On Campus Courses

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ANT 329Gender Inequality Across Cltr This course focuses on women's issues from an anthropological perspective, emphasizing evolutionary and cross-cultural considerations, and including the impact of globalization on women's lives. Gender relations and women's status/roles are discussed in the context of the following systems: economic, political, kinship and family, religion and healing. Topics include women's life-cycles, the cultural construction of gender, personhood and violence against women. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or ANT 112.
ANT 380The Ancient Maya The class will address specifically the culture or civilization of the ancient Maya through archaeological remains, art, architecture, and ethno-historic documentation. Students will be introduced to the origins of Maya civilization through the peak of Maya civilization, along with the collapse and colonial contact with the Maya. Along with the chronological perspective of these developments, an additional thematic approach will also be taken to the course. A few important themes to be addressed in the course include ancient Maya politics, economics, social organization, religion, art, architecture, technology, and material culture.
ANT 382Anthropology of Babies

What do babies have to teach us about being human? In this winter term course, students will explore pregnancy, birth, and infancy in evolutionary and cross-cultural contexts. Students will learn how assisted birth evolved in humans in parallel with examination of the diversification of the rituals, beliefs, and symbols associated with pregnancy, birth, and infant care cross-culturally.  They will examine stages of infant development and the ways parenting practices shape health and development. Through exploration of ethnographies, films, guest lectures, field trips, and a variety of active learning exercises in the classroom, students will engage some of the key controversies surrounding contemporary pregnancy, birth, feeding, and infant care practices. Students will complete a diverse series of writing assignments, field reports, and a final research paper.

ANT 385Culture and Business

The course is an in-depth, hands on exploration of the interplay between elements of culture, social institutions and business settings.  The professor will guide students through an understanding of the concepts of culture and social institutions. Students will be required to investigate, through research as well as through reflection, how the culture and social institutions of a particular country or world region of their choosing is essential to various aspects of business such as product development, marketing, and preparation for an international business trip and/or meeting.

