Naomi Falk, artist talk and closing reception

Monday, October 1
Gallery 406, Arts West, 5:30 p.m.

Falk’s work ruminates on our relationships and collaborations with the manufactured and natural landscapes we inhabit. It contemplates the struggles and connections we have with each other and the need to find a place to call our own. In the current climate, politically and environmentally, how do we find balance between staked territory and collective community? Under the specter of rapidly diminishing polar ice caps and other worries, what measures do we take to feel safe and at what cost? Where do we go from here?

Naomi Falk received an MFA from Carnegie Mellon University. She has exhibited regionally and nationally, and has done residencies in Germany, Iceland, New York, Vermont, and the Faroe Islands. Falk currently is an Assistant Professor at the School of Visual Art & Design at the University of South Carolina. Exhibition continues through October 6.


Tiq Milan, “A Man by My Own Design: Reimagining Masculinity from a Trans Experience”

Monday, October 1
Yeager Recital Hall, 6 p.m.

Lauren Dunne Astley Memorial Lecture

Join writer, speaker and activist Tiq Milan as he talks about his experience as a Black trans man navigating masculinity with intentionality. In a society where gender roles often lead to toxic masculinity, Milan discusses being a “man of his own design” where he re-constructs masculinity from a feminist perspective.

Tiq Milan has been an advocate and media maker in the LGBT community for more than a decade. An educator and mentor, Tiq carved a niche for himself as a media advocate and one of the leading voices for transgender equality. He is the recipient of several awards from organizations like The Hispanic Black Gay Coalition, Black Transman Advocacy Inc., The National Trans Latina Coalition and The National Pride Index. He’s also been recognized by BET, Ebony Magazine, and MTV.

Supported and co-sponsored by the Lauren Dunne Astley Memorial Lecture Endowment, The Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences, Women’s, Gender & Sexualities Studies, the Gender & LGBTQIA Center, and the Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education. 


Elon Core Forum #2
Mark D. Gearan, director of the Institute of Politics (IOP) at Harvard Kennedy School, “The influence of power and resistence in historical and contemporary interactions”

Themes: advocacy, civic engagement, politics and society
Tuesday, October 2
Great Hall of Global Commons, 8 a.m. and 2:20 p.m.

Co-sponsored by Study USA


Maggie M. Williams, “Art History and Public Medievalism”

Tuesday, October 2
Yeager Recital Hall, 6:30 p.m.

Art History Lecture Series

The history of art—particularly medieval art—might seem irrelevant to our daily lives. But images, screens, and visual culture play an enormous role in twenty-first-century culture, and we often encounter medieval references in extremely politicized contexts. What are an art historian’s responsibilities in this arena, and how can they contribute to public scholarship beyond the university? In this presentation, Maggie M. Williams, a founding member of the Material Collective (thematerialcollective.org), will discuss how and why she has worked to combine activism and public outreach with academic scholarship. Her talk will address the relevance of art history and the study of the past to life and politics in the contemporary world.


Radical Black Love: A Political Act

Tuesday, October 2
Whitley Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Join writer, speaker and activist Tiq Milan as he talks about his experience as a Black trans man navigating masculinity with intentionality. In a society where gender roles often lead to toxic masculinity, Milan discusses being a “man of his own design” where he re-constructs masculinity from a feminist perspective.

Kim Katrin Milan
Co-Founder of The People Project & Activist for Justice and Inclusion

Kim’s ‘The People Project’ is an initiative to bring forth local and international community development through alternative education, art­-activism and collaboration. Her presentations are anchored in a modern version of The Golden Rule. Rather than assuming the way you want to be treated is the standard for all, Kim encourages audiences to treat people the way they want to be treated, which means we have to ask and listen.

