Conference Schedule

Friday November 15, 2019

3:00 – 4:30pm – Conference Check-In
Moseley Student Center, First Floor outside of McKinnon Hall

3:30 – 4:20pm – Conference Opening
Moseley Student Center, McKinnon Hall

4:30 – 5:30pm – Session #1
Moseley Student Center and Lakeside Hall

Difficult Dialogues

Presented by Kaye Usry, Damion Blake, Liza Taylor, & Jessica Carew, Faculty – Elon University – Lakeside 212
Members of the political science faculty at Elon University will share their strategies for facilitating productive dialogue about sensitive and controversial subjects.

“You’re Too Young to be Tired”: Advocating for and Taking Care of Yourself as an Emerging Professional

Presented by Kiara Hines, Graduate Student – Elon University – Lakeside 214
New professionals can feel pressured to accept every task given to them as they begin to establish themselves in the field. Additionally, stressors outside of work such as financial instability or lack of community can inhibit productivity and job satisfaction. It can be intimidating to say no to a project or express feelings of being overwhelmed because oftentimes supervisors may find such sentiments to be indicative of evasive behavior due to socialized generational or positional expectations. This presentation is intended to provide emerging professionals with strategies to communicate concerns effectively and understand how personal wellness impacts professional performance.

Writing Op-eds for Social Change

Presented by Raj Ghoshal, Faculty – Elon University – Moseley 105
Want to share your informed views on an issue of social change, social justice, or public policy that you care about with thousands of readers? Hundreds of newspapers publish op-eds, which are like editorials but can be written by anyone and easily reach large audiences. This workshop addresses how to choose a topic, effective writing and sending strategies, and ways op-eds can be used as class assignments. Attendees seeking ways to put their knowledge and passions to use in the service of social change and public outreach will find this workshop of interest. Bring a laptop if possible.

Exploring Anti-Black Racism in Higher Education

Presented by Brandon Bell, Staff  – Elon University – Moseley 215
Anti-Black racism is prejudice, attitudes, beliefs, stereotyping or discrimination that is directed at people of African descent and is rooted in their unique history and experience of enslavement and colonization. deeply embedded in the global experience, this session explores the construction and experience of anti-black racism and strategies to dismantle it in Higher Education.

So We Really Doing This, Or Nah: A Culturally Competent Framework for Collective Social Change

Presented by John Robinson-Miller IV & Aminant Bashorun, Staff – NC State – Moseley 216
This session will explore: 1) your relationship with social identities, 2) how our bodies are impacted by institutional manifestations of oppression, and 3) how to unapologetically take up space in the places that we occupy. No matter how often or to what degree you move your body, this is an accessible gentle reminder to find joy in this difficult work.

Fueling Your Fire: Fostering Fireproof Leadership and Understanding Burnout

Presented Susan Derasmo ’20, Student – Elon University – Moseley 217 
In college, students, faculty and staff are given seemingly endless opportunities to become involved. Yet, busy culture and its glorification has been a long standing issue on college campuses. This presentation aims to open up the conversation around the shaping of student involvement culture and ways we can foster fireproof leadership among our peers and within ourselves. Strategies to develop fireproof leadership and overcome burnout will be discussed.



5:30 – 5:40pm – Shabbat Candle Lighting
McKinnon Hall

5:40 – 6:40pm – Session #2
Moseley Student Center and Lakeside Hall

Understanding the Power & Privilege that we hold with our Social Identity

Presented by Leslie Cavin, Staff – Western Carolina University – Lakeside 212
In this interactive session, participants will grapple with big questions, such as, “Who are you?” “Why does it matter?” “How are Power & Privilege related to your Identity?” and “How does who you are relate to you as a leader?”. Participants will unpack what makes up their social identity by creating their own Social Identity Wheel. Afterwards, we will spend time discussing how the issues of power and privilege relate back their individual identities and further relates to their identity as a leader.

How Higher Education Upholds White Supremacy

Presented by Amanda Alberti, Staff – Elon University – Lakeside 214
How Higher Education Upholds White Supremacy will examine how colleges and universities uphold white supremacy particularly within residence life and student affairs. The presenters will examine how the work taking place within higher education adversely affect future generations of professionals and students. The presenters will provide tangible practices to help combat problems on your campus.

