what they have learned.

ENG346- Major Authors: George Orwell

Rosemary Haskell, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media; Politics

Life shapes the art of this mid-twentieth century author, whose career we will trace through the history of imperialist yet depression-ridden and war-torn Britain. Works addressed include Down and Out in Paris and London, Animal Farm, Nineteen-Eighty-Four, and selected essays and journalism.

ENG375- Alternate Languages

Kathy Lyday, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

Spoken and written languages are common and fairly easy to study, but the more uncommon and unusual forms of communication are the main topics in this course. While we will look briefly at the important aspects of sound, writing, and grammar of languages, this course will take students into the worlds of pictographic and glyphic languages, non-verbal communication, sign languages, cryptology and secret codes, Morse Code, Braille, the inner-workings of “made-up” languages like Esperanto, Klingon, and Navi, as well as other more obscure ways that people and animals communicate. Students will have the opportunity to try their hand at “reading” and creating languages of their own through group work and in-class activities. This course fulfills the Language credit in the English Major and counts towards Advanced General Studies credit.

ENS104- Issues in Animal Conservation

Amanda Chunco, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health; Politics

Across the globe, wildlife populations are being lost at an alarming rate. Climate change, habitat loss, and emerging diseases are just a few threats faced by wildlife. Thus, wildlife ecologists and managers face an enormous challenge and an important responsibility to understand wild populations as a first step in projecting them. In addition, conservation action requires not just an understanding of basic biology, but also recognition of human need, political will, economic constraints, and the complicated laws that govern wild resources. In this class, we will focus on the basic biology, distribution, and interaction between wild populations within the framework of real-world conservation issues. We will apply basic ecological principles to studying wild populations at multiple levels: 1) the individuals, 2) the population, and 3) the community. Wildlife ecology has traditionally encompassed amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, and we will primarily focus on these group.

ENS172- Climate Change- Communication

Thomas Hoban, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media, Health, Politics

Climate change represents the most serious long-term threat to the environment and society that humans have ever faced. Fortunately, scientists and governments have identified a range of policies and behaviors that could help us mitigate and adapt to climate change. However, the current situation is limited by the fact that many people – particularly elected officials – continue to deny that climate change is a serious problem. Innovative and proactive communication will be necessary to change the beliefs and attitudes that limit willingness and ability to act on climate change. During this class, students will review the social science research on climate change attitude and behavior. From this research review, student teams will develop strategic communication plans and programs to help motivate action to address climate change. No credit toward the environmental studies major or minor. Does not satisfy the Core Curriculum Science requirement. Counts toward Society requirement in Core Curriculum.

ENS174- Food Production and Culture in America: Past, Present, and Future

Gerald Dorsett, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health; Politics; Intercultural Engagement

This course will examine how food is grown, shown, processed, prepared, marketed, consumed and even how it relates to climate change and the GMO choices of tomorrow. Students will learn about food choices and how they are impacted by culture, personal perception, politics and economic status. Food in the Colonial Era will be examined on two different days, in one of North Carolina’s oldest continually operating settlements and at a Revolutionary era grain mill. Another focus will be the livestock industry and how it has been impacted by
the public’s changing perception of acceptable farming practices. The culmination of these experiences will help the student better understand the food system in America. This course will use a dynamic mix of invited speakers and frequent field trips. These excursions will relate to the culture around food, its production and the choices we make on how it is prepared and what we consume. The large number of field trips means some days will be extended, while others will be shortened, or cancelled to ensure students receive the appropriate hours for winter term course credit. Anyone who registers for this course will need to have a flexible schedule to allow for participation in all of the activities, even those that run past 12:00 noon. This course counts toward the Society requirement in the Core Curriculum. This course cannot be used to satisfy a Science requirement.