Tiq Milan
Journalist, Transgender Advocate & Media Consultant

Tiq Milan has been an advocate and media maker in the LGBT community for more than a decade. An educator and mentor, Tiq carved a niche for himself as a media advocate and one of the leading voices for transgender equality. He is the recipient of several awards from organizations like The Hispanic Black Gay Coalition, Black Transman Advocacy Inc., The National Trans Latina Coalition and The National Pride Index. He’s also been recognized by BET, Ebony Magazine, and MTV.

Supported and co-sponsored by the Lauren Dunne Astley Memorial Lecture Endowment, The Fund for Excellence in the Arts and Sciences, Women’s, Gender & Sexualities Studies, the Gender & LGBTQIA Center, and the Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity Education. 


Elon Core Forum #2
Mark D. Gearan, director of the Institute of Politics (IOP) at Harvard Kennedy School, “The influence of power and resistence in historical and contemporary interactions”

Themes: advocacy, civic engagement, politics and society

Tuesday, October 2

Great Hall of Global Commons, 8 a.m. and 2:20 p.m.


Cathy Hubbs, “What Makes Us Vulnerable to Data Breaches?”

Thursday, October 4
McKinnon Hall, Moseley Center, 4 p.m.

Cathy Hubbs, Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) at American University, will be a featured speaker as part of National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM). Her talk will focus on the human behavior side of cyber security data breaches and our role in the age of the Internet of Things (IoT).  What makes us vulnerable?  How do attackers use the art of persuasion to manipulate us to gain access to our computers and networks?

Cathy Hubbs works in the Office of Information Technology at American University, identifying risk sources, planning, developing, implementing and maintaining the University’s information technology security program to safeguard new and existing technologies and services.  She contributes to university-wide information security awareness and education programs and is responsible for the development of information security policies, procedures and security standards. Sponsored by Elon University Office of Information Technology


CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, film screening and conversation

Thursday, October 4
McKinnon Hall, Moseley Center, 5:30 p.m.

A provocative documentary film by Robin Hauser Reynolds exposes the shortage of American female and minority software engineers and explores the reasons for this gender gap. Following the screening, attendees are invited to stay for a conversation as we explore both the challenges faced today with diversity and how we can solve them. Cathy Hubbs, Chief Information Security Officer at American University, will facilitate this discussion. Sponsored by Elon University Office of Information Technology


Biko Mandela Gray

Thursday, October 4
Yeager Recital Hall, 7 p.m.

Ferris E. Reynolds Lecture in Philosophy

Biko Mandela Gray, Assistant Professor of Religion at Syracuse University, works at the nexus and interplay between continental philosophy of religion and theories and methods in African American thought. His research is primarily on the connection between race, subjectivity, religion, and embodiment, exploring how these four categories play on one another in the concrete space of human experience. He also is interested in the religious implications of social justice movements. He is currently working on a book project that explores how contemporary racial justice movements, like Blacklivesmatter, demonstrate new ways of theorizing the connection between embodiment, religion, and subjectivity. Sponsored by the Elon Philosophy Department


Dmitri Shteinberg, piano

Thursday, October 4
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Elon University Lyceum Series

Dmitri Shteinberg is a Russian-born artist who began his musical training in Moscow. When his family moved to Israel, he continued training and received his degree in piano performance from Tel-Aviv University Academy of Music. He received his Doctoral degree from the Manhattan School of Music in New York. Equally adept as a recitalist and as a collaborative pianist, Dr. Shteinberg has performed extensively worldwide and is recorded on the Fleur de Son Classics label. Currently he teaches piano at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and is recognized as one of North Carolina’s most renowned piano artists.


Department of Performing Arts presents “School for Wives” – a comedy by Molière

Thursday – Tuesday, October 4-9
Roberts Studio Theatre, Scott Studios at Arts West. Performances each day at 7:30 p.m. and also 2 p.m. matinees, Saturday and Sunday

Directed by Kevin Otos

Desiring marriage but deeply afraid of infidelity, Arnolphe has devised a cunning scheme to keep his young fiancé and longtime ward Agnes faithful to him: keep her in total ignorance of the world. In this acclaimed comedy by Molière, Arnolphe’s paranoia and controlling nature soon backfire as Agnes discovers Horace. Can young love overcome Arnolphe’s oppressive scheme? This rhyming French comedy presented with an all-female cast answer with hilarious results. Admission: $15 or Elon ID. Reservations are highly recommended and will be offered beginning September 27 at elonperformingarts.com or the Roberts Studio Reservation Line at (336) 278-5650.