Black Girls Deserve the World

Presented by Shawna Harris-Lenoir ‘20, Chandler Vaughan ‘21, Taylor McFadden ‘20, Brittany Tuwamo ‘20 & Destiny Frett ‘20, Students – Elon University – Moseley 105
This session will discuss findings from the 2019 Justice for Black Girls Conference. The purpose of this conference was to offer meaningful education and resources for those concerned with elevating the voices of Black girls in the juvenile legal system. Elon’s chapter of the National Council of Negro Women and the Black Student Union had the opportunity to critically examine this vulnerable population. The conference presented a plethora of information that addressed past traumas, healing processes and the barriers in educational advancement for black girls from key speakers such as Monique W. Morris, Briana Baker, Ree Botts, and Marline Francois-Madden. This session will highlight the ways in which black girls are disadvantaged through institutional oppression and further criminalized in our current society.

Behind the Mask to Live an Authentic Life!

Presented by Jarrod Rudd, Staff – Elon University – Moseley 215
Have you ever felt like you had to be perfect, so you can be a credible person in a variety of spaces, or felt like you needed to work harder so that you can “prove yourself”? How do we learn to show up confidently in spaces, and how can one learn to do so authentically? This session will explore how to be authentic wherever you are and challenge others to do so as well, instead of falling into the impostor syndrome trap. Explore ways to overcome this way of thinking and be able to live, learn and lead authentically through life!

Your House, Our Home

Presented by Detric Robinson-Miller, Staff – Elon University – Moseley 216
Imagine you have been invited to stay in a house built for someone else and were told to “make our house your home!” Whether you are a student, staff, faculty, or administrator, your presence on a college campus mirrors a stay in someone else’s house and each of us are temporary guests. And, by accepting an invitation to be present on campus, we have a responsibility to contribute to and cultivate a culture that is inclusive and equitable. This presentation will explore what a sense of belonging may feel like and the various roles we may plan in contributing to that sense of belonging.

Using Slow Violence as a Tool for Oppression

Presented by Stephen Braye, Faculty – Elon University – Moseley 217
Using Rob Nixon’s concept of “slow violence,” this session will look at the many applications of slow violence in our local and global community. Participants will leave with a clear understanding of “slow violence,” its use in our daily lives, and the powers that such violence serves. In our discussions, we will identify ways we can both expose and address such violence to aid those oppressed.


6:50 – 7:50pm – Dinner & Friday Keynote, Dr. Jonathan McElderry
Moseley Student Center, McKinnon Hall

8:00-9:00pm – Dessert Social and Networking
Moseley Student Center, First Floor outside of Ward Octagon

Saturday, November 16, 2019

8:30-9:20am – Conference Check-In
Moseley Student Center, First Floor outside of McKinnon Hall

8:30-9:20amBreakfast
Moseley Student Center, First Floor outside of Ward Octagon

9:30-10:30am – Session #3
Moseley Student Center and Lakeside Hall

Sex, self-knowledge, and empowerment through an intersectional lens in today's hookup culture

Presented by Shannon Lundeen, Faculty – Elon University  – Lakeside 212
This session is primarily geared toward college students with an emphasis on women’s pleasure and empowerment. We will examine the systematic production of ignorance about women’s bodies, sexual desires and pleasure and how this can contribute to unsatisfying and disempowering experiences of sex and sexual intimacy when hooking up. We will discuss the expectations for and social consequences of participating in hookup culture and how those expectations and consequences differ based on markers of social identity (e.g., gender, race, religion, age, sexual orientation, etc.). We will explore how individual and social change is possible through self-knowledge and changing the script(s) of hooking up so that people, regardless of the social identities they hold, can have empowering and pleasurable sexual experiences whether they are “hooking up,” engaging in self-pleasure, or involved in a long-term relationship.

