Winter Term Diversity Events

Wednesday, January 4
wInterfaith Lunch Series: Islam
11:30am
Community Life Center, Elon Community Church
Register Here

Each Wednesday in Winter Term, we invite members of a faith community to share about what they believe during a community lunch. This Wednesday we will learn about Islam. Lunch is provided for students. Sponsored by Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Elon Community Church

Mondays & Thursdays during Winter Term, starting Thursday, January 5
Race Card Project Installation
9am-3pm
Isabella Cannon Center

The Race Card Project Installation is an art project that accompanies this years MLK Jr. Commemorative Keynote Address by Michele Norris. The Race Card Projectwas launched in 2010 to spur candid conversations about race using six-word stories. More about the Race Card Project at Elon can be found here. Sponsored by Cultural and Special Programs

Thursday, January 5
Human Library
11am-2pm
Belk Library, 2nd floor
Register Here

The Human Library Project started in Denmark in 2000 and occurs in 30+ countries. Designed to create understanding and dialogue across people, individuals volunteer as “Human Books.” Attendees “check out the book” which means they have one-on-one conversations with the Human Books and share experiences. Starter questions are provided, and Human Book volunteers represent diverse walks of life and identities across race, religion, family background, sexual orientation, gender, profession, hobbies, class, disability, skill set, and additional aspects of what it means to be human! Sponsored by Belk Library; Colonnades Neighborhood Association; Gender and LGBTQIA Center
If you are interested in being a “book” please contact Patrick Rudd (prudd@elon.edu) before Thanksgiving break 2016!

Thursday, January 5
Willy Wilkinson, "Creating a Trans Affirming Campus"
10-11:15am and 3-4:30pm
Moseley 215
Register here for the 10am workshop; Register here for the 3pm workshop

This workshop will explore the range of transgender identities and experience, and identify how to create a respectful campus environment. We will discuss health, educational, and legal issues that impact trans people, and identify best practices for systemically supporting trans students and colleagues. Areas of campus life that will be addressed include: family acceptance, health and well-being, respectful interactions, equal access to gender-specific settings, identification documents and student records management, confidentiality, residential accommodations, and leadership development. Interactive, solutions-oriented, and engaging, this workshop will provide opportunities for learning and problem solving at all knowledge levels. For faculty, staff, students, and administrators. Sponsored by Office of the Provost; Gender and LGBTQIA Center

Thursday, January 5
Willy Wilkinson, "Viewing Trans Experience Through a Mixed Heritage Lens"
6:00-7:30pm
LaRose Theatre
Register Here

Willy Wilkinson, MPH is an award-winning, mixed heritage, Asian American, transgender writer, public health consultant, cultural competency trainer, and spoken word performer. He is author of the Lambda Literary-award winning book "Born on the Edge of Race and Gender: A Voice for Cultural Competency," which explores the ambiguities and complexities of mixed, trans and disability experience within a cultural competency framework. Reading excerpts from his writing, Wilkinson will use these passages as a jumping off point for an engaging discussion about culturally competent approaches to social interactions, community membership, classification systems and services. Sponsored by Office of the Provost; Gender and LGBTQIA Center

Friday, January 6
The Race Card Project Open Mic
7:00-9:00pm
Irazu

This is an opportunity to share your Race Cards and expand upon your six-word story. More information about the Race Card Project at Elon can be found here. Sponsored by the Colonnades Neighborhood Association

Tuesday, January 10
Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Keynote Address: Michele Norris, "The Race Card Project: Eavesdropping on America's Conversation on Race"
6:00pm
McCrary Theatre

Award-winning correspondent and author Michele Norris established herself as a most-trusted voice in America while hosting NPR's flagship news program "All Things Considered." In 2010 she launched "The Race Card Project" to spur candid conversations about attitudes and beliefs toward race in America. Elon University will augment Norris' visit and presentation with a Race Card Project of its own - an installation built from our community's observations, experiences, laments and celebrations. Watch for it and join the conversation. Admission: $13 or Elon ID. Tickets available November 28. Coffee Klatch to follow in the Isabella Cannon Room. Sponsored by Office of the Provost; Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education

