Winter Term Diversity Events

To sign up for any of the following workshops and events, please visit the registration page.

International Civil Rights Museum

The SGA is sponsoring bus trips to the International Civil Rights Museum in Greensboro. Contact the SGA office for more information.

Monday, January 6 – Monday, January 26
ADL Campus of Difference Student Engagement sessions
FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

First year students may register for a session immediately following course registration, or by using the events registration page.

During your time at Elon, you will have many opportunities to engage with individuals and communities with values and customs both similar to and different than your own. These experiences will happen not only in your daily interactions in class, on campus and in the residence halls, but also in the experiences in which you choose to participate: internships, leadership, service, study abroad and undergraduate research. 

The ADL Campus of Difference sessions will:
• Establish a common language for the campus community around issues of difference
• Allow you to explore your own culture and experiences and those of your fellow students
• Enhance your ability to communicate and connect with the wide range of people you will encounter while at Elon
• Prepare you to make the most of your Elon experience

Morning sessions: 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Moseley 215
Afternoon sessions: 1:30 - 5:30 p.m., Moseley 215

No sessions will be held on January 19th in observance of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.

Wednesday, January 7
Winterfaith Lunch and Learn - Unity Church
11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Community Life Center (Elon Community Church)

Every Wednesday in Winter Term, come and hear about religious traditions from around the world. Lunch is provided for students who register in advance. Faculty and staff can purchase lunch for $6.

Wednesday, January 7
Orange is the New Black Book Club – Sponsored by the Oaks Neighborhood Association
7:00 p.m., McCoy 107 (The Oaks Club Room)

The critically-acclaimed Netflix series has garnered immense popularity, but Orange is the New Black was originally written as a memoir of author Piper Kerman’s experience in a women’s correctional facility. Taken out of her comfort zone, Kerman witnesses the ironic injustices of the American penal system, while encountering moments of acceptance and wisdom from other inmates--whose stories are often misjudged and viewed as incomplete by those outside the system. This book club will facilitate critical analyses and engaging discussions that combine the entertainment factor of Kerman’s narrative with the systems of privilege that contribute to the broken state of American prisons.

We will have our first gathering on Wednesday, January 7 at 7 p.m. to distribute books and agree on a recurring weekly meeting time throughout Winter Term. The book club is limited to 20 spots, with priority given to Oaks Neighborhood residents.

Please contact Sean Rollolazo by Tuesday, January 5 to sign-up.

Thursday, January 8
Eli Clare, MLK Commemorative Speaker

Lunch and Learn: "Moving Beyond Pity & Inspiration: Disability as a Social Justice Issue"
12:00-1:15 p.m., Lindner 206

Afternoon Workshop: "At the Intersection of Queerness and Disability"
2:00-3:30 p.m., Belk Pavilion 208

Evening Dinner and Workshop: "Digging Deep: Thinking about Privilege"
6:00-8:00 p.m., Alamance 101

Eli Clare is a writer, speaker, activist and teacher addressing disability, gender, race, class, and sexuality in his work. He has cerebral palsy and identifies as genderqueer and as a trans man. He has a B.A. in Women’s Studies from Mills College and a M.F.A. from Goddard College. He is the author of two books, Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation (South End Press, 1999, 2009) and The Marrow’s Telling: Words in Motion (Homofactus Press, 2007), a collection of poetry. He also contributed to the 2003 anthology Queer Crips: Disabled Gay Men and Their Stories. Clare has received several awards for his work such as the Creating Change Award from the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and LGBT Artist of the Year from Michigan Pride, and frequently speaks at conferences and other events. His workshops will focus on disability rights and the intersections of LGBTQI and Disabilities.

Thursday, January 8
Diversity Book Club: Twelve Years a Slave
7:30 p.m., The Station at Mill Point

Station at Mill Point Residents who sign up will receive a free copy of the book and dinner each night of the book club (courtesy of the Station Neighborhood Association). The book chronicles the life of Solomon Northup who was a free man sold into slavery in the south. Meetings will be discussion based with some guiding questions focused on themes from the book.  Twelve Years a Slave was recently turned in a major motion picture which won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Open only to Station at Mill Point residents. Contact Nolan Patouillet for more details.

Sunday, January 11
Robert Jensen, MLK Commemorative Speaker

Evening Workshop: Student activism toward social justice
7:00-9:00 p.m., Isabella Cannon Room (Center for the Arts)

Robert Jensen is a professor in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas. Jensen is the author of several books including Arguing for Our Lives: A User’s Guide to Constructive Dialogue; We Are All Apocalyptic Now: On the Responsibilities of Teaching, Preaching, Reporting, Writing, and Speaking Out; The Heart of Whiteness: Confronting Race, Racism and White  Privilege; Citizens of the Empire: The Struggle to Claim Our Humanity; and Writing Dissent: Taking Radical Ideas from the Margins to the Mainstream. In his writing and teaching, Jensen draws on a variety of critical approaches to media and power and has addressed questions of race through a critique of white privilege and institutionalized racism.

Monday, January 12
Robert Jensen, MLK Commemorative Speaker

Lunch and Learn: "Beyond Multiculturalism"
12:00-1:15 p.m., Lindner 206

Afternoon Workshop: "We are All Apocalyptic Now: Moral Responsibilities in Crisis Times"
2:00-3:30 p.m., Belk Pavilion 208

Evening Workshop: "Addressing Institutionalized Racism"
7:00-9:00 p.m., Alamance 101

*See above for speaker bio.