Making It Possible: Addressing Privilege, Representation, and Accessibility in the Classroom

Presented by Mariana Poole, Faculty – Elon University – Lakeside 214
As the person standing in the front, professors have a great deal of power in the classroom. We control the material, the teaching methods, the workload, and the relative importance of each assignment. We must balance the need to pass on students who are prepared for the next level with the need to ensure that a path to success exists for every student we teach. No student should ever be set up to fail. This session will discuss practical strategies for maximizing equity and accessibility, promoting diversity through representation, and identifying and addressing the way privilege impacts our classrooms.

Hot Takes: Working through Discomfort of Conflict

Presented by Rebecca Menard ‘20 & Veda Patil ‘21, Students – UNC Chapel Hill – Moseley 105
This session will focus on the inevitable moments of tension within a leadership team and give participants skills in order to manage and mitigate conflict. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of the assertive belief system for leaders focused on social justice. The first third will be focused on acquisition of theory/knowledge, the second third on practicing these skills, and the last third on reflection and action planning. The primary learning outcome is that students will understand when and how to utilize assertive yet empathetic communication with their peers.

Relationships Matter: Creating Relationship-Rich Classrooms and Campuses

Presented by Leo Lambert, President Emeritus – Elon University – Moseley 215
Leo Lambert and Peter Felten of Elon University recently completed a study of 15 diverse campuses examining the critical role human relationships play in the quality of undergraduate education. Decades of research have shown that student-faculty, student-staff and student-student interactions influence retention, the quality of undergraduate learning, graduation rates, and identity development. Lambert and Felten interviewed 385 people to collect contemporary narratives of relationship-rich undergraduate education. In Dr. Lambert’s presentation, he will use voices from 15 campuses to demonstrate that every student must 1) experience “relentless welcome” and deep care; 2) experience excitement about learning through relationships formed with inspiring faculty members; 3) develop a web of significant relationships in college, including “mentors of the moment”; and 4) have meaningful interactions with mentors to explore big questions of identity, purpose, and potential contributions to the wider world.

Reimagining StrengthsQuest through Critical Perspectives

Presented by Dana Pursley, Staff – Elon University– Moseley 216
Many colleges and universities utilize Gallup’s StrengthsQuest inventory as a leadership development tool. StrengthsQuest is an online assessment designed to help you discover your top 5 talents and leveraged your strengths in a variety of settings. However, StrengthsQuest’s prominence is largely based on pop culture rather than empirical research. This session will utilize critical leadership perspectives and critical whiteness theory to deconstruct and reconstruct StrengthsQuest in a way that centers inclusion. Please note: you must have taken StrengthsQuest prior to attending and bring your top 5 talents to this session.

Trans 103: The Basics and Beyond

Presented by Jay Tiemann ‘21, Student  – Elon University – Moseley 217
This session is designed for people who want to learn the basics of trans identities, nonbinary/genderqueer identities, specific barriers trans people face in society, ways to make universities more trans-inclusive, and tips for being an active ally. We will also discuss the social construction of gender as well as sex, model respectful language for discussing trans people, and reflect on how to use cis privilege for good.


10:40-11:40am – Session #4
Moseley Student Center and Lakeside Hall

Built on our Shoulders: Higher Education and Students of Color

Presented by Alonzo Cee, Graduate Student – Elon University – Lakeside 212
This session will let us talk about the origins of higher education and the toll it has taken on students of color. This session will delve into the historic oversight/neglect of students of color by colleges and universities, and the role we have as leaders to understand and uplift communities of color.

Exploring Oppression, Connection, and Change through Image Theater

Presented by Leslie Garvin, Staff – Elon University – Lakeside 214
Theater of the Oppressed uses theater as a means of promoting social and political change. These participatory theatrical forms were developed by Brazilian theater practitioner and activist Augusto Boal in the 1970s. Participants will learn about the history of T.O. and receive an overview of T.O. methods with special emphasis on Image Theater. Image Theater involves storytelling and collaborative problem solving related to   oppressive situations, including the role of witnesses and allies. This is a highly interactive session that involves lots of movement.