Wednesday, January 11
wInterfaith Lunch Series: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
11:30am
Community Life Center, Elon Community Church
Register Here

Each Wednesday in Winter Term, we invite members of a faith community to share about what they believe during a community lunch. This Wednesday we will learn about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (the Mormon tradition). Lunch is provided for students. Sponsored by Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Elon Community Church

Wednesday, January 11
Poverty Simulations
4:00-6:00pm
McKinnon Hall

Participants will have the opportunity to simulate 4 weeks in a household living near the poverty line.  The simulation is most effective at helping us understand the multiple challenges of living in poverty in the United States when combined with pre-simulation readings and an in-depth debriefing session. This is a great activity for groups. This session can accommodate 80 participants and 10 in staff roles (for students who have completed to PovSim in the past). Sponsored by Poverty and Social Justice Program; Kernodle Center for Service Learning and Community Engagement

Thursday, January 12
Diversity is our Destiny: The Future of the Modern Workpace
1:30-3:30pm
Moseley 215
Register Here

Successfully working with others with different cultural backgrounds and communication styles can be challenging. As the professional space becomes more diverse this important skill has become one of the most highly sought by employers across the globe. In this workshop attendees will gain a better understanding of intercultural competence (IC) and its importance in the modern workplace, explore their own intercultural literacy and experiences, and understand how to successfully articulate their IC skills to employers. Sponsored by Student Professional Development Center

Thursday, January 12
Community Reflection: Mini-Seminars
5:30-6:30pm, reception to immediately follow
Alamance

A university-wide series of mini-seminars where students sign up to read a piece of scholarly writing and then attend a 45-minute critical reflection session led by a faculty member. Each session will focus on a topic and short reading that the faculty member has chosen because it has been especially insightful or even transformative for students studying concepts around human differences. The aim is for faculty and students to examine and learn from critical academic discourse on diversity-related topics and then reflect together as a campus community on the importance of this intellectual work in transforming our campus and communities. Sponsored by Office of the Provost

  • Social Construction of Race: Moving from “Not Real” to Reality, facilitated by Dr. Jessica Carew in Alamance 203: In the United States context, we speak of race as though it is a biological reality without recognizing the ways in which the nation worked to construct it.  This session will examine the "Frankenstein" nature of the development, permanence, and importance of race in the U.S. Register here
  • People Diversity in U.S. Foreign Policy, facilitated by Dr. Rod Clare in Alamance 206: When speaking about diversity, Americans tend to look solely inwards. What does it mean when we look at how diversity plays a role in American foreign affairs? What do we mean by diversity and does it have different parameters for the nation as opposed to its relations to the outside world? Does it make a difference and if so, how? These questions and others are what will be explored in Dr. Rod Clare's reading and discussion on the topic of diverse diversity in American foreign relations. Register here
  • The War on Compassion, facilitated by Dr. Samantha DiRosa in Alamance 204: This session is based on the Carol J. Adams article of the same name, which controversially compares confined animal feeding operations to human genocide and speciesism to racism as a lens to critically discuss objectification and normalized violence. Register here
  • Living and Learning in the Contact Zone, facilitated by Dr. Kenn Gaither in Alamance 205: The session will use Mary Louise Pratt’s concept of a ‘contact zone’ to explore differences within and among communities. The seminar will apply Pratt’s notion of contact zones to the places we live and learn, producing moments that range from “rage, incomprehension and pain” to “revelation, mutual understanding and new wisdom” (p. 39). Register here
  • Unconscious and Semi-Conscious Bias, facilitated by Dr. Raj Ghoshal in Alamance 218: We all like to think of ourselves as fair-minded, but social science research shows that even well-intentioned people are susceptible to unconscious and semi-conscious biases around race, gender, age, and more. This interactive session explores how these biases affect us and begins to engage the question of how we can address them. Please bring a laptop or iPad if possible, but not required. Register here
  • Disability Rights: Can Higher Education Aim Higher?, facilitated by Dr. Julie Lellis in Alamance 215: This session will look at disability rights within the United States, and it will focus on case study by looking at how UNC-Chapel Hill handled the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Register here
  • Bodies, Power, and Gender, facilitated by Dr. Shannon Lundeen in Alamance 202: In this session, we will explore philosophical questions surrounding embodiment, gender difference, and gender inequality. Our discussion will be rooted in Iris Marion Young’s essay “Throwing Like a Girl,” which analyzes the way in which body comportment (the way that bodies move) reflects and perpetuates gender inequality. We will ask how our understandings and experiences of space and movement illuminate systematic inequality — and whether they also have the potential to undermine inequality. Register here
  • We Who Believe in Freedom: Race, Mothering, and Raising Black Sons, facilitated by Dr. Cherrel Miller-Dyce in Alamance 301: "Until the killing of black men, black mothers’ sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother’s sons, we who believe in freedom cannot rest.” –Ella Baker Register here