Tuesday, January 13
Film screening of Living in the Overlap and Q and A with filmmaker Mary Dalton (Film is 28 minutes)
6:00 p.m., LaRose Digital Theater (Koury Business Center)

Living in the Overlap is the improbably true story of two girls growing up in Brooklyn in the 1940s, falling in love in the Midwest, and making a life together in North Carolina.  Lennie is an attorney focusing on LGBT issues, and Pearl is a retired professor working on various political issues.  They are surprised to have reached icon status for simply living their lives together.  The film includes public and private moments in Lennie and Pearl’s lives using interviews, archival material, and sequences shot during their efforts to defeat Amendment One, a constitutional amendment ensuring that marriage between one man and one woman is the only legally recognized domestic union in North Carolina. After 46 years together, Lennie and Pearl still have an indelible spark. The film won the Audience Awards at Inside Out Toronto and Reel Q and was nominated for the Iris Prize.

Tuesday, January 13
Conversation about student activism and dinner (open to Historic Neighborhood residents only)
6:00-7:00 p.m., McKinnon

Tuesday, January 13
Origami Identity Quilt (for Colonnades residents only)
7:30 p.m., Harper Hall

Colonnades residents will be making an Origami Quilt. Students will create a small origami square that they can decorate to represent their identities. All squares will then interlock to create a larger quilt that represents colonnades as a whole and all the individuals who make up this neighborhood. This event is for Colonnades residents only.

Wednesday, January 14
Winterfaith Lunch and Learn - Islam
11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Community Life Center (Elon Community Church)

Every Wednesday in Winter Term, come and hear about religious traditions from around the world. Lunch is provided for students who register in advance. Faculty and staff can purchase lunch for $6.

Thursday, January 15
Poverty Simulation
8:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

A poverty simulation is scheduled for January 15th from 8:30 – 11. Faculty interested in having their class participate should contact Buffie Longmire-Avital, the poverty simulation coordinator. Space is limited to 3-4 classes max.

Thursday, January 15
Kip Fulbeck, MLK Commemorative Speaker

Keynote: “Race, Sex and Tattoos”
6:00 p.m., McCrary Theatre

Kip Fulbeck is an artist, spoken word performer, author and filmmaker exploring multiracial identity. Part poet, part comedian and part pop culture critic, Fulbeck addresses diversity as a conversation about race, but also works with audiences to tackle the larger questions of who we are as individuals, how we define ourselves and how we engage with those around us. Fulbeck teaches art at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and has written several books, including Part Asian, 100% Hapa and Mixed: Portraits of Multiracial Kids. “Food for Thought:" Following the event in Colonnades, join an informal discussion with students to continue the conversation that will start at the event. This is open to students from all Neighborhoods and off-campus.

Thursday, January 15
Diversity Book Club: Twelve Years a Slave
7:30 p.m., The Station at Mill Point

Station at Mill Point Residents who sign up will receive a free copy of the book and dinner each night of the book club (courtesy of the Station Neighborhood Association). The book chronicles the life of Solomon Northup who was a free man sold into slavery in the south. Meetings will be discussion based with some guiding questions focused on themes from the book.  Twelve Years a Slave was recently turned in a major motion picture which won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Open only to Station at Mill Point residents. Contact Nolan Patouillet for more details.

Wednesday, January 21
Winterfaith Lunch and Learn - Judaism
11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., Community Life Center (Elon Community Church)

Every Wednesday in Winter Term, come and hear about religious traditions from around the world. Lunch is provided for students who register in advance. Faculty and staff can purchase lunch for $6.

Wednesday, January 21
Mei-Ling Hopgood, MLK Commemorative Speaker

Keynote: Chinese American Latina: Do you inherit or create your identity and culture?
6:00 p.m., Whitley Auditorium

Mei-Ling Hopgood is author of How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm and Lucky Girl and a freelance journalist who has written for various publications, ranging from the National Geographic Traveler and Marie ClaireMagazine to the Miami Herald and the Boston Globe. She has worked as a reporter with the Detroit Free Press, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and in the Cox Newspapers Washington bureau. A recipient of the National Headliner Best in Show, she has received several national and international journalism awards. She is an associate professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. A former president of the Asian American Journalism Association, Hopgood will speak on the complexity of cultural identity.

Thursday, January 22
Diversity Book Club: Twelve Years a Slave
7:30 p.m., The Station at Mill Point

Station at Mill Point Residents who sign up will receive a free copy of the book and dinner each night of the book club (courtesy of the Station Neighborhood Association). The book chronicles the life of Solomon Northup who was a free man sold into slavery in the south. Meetings will be discussion based with some guiding questions focused on themes from the book.  Twelve Years a Slave was recently turned in a major motion picture which won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Open only to Station at Mill Point residents. Contact Nolan Patouillet for more details. Contact Nolan Patouillet for more details.

Monday, January 26
Things you’ve always wanted to know
6:00 p.m., Daniel Commons (Danieley Center)

Your chance to ask anonymous questions related to different aspects of identity (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation). Prize Drawings. Event sponsored by Danieley Center Neighborhood Association.

Monday, January 26 and Tuesday, January 27
An Evening of French Theater
6:00 p.m., Yeager Recital Hall (Center for the Arts)

Students enrolled in the Winter Term course FRE 371: French Theater in Production will perform a work of French theater. Come enjoy an evening of theatrical prowess from a different perspective. English subtitles will be projected.

To sign up for any of the above workshops and events, please visit the registration page.