Whiteness in the Wilderness: Reflections on the Self and the Other

Presented by Nate Jones ‘20, Student – Elon University – Moseley 105
This session presents more questions than it provides answers, and serves to connect issues of social justice and human relating with issues of ecological justice and relating with land. How does relating to the natural world inform our interpersonal relating? What peoples and cultures have historically been categorized as naturalistic and primitive or developed and civilized, and why? Further, we will challenge the very theme of the conference by asking whether knowing oneself is possible, and what expectations come with understanding the self as fully knowable? Our goal for the session is to think critically about ourselves and the world, and to depart in deeper relation to both.

Strategies for Creating Change through Campus Coalitions

Presented by Payton Head – 2019 Keynote Speaker – Moseley 215
In this session students will discuss ways that they can build coalitions through the use of existing campus resources and structures to create change. Participants will reflect on what they hope to accomplish and how they use leadership as a tool to achieve their goals. Attendees will identify potential partnerships and networks to assist them in the work they hope to accomplish.

Design Thinking Deeper Conversations for Social Change

Presented by Danielle Lake, Faculty, Raleigh Jones ‘20, & Mikayla Ford ‘22, Students – Elon University – Moseley 216
What are the basic design thinking methods and approaches? And how might they help us navigate challenging conversations around social justice and equity? What are some examples of design thinking for equity and inclusion? This workshop answers these questions and more. Participants leave with ideas for applying design thinking to issues of inclusion and social justice.

Student-Led Diversity Training: Bringing the “isms” to life, student to student

Presented by Krishauna Hines-Gaither, & Paula Hernandez, Staff, Andrea Muñiz Alvarado & Chloe Wells, Students – Guilford College – Moseley 217
Is your school growing in diversity, or not? Is your school still struggling to find meaningful ways to discuss race, class, sexuality, religion, immigration, etc? Has your campus experienced microaggressions, hate speech, racism, homophobia, transphobia, slurs or otherwise? Join the Multicultural Leadership Scholars Program (MLSP) of Guilford College as they provide a model for student-led diversity training and facilitation. Multicultural Leadership Scholars facilitate diversity training to over 400 first year students each year. Staff will share how the MLSP program was conceived. Students will share their first- hand experiences (the highs and the lows) of student-led facilitation.


11:50am-12:50pm – Lunch
Moseley Student Center – McKinnon Hall

1:00-2:00pm – Session #5
Moseley Student Center and Lakeside Hall

Leadership for Social Change Listening Party

Presented by Melanie Bullock, Staff & Sydney Simmons ‘20, Student – Elon University – Lakeside 212
Music is a powerful tool. Messages in music allow us to take in the world, learn lessons in leading and connect with others. Join us as we explore leadership and social change through lyrics and messages artists reveal in various songs. The workshop facilitators will play clips of music from various genres and spark thoughtful conversation through a shared listening experience. Listen together, and go deeper with discussion and stories around leadership and social change.

Still Possible: Promoting Immigration in a Restrictive Era

Presented by Katherine Reynolds, Faculty – Elon University School of Law  – Lakeside 214
Are you asking how you can support immigrant rights in the wake of restrictions on legal immigration, building walls, and caging children? Your expertise can be used to demand that refugees, asylum-seekers, and immigrants are treated with human dignity as they seek to enter and integrate in the United States. Challenge yourself to speak up for your neighbor, through your words, actions, and collaboration.

 

Build Your Board of Directors: Preparing Your Leadership Table

Shannon Alford, Staff – Salem College – Moseley 105
Women of color continue to be underrepresented in leadership roles within higher education. This presentation will address the leadership gap by sharing the skills to create a strategic mentoring network. Using the analogy of board of directions, participants will increase awareness of multiple pathways to leadership roles within higher education. Participants will learn the tools needed to strategically create their individualized board of directors and accomplish their personal and professional leadership goals. Ultimately, one must learn to unapologetically ask oneself-Who Deserves a Seat at My Table of Life? Invite Them!

The Legacy of Redlining in our Leadership

Presented by Augusto Peña, Staff – UNC Greensboro – Moseley 215
Participants will learn about the origins of redlining as a practice that continues to impact what we know, who we know and what opportunities we have.  We will also explore how our preference for sameness can have unintended impact and consequences. We will see our communities in new ways and consider the individual power we all have to interrupt oppression.