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BUS 375Cuture and Business The course is an in-depth, hands on exploration of the interplay between elements of culture, social institutions and business settings. The professor will guide students through an understanding of the concepts of culture and social institutions. Students will be required to investigate, through research as well as through reflection, how the culture and social institutions of a particular country or world region of their choosing is essential to various aspects of business such as product development, marketing, and preparation for an international business trip and/or meeting.
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COM 266The Fellows Experience This course provides students a domestic travel experience that offers an inside look at media and communications industries. Prerequisite: Communications Fellows only, application required.
COR 311Globalization of Hip Hop This course will examine the power of language as a voice for communities and a force for change. Through both popular and academic texts we will look at, first, the origins and spread of hip-hop music in the United States, giving voice to an underrepresented community. We will critically examine concepts such as representation, appropriation, genre, and authenticity in order to understand how hip-hop originated as a music form and became a highly developed youth culture both in the United States and across the globe. This course will incorporate concepts from economics, art history, cultural studies, education, and linguistics, as well as a variety of multimedia to explore, challenge, and explain the global spread of hip-hop music. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study.
COR 323Gobally Networked Age In this course, we will explore the changing nature of work from a socio-historical perspective in which particular emphasis will be placed on current trends and the resulting societal implications in our global age of an increasingly globally networked economy. In the process, we will look at how work has been created, organized, performed, valued and compensated at different points in history. The course will also include exploration into credentialing and hiring practices related to issues of education, skills, experience, gender, race, class, etc. The overarching goal of the course will be for students to have a better understanding of work and the implications of current work-related trends within the larger socio-historical context. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study.
COR 324Substance Abuse and Human Behavior This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of factors influencing alcohol and other drug use including facets of personality, culture and genetics. Students examine issues from a public health model and investigate prevention strategies based on lifestyle choices and harm reduction. Local, national and international issues are explored through presentations, class discussions, field trips and a research paper on alcohol and other drug issues in a country other than the United States. This course is writing intensive. Open to students in the third or fourth year of study. Counts toward Public Health Studies for students not using it as the Core Capstone.
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DAN 341Dance in Worship This course is an exploration of the role of dance in worship in a variety of cultures from primitive ancient rituals through 21st-century contemporary worship. Although a lecture course, students will at times be active participants in various forms of sacred dance. Students will also learn of the history and theory of dance as a form of worship. This course is for dancers and non-dancers.
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EDU 467Early Child Research Pol Prac This course focuses on connecting the science of early childhood development with the real world applications of program design and implementation. It includes an analysis of how federal, state, and local policies impact early childhood programs. Finally, this course acquaints students with advocacy process as a means to influence policy decisions based on the science of early development. Offered winter.
ENG 346Tennessee Williams Each course taught under this number studies the life and representative works of a major author. The course will address the author's cultural and intellectual influences, critical receptions, and relationships to literary periods, movements, and genres. Refer to the Schedule Information document for the term posted OnTrack for the author to be studied.
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HSS 326Special Populations in Hum Sr This course explores specific populations of human services clients such as persons with disabilities, children at risk, persons with HIV/AIDS, persons with terminal illnesses, etc. Needs of the particular populations under study are explored as well as programs, services and innovations in service provision. Specific populations studied vary based on current trends and issues in the field.
HST 242Culture of the American South This course examines the origins and evolution of the culture of the American South by focusing on five key patterns that have shaped it: agrarianism; a unique class system; a set of racial assumptions, relationships and values arising out of slavery and later segregation; a particular pattern of marriage, family and gender; and a unique shared religion based on the principles and practices of evangelical Protestant Christianity. The variations of this culture-the subcultures within it-and the tension between Southern culture and the broader national culture will also be important areas of study.
HST 363African-American History Beginning with the slave system in the mid-19th century, this course examines recurring issues and problems in African-American history through the post-Civil Rights era. Study focuses on three themes: the similarity and differences of African-American experiences; the extent to which they were oppressed yet also had choices; and their strategies to cope with their social and political situations.
HST 393LGBTQ History in the United States Students in this course will study the experiences of people in the United States sometimes called "homosexual," "lesbian," "gay," "trans," "queer," and other terms and how and why those experiences changed over time. Students will explore what factors affected their experiences, including policies, attitudes, community development, social movements, and changing notions of identity. While some attention will be paid to earlier periods, the course will focus primarily on events of the 20th century, and students will do a project related to post-1950 history. Students of any sexual orientation or gender are welcome in the course, and there are no course prerequisites; however, students should be willing to grapple with upper-level history assignments and be open to learning about people who may have been different from or similar to themselves. Counts toward Women's/Gender Studies minor.