ESS374- Exercise Science and Aging

Simon Higgins, Monday-Friday 8:00-11:00am

Winter Term Themes: Health

Exercise Science and Aging examines the positive impact of habitual movement inclusive of exercise, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors on major biological aging processes. It aims to provide a basis for safe and effective movement prescription and programming throughout the lifespan to ultimately enhance health, broadly defined, and quality of life.

GEO375- Middle East: People and Place

David Marshall, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Politics

This course introduces students to the environmental, cultural, economic and geopolitical factors that have given the Middle East (Southwest Asia and North Africa) its distinct geographic sense of place. The overall aim of this course is to enable students to participate in debates about contemporary geopolitical issues that are currently (re)shaping the region. Using an inquiry-based learning approach, students will engage topics including the role of religion in the region, the legacy of colonialism, the relationship between petro-politics and authoritarianism, the causes and consequences of the Arab Spring, the historical roots and future direction of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, as well as the human and environmental factors driving or exacerbating conflict and migration. Through the lens of critical geopolitics, this course will examine these issues through a variety of scales and perspectives, from global-scale patterns and processes to national politics, urban spaces and embodied experiences.

GER121- Introduction to German Language and Culture I

Kristin Lange, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

German courses at the 100 level introduce students to German culture as a way of achieving basic proficiency in German, both listening/speaking and reading/writing. Topics of cultural study may include: stereotypes about the Germans; daily life, leisure, and travel; shopping and commerce; likes and dislikes; geography and cities; housing and modes of living. The course consistently connects German study to students’ academic and career goals.

HSS111- The Art and Science of Human Services Studies (Service Learning Course)

Beth Warner, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Health

This course explores the history, values and ethics of the human services profession. Students are introduced to the theoretical approaches to human services work, issues of social justice and the evidence used to guide interventions and policy designed to address human problems.

HSS270- What the Healthcare?

Monica Burney, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Health; Politics; Intercultural Engagement

Why can’t everyone have free healthcare? What are Medicad/Medicare and why is the government always fighting about it? Is Obamacare really going to help? What will happen if I need to go to the hospital? What the Healthcare? is a play on the What the Health? film raising awareness of systemic issues impacting food consumption. In the What the Healthcare? course we will explore real issues in navigating American healthcare through personal and political lenses. We will also use film/TV to discuss those influences and media/pop culture’s impact on the way Americans consume healthcare. There will be opportunity to visit local healthcare settings and speak with professionals about issues discussed in class. Topics covered will be clustered and include: end of life, emergency care, caregiving, disability/chronic disease, crisis/trauma, substance abuse, resource/referral, and medical/legal issues.

HSS330- Fatherhood

Judith Esposito, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

This course focuses on the many issues, societal expectations, joys and challenges that accompany fatherhood. Particular emphasis will be on the dynamics of the relationships between fathers and their children, how these dynamics change over the lifespan, and how relationships with fathers influence future generations. The course will also explore the societal perceptions of fatherhood across cultures, of special populations (i.e. teen fathers, stay-at-home dads), and how these perceptions have changed throughout history.

HSS379- Eating Disorders: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention

Eleanor Herman, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health; Intercultural Engagement

This course offers students a comprehensive understanding of the etiology, cultural issues, and the evolution of treatment efforts of Eating Disorders ranging from Anorexia Nervosa to Binge Eating Disorder. The student will learn about levels of treatment, problem solve with case studies and guest speakers, and understand the pervasiveness of this issue in our society. Students will apply their learning to an awareness project on Elon’s campus.

HSS381- Practicum: Theory and Practice of Human Service Studies

Christina Horsford, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health

Three weeks of direct practice and observation in a human services organization provide the opportunity for students to apply and conceptualize various aspects of human service delivery using this approach. Student learning will be guided and enhanced through weekly seminars, written assignments and faculty site visits.

HSS381- Practicum: Theory and Practice of Human Service Studies

Philip Miller, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health

Three weeks of direct practice and observation in a human services organization provide the opportunity for students to apply and conceptualize various aspects of human service delivery using this approach. Student learning will be guided and enhanced through weekly seminars, written assignments and faculty site visits.