Phoenix Flops: Failing Forward from Impossible to I'm Possible

Jack Taylor ‘21, Daniela Nasser ‘20, Students & Caroline Dean, Graduate Student  – Elon University – Moseley 216
Failure takes place in many forms throughout our day to day lives. These uncomfortable moments range from small mishaps to big mistakes — which are often amplified when working with people from different backgrounds. This session will discuss diversity and inclusion through an imperfect lens and will highlight the resiliency needed for such work. We’ve all flopped, but this session will help us learn how to keep moving forward together.

 

Masculinities 101

Presented by Timothy Boles ‘20, Student & Shannon Finney, Graduate Student – Elon University – Moseley 217
This session explores the idea of masculinity and gender norms in the United States. In this session, we will engage the audience in interactive activities that examine what society has defined as “being a man” and how conforming to this societal standard at the expense of our values creates harmful situations for those around us. This session will also provide an opportunity for individuals to learn to develop empathy towards themselves and others as a way of bridging the gap and understanding the experiences of others to create a sense of community and connection to others.


2:10-3:10pm – Session #6
Moseley Student Center and Lakeside Hall

Nothing personal, just cultural: Navigating the challenges of a multicultural work-space.

Presented by Barjinder Singh, Faculty – Elon University – Lakeside 212
Whether it’s the student body (in schools/colleges/universities) or the workforce (in organizations/institutions) cultural diversity is on a constant rise. In academic settings, students are required to work and collaborate with diverse students from various cultures; while in work settings, employees are required to perform in multicultural teams. Multicultural scenarios present unprecedented challenges that can be daunting for many; and to be successful, cultural competence is a must. Therefore, the purpose of this session is to educate students to recognize, acknowledge and understand these multicultural differences and to prepare them for such challenges by enhancing their cultural competence.

Taking Up Space: Exploring Power Dynamics through Movement

Presented by John Robinson-Miller IV, Staff – NC State – Lakeside 214
This session will explore: 1) your relationship with social identities, 2) how our bodies are impacted by institutional manifestations of oppression, and 3) how to unapologetically take up space in the places that we occupy. No matter how often or to what degree you move your body, this is an accessible gentle reminder to find joy in this difficult work.

Seeing beyond Ourselves: Experience Mapping in Design Thinking

Presented by Danielle Lake, Faculty, Mackenzie Hahn ‘20 & Orlanzel Washington ‘21, Students – Elon University – Moseley 105
How might we better understand how others’ experience the interactions we create? How might we adjust our actions to better support others? Experience mapping is a key design research and prototyping method. It helps us explore how people might be experiencing a situation. This process can help us  develop a fuller understanding of the situation, identify areas for exploration, create new ideas and options for supporting others, and practice those ideas over time.

This is Exhausting: Dissecting The Toxicity of Unintentionally Mispronouning Students & Other Queer Microaggression

Presented by Ryan McKeel, Graduate Student – UNC Greensboro – Moseley 215
Working with gender diverse students, faculty, and staff is a common thread in our field; Higher Education professionals often are the first to promote the use of including pronouns in emails, presentations, and other various outlets of communications. The fact remains, however, that mispronouncing occurs on our campus’ on a consistent basis. Join this interactive session as we understand the importance of using queer-friendly language in our field while we also navigate how to best support our queer students and colleagues through our interactions with our gender diverse individuals.

Undocu-Allyship: A an engaging conversation led by students to become an effective ally and advocate for undocumented immigrants

Presented by Jovani Mendez-Sandoval ‘22 & Caroline Enright ‘20, Students – Elon University – Moseley 216
Created by members of Elon’s student organization Immigrant Realities, Undocu-Allyship Workshop is a bias reduction program designed to spark conversations around immigration and citizenship. Attendees will engage in identity activation and intersectionality activities as we make connections between our shared visible and invisible identities. Workshop attendees will learn about the power of language and how xenophobia and dehumanization orient the words we use to talk about immigration. By the end of the workshop participants will be more aware of their own biases towards immigrants and learn tangible ways they can become advocates on behalf of these individuals.