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IDS 202Culture, History, and Art of Iraq During the last decade, the United States was involved in war with Iraq. Many Americans and especially the young know very little about this country and why the government decided to send the troops there. Most of what they know comes from the media, just bits and pieces here and there about what really happened in that country. But after the war was over and the troops came home, in order to have a future understanding of what happened and why, we need to know more about that country, about the other side's ways of thinking and believing. By showing the history, culture, and mentality of Iraqis, this course will help students in a neutral way" to know more about Iraq and the war that took place in that part of the world." Counts toward Civilization or Expression requirement. Counts toward Middle East Studies minor and International Studies major.
IDS 224Non-Violence and Civil Rights In this course, we will examine how civil rights leaders and activists used the theories and tactics of nonviolence to challenge the institutions of segregation in the American South. The course will culminate in travel to sites important to the movement in Atlanta, Montgomery, Birmingham, and Selma. Counts toward Civilization or Society requirement. Counts toward African and African-American Studies, American Studies, Leadership Studies, and Poverty and Social Justice Studies minors. Travel embedded course. Additional fees may apply.
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MUS 272Why Does the Fat Lady Sing? Students will study basic concepts of opera, including historical, musical, and biographical information. The course will proceed chronologically, discussing major opera composers and vocabulary that accompanies each time period. Each class period meets for three hours, Monday through Friday, and will have some component of critical thinking analysis (audio/video examples). Major opera plots and characters will also be discussed, and students will be encouraged to relate them to modern society and find their relevance.
MUS 274Woodstock, Hippies & Other Enduring Legacies: Music of the 60’s & 70’s The course will cover the major music groups in the '60s and '70s and the advent of the technological advance in recording. The student will gain an understanding as to why this music/technology influenced the groups of today. It will start with the Beatles and their influences and will end with the early Police and Donna Summer era. Groups covered will include Jimi Hendrix, James Brown, Bob Dylan, The Rolling stones, Led Zeppelin, Eric Clapton, Elton John, Pink Floyd, The Who, Fleetwood Mac and Aretha Franklin. Soul, R&B, folk, punk, disco and major songwriters will also be covered. In addition, important recording advances that made it possible for this music to be presented on LP records will be discussed. Woodstock, The Monterey International Pop Festival, Height Asbury the rise of Southern rock and their influence on popular music will be included.
MUS 319History of American Music Study of American music from 1620 to the present focuses on elements of various musical cultures (e.g., Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America) that have influenced the American style of music.
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PHL 371Philosophy Behind Bars Many philosophers throughout history have had a troubled relationship with the law. By calling into question our most deeply held assumptions and encouraging us to look unflinchingly at the parts of ourselves and our communities that many prefer to ignore, the pursuit of wisdom has proven dangerous for some of its most dedicated practitioners. In this class, we will examine the work of philosophers who have been labeled "criminals" by their societies. Our examinations of these texts will lead us to question the nature of legality, criminality, incarceration, and philosophy itself. Our primary texts will be works that have originated from "behind bars." They will be drawn from a range of historical and cultural contexts and will include authors such as Plato, Boethius, Martin Luther King, and Angela Davis, among others.
PSY 225Mental Illness and Film Hollywood depictions of mental illness have contributed significantly to the ideas and images many individuals hold about mental illness. Students will look at some of the major types of mental illnesses (e.g., depression, sexual disorders, schizophrenia, antisocial personality disorder) and examine how they have been portrayed, for better and worse, in popular films.
PSY 245Early Childhood Development Recent research has led to a new appreciation of the importance of early life experiences on child development. This course examines the power of the inseparable and highly interactive influences of genetics and environment on the complex emotions, cognitive abilities and essential social skills that develop during the early years of life. The implications of this new understanding of early childhood for families, communities, policy makers and service providers who strive to increase the odds of favorable development are explored.
PSY 324Stereotyping and Prejudice Through the lens of gender, racial, and sexual prejudice, this course will examine the basic psychological processes that underlie stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. Cultural, societal and media influences will be discussed as well. Prerequisite: PSY 111.
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SOC 131Sociology Through Film This course explores sociological principles, concepts, theories, ideas, themes and issues as they may be illustrated in cinema, television and commercials. Relevant sociological readings are assigned to accompany the specific sociological content being illustrated in each session. Themes for each section will vary and be determined by each professor. Offered winter.
SOC 371Protest! Legacy of the 1960s An examination of social movements, with emphasis on movements of the 1960s in the United States. This course makes extensive use of documentaries and original source documents, alongside academic analyses, to fully immerse course participants in the era. Specific movements addressed include struggles for civil rights, the women's liberation movement, and anti-war protests. These subjects form the backdrop for consideration of recent protest activity.
SOC 375Gender and Crime This course examines how gender shapes patterns with an emphasis on the U.S. context. The course adopts an intersectional approach that recognizes the importance of sexuality, social class, and race/ethnicity for understanding men's and women's experiences with crime and justice. Topics include sexual violence; street harassment; feminization of poverty and the gender gap; masculinities and crime; and gender, sexuality, and bias crime. The role of gender in criminological theory will be explored in depth.
SOC 385Culture and Business The course is an in-depth, hands on exploration of the interplay between elements of culture, social institutions and business settings. The professor will guide students through an understanding of the concepts of culture and social institutions. Students will be required to investigate, through research as well as through reflection, how the culture and social institutions of a particular country or world region of their choosing is essential to various aspects of business such as product development, marketing, and preparation for an international business trip and/or meeting.

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