HST241- U.S. History Study Tour

Jim Bissett, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Politics

Through readings, discussions and visits to historic sites, students will learn about major turning points, issues and actors in U.S. history. Students will grapple with the contested nature of historical interpretation and identify some of the “driving forces” that have caused and influenced Americans’ experiences.

HST242- Culture of the American South

John Beck, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Politics

This course examines the origins and evolution of the culture of the American South by focusing on five key patterns that have shaped it: agrarianism; a unique class system; a set of racial assumptions, relationships and values arising out of slavery and later segregation; a particular pattern of marriage, family and gender; and a unique shared religion based on the principles and practices of evangelical Protestant Christianity. The variations of this culture—the subcultures within it—and the tension between Southern culture and the broader national culture will also be important areas of study.

HST353- Colonial Latin America

Shayna Mehas, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

This course will survey the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times through the wars for independence at the beginning of the 19th century. The course seeks to explain the development of a multicultural, multiethnic and multilingual society in Latin America by studying the cultures of pre-Columbian and Iberian societies, the complexities of the interaction between these different cultures as they “met in the Americas” and the historical processes through which new cultures evolved. Some of the major topics that will be discussed include Amerindian culture, the encounter between Europeans and Amerindians (otherwise known as the Conquest), the rise and fall of colonial empires and colonial society, and the civil wars of independence.

IDS202- Culture, History, and Art of Iraq

Ahmed Al Fadaam, Monday-Thursday 1:30-4:39pm

Winter Term Themes: Media; Intercultural Engagement; Politics

During the last decade, the United States was involved in war with Iraq. Many Americans and especially the young know very little about this country and why the government decided to send the troops there. Most of what they know comes from the media, just bits and pieces here and there about what really happened in that country. But after the war was over and the troops came home, in order to have a future understanding of what happened and why, we need to know more about that country, about the other side’s ways of thinking and believing. By showing the history, culture, and mentality of Iraqis, this course will help students in a “neutral way” to know more about Iraq and the war that took place in that part of the world.

IDS224- Disarming Injustice: Nonviolence and the Civil Rights Movement

Faith James, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Politics

In this course, we will examine how civil rights leaders and activists used the theories and tactics of nonviolence to challenge the institutions of segregation in the American South. The course will culminate in travel to sites important to the movement in Atlanta, Montgomery, Birmingham, and Selma.

IDS271- Mirabile Visu!: Rome Through Text and Television

Daniel Schindler, Monday-Friday 1:30-2:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media; Intercultural Engagement

How can we recreate the past? Do the choices we make matter? What do our visions of the past say about our present moment? In this course, students will investigate these questions and more with regard to the ancient Roman world. We will take as our starting point the HBO series ROME, which follows (and dramatizes) the lives of characters both historical and fictional through the city’s transition from the late Republic to the Principate during the lives of Caesar and then Augustus. The series will be a springboard for student research into the world of ancient Rome and its intriguing inhabitants; much of our time will be spent learning how to work with primary sources and scholarship in the discipline of Classics. Our topics of exploration will include history, cultural life, architecture, sex, gender, oratory, philosophy, slavery, military life, ethics, ethnicity, literature, and other areas of interest. Counts toward Civilization or Expression requirement. Counts toward the Classical Studies minor.

ITL121- Elementary Italian I

Adriana Cerami, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

This course is designed for students with little or no prior experience in the language. Special emphasis is placed on active communication to develop oral and comprehension skills. Students will learn to converse and write about daily routines, likes and dislikes in the present, and commence usage of past tenses. Factual information about the nature of daily life and routines in Italian culture will also be acquired.