Masculinities 101

Presented by Timothy Boles ‘20, Student & Shannon Finney, Graduate Student – Elon University – Moseley 217
This session explores the idea of masculinity and gender norms in the United States. In this session, we will engage the audience in interactive activities that examine what society has defined as “being a man” and how conforming to this societal standard at the expense of our values creates harmful situations for those around us. This session will also provide an opportunity for individuals to learn to develop empathy towards themselves and others as a way of bridging the gap and understanding the experiences of others to create a sense of community and connection to others.


3:20-4:20pm – Coffee/Snack Break & Roundtable Session
Moseley Student Center – McKinnon Hall

Leading Change

Facilitated by Leo Lambert, President Emeritus – Elon University • Table #1
How do you create meaningful change on a college or university campus? Campus environments are complex with systems of shared governance, layers of administration, formal strategic planning and budgeting processes, as well as deeply embedded institutional cultures that may either facilitate or inhibit positive change. Meaningful and lasting change is often spurred by grassroots ideas supported by people in formal leadership positions such as presidents, provosts, and deans. Our roundtable will discuss questions such as: How can you lead from your position as a faculty member, staff member, or student? How do you build relationships on campus to foster change?

Leadership: Creating and sustaining a thriving community

Facilitated by Connie Book, President – Elon University  • Table #2
In a university community, we each have a responsibility to contribute to the creation of an environment in which all students, faculty, and staff have the opportunity to learn, thrive, and grow. This roundtable, facilitated by President Book, will discuss ways we can each contribute to these efforts individually, as well as the important responsibility and opportunity leaders within our community have to make a difference.

Cultural Stereotypes Portrayed In Film And How It Affects The Classrooms?

Facilitated by Laticia Taylor & Victoria Murrell, Graduate Students – Elon University • Table #3
This discussion will explore the detrimental outcomes of stereotyping marginalized cultural groups in films and how it continues to create educational bias within the classroom. Black minority students are at risk for dropping out, committing crimes and becoming jobless.

We argue that the stereotypes shown in films are creating a high level of tension between teachers and minority students. Throughout the educational system, minority students are not given the same quality of education as their white peers. Our goal for the presentation is too form open dialogue discussing the issues minority students face in the classroom.

Cuerpo Talk: The Memoir of a Gringuita

Facilitated by Emily Gomez, Faculty – Elon University • Table #4
“Cuerpo Talk: The Memoir of a Gringita,” is an autobiographical research solo on the evolution of Cuban dance forms from the 1960’s to present day. This timeline accompanies the path of Cuban culture from pre-communism to post communism and its progression. Dance influences from both the island of Cuba, and the Americanized version of Cuban dance in Miami are used to show the transformation of cultural identity. It concerns the exploration of identity politics through a Cuban-American lens in modern day society. It delves deeper into the beliefs and cultural shift of Cuban-Americans across multi-generations, and is illustrated through a comparative analysis of Cuban dance forms culminating in a choreography based performance. It provides information on the dual representations of Cuban culture that exist, and spreads awareness of the divide that has been created amongst the generations.

So You Want to Work in Higher Ed? Pro Tips and Lessons Learned

Facilitated by Augusto Peña, Staff – UNC Greensboro • Table #5
Facilitator will share stories from their journey over 16+ years of working in higher education.  Highlights will include navigating a master’s degree while working full-time, lots of on the job learning, finding networks, sponsors, advocates, and mentors, battling fatigue, armoring up for diversity work, finding opportunities, and making oneself useful and indispensable.

Interfaith Leadership on College Campuses

Facilitated by Caroline Penfield ‘22, Student – Elon University • Table #6
This roundtable will surround the cultural, religious, and spiritual diversity within interfaith. Interfaith work supports diversity on campuses by increasing knowledge and tolerance for peoples’ deepest held values. The roundtable will highlight cultural competency as a skill for interfaith leaders, and discuss how to encourage this and other skills on college campuses. The discussion will recognize religious pluralism as a goal for interfaith work, and will be facilitated by Multifaith Interns from Elon University’s Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life.

Being an Effective Ally

Facilitated by Nikki Cronin ‘22, Student – Elon University • Table #7
The roundtable will cover how people work, both individually and collaborating with others, to support groups and function as allies. The discussion will give participants an opportunity to examine why they believe being an ally and leader is important and how they want to continue to work toward that in the future.