Monday, January 16
MLK, Jr. Beloved Community Celebration: Habitat for Humanity Building Blitz
Exact time TBD, it will be most of the day; you can come for all or some of it
Location TBD

Students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to help build a house with Habitat for Humanity. The organization has the goal of building an entire house within the week, and the Elon community is committed to providing concentrated assistance on Monday of that week. More details forthcoming. Transportation will be provided. Sponsored by Kernodle Center for Service Learning and Community Engagement; Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education

Tuesday, January 17
MLK, Jr. Beloved Community Celebration: College Coffee
12pm
McKinnon Hall

This special college coffee is part of the week long Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Beloved Community Celebration. There will be the Spread the Love Campaign and an accompanying performance. Sponsored by Student Involvement; Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education

Tuesday, January 17
The Spirit of Harriet Tubman
6:00pm
Whitley Auditorium

Diane Faison (Gibsonville, NC) shares a one-woman performance about the life of underground leader Harriet Tubman. She talks of Tubman’s childhood and youth as a slave and on her psychological and physical journey to freedom and eventual return to the South to lead hundreds of others to liberation. Admission is free, but a ticket is required. Tickets available beginning November 28 at the Center for the Arts Box Office. Sponsored by Cultural and Special Programs

Wednesday, January 18
wInterfaith Lunch Series: Hinduism
11:30am
Community Life Center, Elon Community Church
Register Here

Each Wednesday in Winter Term, we invite members of a faith community to share about what they believe during a community lunch. This Wednesday we will learn about Hinduism. Lunch is provided for students. Sponsored by Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Elon Community Church

Wednesday, January 18
Lauren Dunne Astley Memorial Lecture: Michael Kimmel, "Mars and Venus, or Planet Earth: Women and Men in a New Millenium"
6:00pm
LaRose Theatre
Register Here

A tireless advocate of gender equality, author Michael Kimmel is one of the world's leading experts on men and masculinities. He is the SUNY Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University (NY). With funding from the MacArthur Foundation, he founded the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities at Stony Brook in 2013. Sponsored by Women, Gender, and Sexualities Studies

Wednesday, January 18
MLK, Jr. Beloved Community Celebration: Oratorical Contest
7:30pm
Yeager Recital Hall (tentatively)

This is the second annual oratorical contest as part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Beloved Community Celebration. This year’s prompt is: “In his speech, “Strength to Love,” Martin Luther King Jr. wrote, “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” How do you interpret MLK’s statement? How can it connect to Elon University, and how can you apply it in the context of today’s society?” More information on how to sign up will be announced shortly. Sponsored by the Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education

Thursday, January 19
MLK, Jr. Beloved Community Celebration: Multi-Faith Service
12:00pm
McBride Gathering Space

Much of MLK’s work was rooted in his role as a religious leader. While he was a Christian minister, he also greatly influenced and was influenced by leaders of many other faith traditions. Students and staff connected to Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life from many different traditions will offer a service in the spirit of MLK and his life, passion, and principles. This year this special Numen Lumen will have the theme Share Your Light, Spread the Love. Join us as we recognize the relationship between of multi-faith and social justice. Sponsored by Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life; Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education

Thursday, January 19
MLK, Jr. Beloved Community Celebration: Social Justice Poetry Slam and Open Mic
7:00-9:00pm
Irazu

This poetry slam is part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Beloved Community Celebration. Students are encouraged to have a social justice lens to their performances. Solo and duo performances are welcome. Sponsored by the Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education