JST 270 Vulnerable Writing: The Jewish Cuban Experience of Trauma and Exile

J. Lang Hilgartner, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media; Politics

This course invites students to listen to the voices of Jewish Cuban exiles who have chosen to explore their imaginations, memories, and psyches in diverse literary genres, including essays, memoire, poetry, opera, and musical theatre. For these Jewish Cuban writers, the path of discovery of their identity lies in unlocking their tenuous and conflictive connection to an Island that continues to haunt and intrigue them to this day. Their works are mosaics of emotional nuance and historical and socio-political complexity that reveal the multicultural hybridity inherent to both Jewish and Cuban cultures.

LAT170/270/370- Meet the Romans

Kristina Meinking, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

Who were the Romans? What did they eat, think, believe? Did they feel emotions like ours, care about city planning, or worry about the environment? To answer these questions and many more, students in this mixed level Latin course will work with the professor to develop a personalized syllabus based on their own goals and intellectual interests. Our time in class will be spent working together and in peer cohorts on tasks and projects that help deepen our learning about the language and culture of the ancient Romans. No pre-requisites.

MUS316- Classic and Romantic Music

Thomas Erdmann, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media; Politics; Intercultural Engagement

By reading, listening, research and writing, students explore the relationship of 18th- and 19th-century music to the world, as the expression of artists responding to political, social and philosophical environments. The course also emphasizes the progressive study of formal analysis, from smaller forms to the large single and multi-movement genres of the period.

MUS319-History of American Music

Marshall Harwood, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media; Intercultural Engagement

Study of American music from 1620 to the present focuses on elements of various musical cultures (e.g., Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America) that have influenced the American style of music.

MUS343- African-American Composers

Billy Summers, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media; Intercultural Engagement

This course looks at the lives of African-American composers, their music and the social structure within which they lived. The course allows students to investigate the artistic impact of American historical events and trends such as Jim Crow laws, segregation and cabaret cards.

PHL- Dissent and Resistance

Nim Batchelor, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Politics; Media

Under what conditions is political resistance justified? What moral and legal rights and duties are involved? Is non-violence always required or is militant resistance sometimes warranted? What is required for a government’s laws and actions to be “legitimate” and what are the “tipping points” that justify active resistance? How do the notions of equality, the rule of law, and democracy fact or into such judgments? We will study examples of non-violent civil disobedience movements (Ghandi, King, etc), but we will also study cases where
militant resistance, secession or even revolution were justified. We will examine boycotts, whistleblowing, leaking, jury nullification, vigilantism, and wide array of other forms of political action. Discussions with experienced activists will enable students in this class to explore a series of personal questions. For example, given that positive social change can often take decades, what are reasonable
expectations? On the other hand, has the emergence of social media shifted the pace of social change so that we can expect more and sooner? How do activists cope with despair and for what must one always sustain hope? How does one develop the “courage of your convictions?” Students will also have the opportunity to experience non-violent protest training. Overall, this course seeks to help students understand and justify their personal stance on all of these pressing contemporary issues.

PHL375- Films of Woody Allen

Yoram Lubling, 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media; Intercultural Engagement

This course introduces students to philosophical issues raised by the phenomena of films and examines the uniqueness of films as an art form. Looking at the work of Woody Allen, members of the course will unpack both in his intentions and issues raised by his films, ranging from the nature of love, intimacy, artistic creativity, psychoanalysis and personal identity to the fear and denial of death, war, revolution, narcissism, intellectualism, communal relations, racism, religion and the existence of God, among others. Counts toward Jewish Studies minor.

PHL378- Roman Philosophies

Ryan Johnson, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

This class focuses on three schools of Roman philosophies: Epicureanism, Stoicism, and Skepticism. In addition to learning the theories and belief systems of these schools, this class will also ask students to quite literally become Epicureans, Stoics, and Skeptics in their daily lives. This is a class on philosophy conceived as a way of life, and we will bring back to life these ancient forms of living.

POL116- Local Government Simulation

Jessica Carew, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Politics

This course examines the structure and functioning of local governments and applies that understanding in a simulation of local government issues in which students assume the roles of city council members, planning commission members, organizational leaders, business owners, citizen groups and the media.