How Do We Talk About Immigration?

Facilitated by Sophia Diaz ‘20 & Eve Ritsema ’19, Student – Elon University • Table #8
Facilitated by leaders from Elon’s Student Organization Immigrant Realities, this discussion focuses on the power of language and how xenophobia and dehumanization orient the words we use to talk about immigrant populations. We will define and analyze common language used and misused when discussing immigration and citizenship. In our discussion, we will hope to determine how our language can be used to promote inclusion for these populations.

Supporting the Caregivers and Children of Our Future

Facilitated by Joyce Llopis-Martell ‘21 & Caren Aveldañez ‘21, Students – Elon University • Table #9
Children are empty slates, waiting to be filled with information, experiences, and boundless possibilities, but to open the doors to these requires resources that are sometimes not even available during pregnancy. In Alamance County, teen pregnancies are happening at significantly younger ages (13 and younger). These children themselves, particularly minority girls, have few opportunities allotted to them due to lack of family/cultural support, mental health resources, and education. Although these girls may be on birth control, doctors fail to tell them that as their weight increases, birth control can become less effective. How can we work to improve systems to provide increased possibilities for teenage mothers and their children? What ways do our institutions fail to protect our most vulnerable populations?

Latinx Representation in Media

Facilitated by Mackenzie Martinez ‘21, Student – Elon University • Table #10
When was the last time you saw a movie with a Latinx lead? Can’t remember? It’s no surprise, a recent study has found that although Latinx people make up nearly one quarter of the US population, over the last 12 years they have only made up 4.5% of speaking roles and 3% of the lead characters. Numbers are similarly dismal for Latinx people behind the screen, particularly for women. So what does this mean for future possibilities for Latinx folks in the US? How is it possible to reshape such a large and influential industry? In what ways do the ideals and representation in movies contribute to shaping our media and our perceptions of communities?

Black Girls Becoming

Facilitated by Nicole Mitchell ‘22, Student –Wake Forest University • Table #11
As black women, we are told who we are and what we amount to before we are able to define ourselves. As two black college girls, we will share our stories of exploring the intersection of our identities to discover our authentic self. The Black Girls Becoming roundtable discussion aims to center and magnify the voices of black women as they begin their journey in becoming women of purpose, excellence, and wholeness. Our discussion will be the beginning of black women desiring to reorient their lives to manifest their dreams and passions while igniting their inner fire.

Unlocking Potential through Creative Confidence

Facilitated by Morgan Kearns ‘22, Student – Elon University • Table #12
What changes from the freedom of believing you can do anything as a child to the utter fear of “failure” as an undergraduate? Where do we come up with the line between creative and non-creative? One of the first steps in making the impossible possible is realizing that you can achieve anything, something that many lose as they grow up. Looking at creative confidence, we will discuss roadblocks around failure, ambiguity, messiness, and the unknown that stops some great ideas from finding their place in the world.

Built on our Shoulders: Higher Education and Students of Color

Facilitated by Alonzo Cee, Graduate Student – Elon University • Table #13
Let us talk about the origins of higher education and the toll it has had on students of color. This session will delve into the historic oversight/neglect of students of color by colleges and universities, and the role we have as leaders to understand and uplift communities of color.

Diversity Exposure

Facilitated by Abby Weaver ‘22, Student – Elon University • Table #14
Everyone grows up in a unique way that impacts how they understand the world around them today. College can be the first time some of us are experiencing new cultures and ideas which can be eye opening but also intimidating to process. It is important to recognize and reflect our previously held understandings and look toward further expanding our world view to best appreciate others’ differences.

Successful Because of The Odds

Facilitated by Patrick Brundidge ‘22, Student – Elon University • Table #15
Elon’s Army ROTC program has gifted me with valuable lessons in leadership, and discipline. With that being said, Elon’s ROTC program has also put me in between two communities. On one side, there’s the challenges of being the only African American in an all white program. On the other side, i’ve had to deal with being ostracized by members within the African American community for being the “token black”. For my roundtable discussion, I would like to discuss ways in which we can use a situation that seems to be against us, to be successful.