POL372- Politics of Radicalism

Joshua Miller, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Politics; Media

This course examines major radical political movements from the early 20th century to the present, including Marxism, fascism, feminism, and post-colonialism. Combining close readings of primary source documents with studies of influential films, the course also explores broader themes related to
power, class, gender, and culture.

POL373- Women of American Politics

Kaye Ursy, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30

Winter Term Themes: Politics

This course is explores the role of gender in contemporary American politics. The topics covered include: the history of the women’s movement and feminist ideals in the United States, the gender gap in mass political behavior, the challenges and obstacles faced by women when campaigning for office, and the activities of women when they do achieve elected office. Students will also become familiar with contemporary political debates about so-called “women’s” issues, including family leave, affordable child care, and reproductive health.

POL374- Southern Politics

Jason Husser, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Politics

Southern Politics provides an overview of politics in the 11 former Confederate states, primarily since 1950. Students examine cultural, institutional, and partisan differences within the South and between the South and other regions of the United States. The course covers both broad contextual phenomena shaping the region as well as distinctive personalities and events.

PSY218- Psychology of the Internet

Amy Hogan, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Politics; Media

This course provides a comprehensive look into the current understanding of Internet psychology. What do we know about how people behave in cyberspace? Since the inception of the Internet, society has witnessed how the Internet can be harnessed by those with darker motives (e.g., terrorists, sexual predators, hackers), but has also seen a blossoming of online romances, the formation of deep friendships and the harnessing of the Internet for positive social change. This course will examine how the Internet environment changes the way we think, behave and take responsibility. Topics covered will include identity, virtual communities, privacy, liberty and trust in Cyberspace, romantic relationships, social support groups, conflict, e-business, globalization, and the digital divide.

PSY225- Mental Illness and Film

CJ Fleming, 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health; Media

Hollywood depictions of mental illness have contributed significantly to the ideas and images many individuals hold about mental illness. Students will look at some of the major types of mental illnesses (e.g., depression, sexual disorders, schizophrenia, antisocial personality disorder) and examine how they have been portrayed, for better and worse, in popular films.

PSY245- Early Childhood Development

Sabrina Thurman, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health; Politics; Intercultural Engagement; Media

Recent research has led to a new appreciation of the importance of early life experiences on child development. This course examines the power of the inseparable and highly interactive influences of genetics and environment on the complex emotions, cognitive abilities and essential social skills that develop during the early years of life. The implications of this new understanding of early childhood for families, communities, policy makers and service providers who strive to increase the odds of favorable development are explored.

PSY315- Psychology of Sex and Gender

Rachel Force, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Health; Politics; Media

This course focuses on the psychology of sex and gender from a feminist perspective and is organized around four themes: gender as a social construction, the importance of language and the power to name, class and cultural diversity, and knowledge as a source of social change.

PSY363- Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Erika Lopina, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Health

Psychological applications in the workplace are the focus of this course. Topics include personnel selection, leadership and motivation, job satisfaction, and work performance.

PSY366- Psychology in Cultural Context

Buffie Longmire-Avital, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Health

Issues in the related fields of cultural and cross-cultural psychology are considered in depth as students investigate basic psychological processes (e.g., motivation, cognition and emotion) in the context of how cultural world views and implicit value assumptions influence the development and functioning of human behavior and social interaction.

REL271- Texts of Terror

Amanda Bledsoe, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media; Intercultural Engagement

This course examines the intersections between religion and violence, through an investigation into narratives of violence and marginalization in the Hebrew Bible and Christian New Testament. Drawing on the phrase “Texts of Terror,” introduced by feminist biblical scholar Phyllis Trible, this course will confront stories of rape, torture, murder, and genocide in religious texts by applying a range of hermeneutical approaches.

REL275- Muslims in America

Ariela Marcus-Sells, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Politics; Intercultural Engagement

This course will explore the history of Muslims in the United States from the era of the slave trade and to the present day. We will examine the political and cultural roles and contributions of Muslim Americans and immigrants and trace the interplay of national, racial, and religious identities at the heart of Muslim life in this country.

SOC131- Sociology Through Film

Robin Gary, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media

This course explores sociological principles, concepts, theories, ideas, themes and issues as they may be illustrated in cinema, television and commercials. Relevant sociological readings are assigned to accompany the specific sociological content being illustrated in each session. Themes for each section will vary and be determined by each professor.

SOC131- Sociology Through Film

Alexis Franzese, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media

This course explores sociological principles, concepts, theories, ideas, themes and issues as they may be illustrated in cinema, television and commercials. Relevant sociological readings are assigned to accompany the specific sociological content being illustrated in each session. Themes for each section will vary and be determined by each professor.

SOC131- Sociology Through Film

Thomas Arcaro, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Theme: Intercultural Engagement; Media

This course explores sociological principles, concepts, theories, ideas, themes and issues as they may be illustrated in cinema, television and commercials. Relevant sociological readings are assigned to accompany the specific sociological content being illustrated in each session. Themes for each section will vary and be determined by each professor.

SPN122- Elementary Spanish II

Jill Auditori, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement

This course continues development of skills in basic structures within increasing cultural and literary competence. Special emphasis continues to be placed on development of oral and comprehension skills. Students will learn to discuss topics of a personal nature in present, past and future, and to express opinions on a limited range of topics. Knowledge of Hispanic history and cultures is also extended.

SPN340- Limitless Language: Spanish Dialects

Elena Schoonmaker-Gates, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Intercultural Engagement; Media

This course allows students to explore the wide world of Spanish dialectology, cultivating a greater awareness and understanding of the linguistic variation that occurs in the Spanish language. Class activities encourage students to draw on their existing knowledge and examine their beliefs about dialect in both Spanish and English, honing their observation skills by experiencing music, film, and other mediums through the lens of regional variation. Additional benefits of learning about dialects include improved comprehension and communication in real-world contexts for nonnative speakers. Taught in Spanish.

SPT261- Professional Sports Management

Shaina Dabbs, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

Professional sport is big business, and this course provides an overview of professional sport management issues. Topics covered include marketing, sponsorship and sales, media, facility and personnel management, and legal and liability issues.

THE125- Acting for Non-Majors

Carroll Johnson, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course is designed to meet the interests of the non-major. With this course’s dual focus, students gain experience in acting and examine topics such as the art of acting, leading to a more informed audience respondent.

THE125- Acting for Non-Majors

Mitchel Sommers, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Media

This course is designed to meet the interests of the non-major. With this course’s dual focus, students gain experience in acting and examine topics such as the art of acting, leading to a more informed audience respondent.

THE251- Costume Construction

Karl Green, Monday-Friday 8:30-11:30am

Winter Term Themes: Media

Students will explore the process and techniques involved in costume construction through theoretical and realized construction projects. They will develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, while enriching their understanding of the equipment and materials used in the construction of theatrical costumes.

THE370- Revolution! Coming to a Stage Near You

Marshall Botvinick, Monday-Friday 1:30-4:30pm

Winter Term Themes: Politics; Media

This course looks at the relationship between theatre and political/cultural revolutions. It investigates three key questions: 1. How can theatre shape our understanding of revolution? 2. How can theatre contextualize and mythologize the events of specific revolutions and the people involved in them? 3. How can theatre ignite or participate in revolutionary activity? The course will focus on five revolutions: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Sexual Revolution, the Romanian Revolution of 1989, and the Arab Spring. With each of these revolutions, students will engage with at least one play/musical that directly connects with these events. In addition, students will learn basic political science concepts about what constitutes a revolution as well as study a selection of texts about the role played by artists during a revolution.