Hip-Hop & Hyper-masculinity

Facilitated by Derrick Luster ‘20, Student – Elon University • Table #16
This roundtable unpacks the history of hyper-masculinity within Hip-Hop. The goal of this session is to walk through rap songs and discuss how hyper-masculinity exudes from contemporary and historic Hip-Hop song lyrics and topics.

oSTEM: Cultivating LGBTQIA Advocacy within STEM

Facilitated by Christopher Adamik ‘20, Student – Elon University • Table #17
As sex and gender are still used interchangeably within most biological courses, I subconsciously knew my response reiterating the difference between the two would culminate into a failing grade; but it had to be done. In our table discussion, let’s talk about problems we see in the classroom that immediately and latently affect LGBTQIA students and possible solutions to these classroom malpractices. We will talk about topics that could be possibly triggering, so please respect this brave space with intentional listening and mutual respect. There’s a stark difference between DNA and RNA; let’s teach that difference between sex and gender.

Compassion and Gender

Facilitated by Hugh Goldstein ‘23, Student – Elon University • Table #18

On October 25th, 2019 Barack Obama stated, “That there is nothing weak about kindness and compassion. There is nothing weak about looking out for others. There is nothing weak about being honorable”.

So why is it that we shame those who are kind? If one is loud and intimating, we assume that they are a leader, and hence should be taken more seriously. This form of leadership is all to often engrained in male patriarchy. Men use systems of power to dominate social settings and assert superiority over other men, women, and their non-binary peers.

Within this roundtable discussion, we will acknowledge these power dynamics and create a meaningful dialogue about the suppression of other identities often seen as “weak.” We will try to understand a leader can use kindness and compassion towards men, women, and anyone in-between and still move a mountain.

How Can We Best Serve Gender Diverse Students?

Facilitated by Ryan McKeel, Graduate Student – UNC Greensboro • Table #19

Doing the ImPossible: Breaking the Cycle of Abuse

Facilitated by Jazmin Campbell ‘22, Student – Elon University • Table #20
In this discussion I will share my experience of intimate partner violence as well as figures about abuse, particularly pertaining to women of color and those with other marginalized identities, and how to work towards healing. I intend to use this space to facilitate a discussion about the particular crossroads of intimate partner violence between members of marginalized communities, two lived experiences which often intersect and create a complex narrative that is frequently overlooked.

Brown Faces In White Spaces

Facilitated by Shannon Alford & Cynthia Jones, Staff – Salem College • Table #21
Women of color continue to be underrepresented in leadership roles within higher education especially at predominately white institutions (PWIs). This roundtable will address some of the challenges women of color encounter due to their intersectionality of race and gender. Skills will be shared on how to strategically navigate “double jeopardy” as a professional in higher education. Participants will increase awareness of resources for them as women of color within higher education. In addition, participants will learn the tools needed to strategically create healthy working relationships and boundaries to accomplish their personal and professional leadership goals.

Working through the Discomfort of Conflict

Facilitated by Rebecca Menard ‘20 & Veda Patil ‘21, Students – UNC Chapel Hill • Table #22
This discussion will focus on the inevitable moments of tension within a leadership team and give participants skills in order to manage and mitigate conflict. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of the assertive belief system for leaders focused on social justice. The first third will be focused on acquisition of theory/knowledge, the second third on practicing these skills, and the last third on reflection and action planning. The primary learning outcome is that students will understand when and how to utilize assertive yet empathetic communication with their peers.

So We Really Doing This, Or Nah: A Culturally Competent Framework for Collective Social Change

Facilitated by John Robinson-Miller IV & Aminant Bashorun, Staff – NC State • Table #23
Do you feel ineffective? Tired of working in silos? Annoyed by over-programming? This roundtable is a crash course on how to set a common agenda, establish responsibilities, and encourage accountability to STAY IN YOUR LANE. Learn how to apply the Collective Impact framework to leverage individuals and student organizations for more effective advocacy and social change on a college campus.


4:30-5:30pm – Keynote Speaker, Payton Head
Moseley Student Center – Lakeside Hall