IV Hispanic Film Series: The Future Perfect (El futuro perfecto)

Friday, October 5
LaRose Digital Theatre, Koury Business Center, 5:30 p.m.

NELE WOHLATZ / ARGENTINA / 2016 / 65 MIN
Spanish and Mandarin with English subtitles

Awarded Best First Feature at the Locarno International Film Festival, German-Argentinian newcomer Nele Wohlatz’s The Future Perfect explores fractured relationships within culture, tradition, and language in this whimsical romantic comedy.

Xiaobin is 17 years old and does not speak a single word of Spanish when she arrives in Argentina. But a few days later, she already has a new name, Beatriz, and a job in a Chinese supermarket. Her family lives in a parallel world in a launderette, far removed from the Argentinians. Xiaobin secretly saves money and enrolls at a language school. She tries out in the street what she learns there. After having learned how to “make appointments,” she arranges to meet a supermarket customer, Vijay. He comes from India, and although they can barely communicate with each other, they start a secret romance. And when she practices the condicional, the form of possibility, Xiaobin starts thinking about the future. What would happen if her parents learned about Vijay? The more she masters the Spanish language, the more she interferes in the scenario. Sponsored by the Department of World Languages and Cultures /Latin American Studies/ Peace and Conflict Studies/ Sigma Delta Pi/ El Centro / Pragda / Spain-USA Foundation / Secretary of State for Culture of Spain


Tectonic Plates: Alamance County’s Science Café: Native Plants for Birds and Butterflies

Tuesday, October 9
Fat Frogg Bar and Grill, Elon, 7 p.m.

Learn cutting edge science in a relaxed informal atmosphere without all the technical jargon. Programs held on the second Tuesday of each month (September through December). In October, Lynn Moseley, Guilford College (emerita) will discuss Native Plants for Birds and Butterflies. Information is available at https://www.facebook.com/TectonicPlatesScienceCafe


Eduardo Corral, poetry reading

Wednesday, October 17
Johnston Hall, 7 p.m.

Poet Eduardo Corral, winner of the Yale Younger Poetry Award and a faculty member in NC State’s MFA Creative Writing program, will read from his alluring, wild poetry. Sponsored by The English Department


Elon University Fall Convocation and
Inauguration of President Connie Ledoux Book

Thursday, October 18
Schar Center, 3 p.m.

The inauguration of Elon’s ninth president, Connie Ledoux Book, will serve as the university’s Fall Convocation ceremony. Book, who began her service as president on March 1, will offer an inaugural address during the formal ceremony in Elon’s new Schar Center. Admission: Free, no ticket required. 


Instant Laughter

Friday & Saturday, October 19-20
Yeager Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m. both nights

Directed by Fredrick J. Rubeck

Instant Laughter features several performing arts majors working with spontaneous suggestions from the audience to create games and humorous scenes before your eyes. Admission: $15 at the door. All proceeds benefit Elon’s theatre arts program.


Sara Prigodich and Hanna Vogel

Monday, October 22
Gallery 406, Arts West, artist talk, 5:30 p.m.

This exhibition consists of craft-based sculptural work by two artists, Sara Allen Prigodich and Hanna Vogel. Multi-media sculptures and installations use the meanings inherent in the materials to explore emotional and physical dualities. Sara works with porcelain and wood and Hanna works with woven steel wire and handmade paper. Sara’s work examines the mutability of memory and its effects on our emotional states. Hanna’s work explores the balance between growth and decay in order to cultivate compassion for the physical work around us and for our own ephemeral bodies.

Both Sara Allen Prigodich and Hanna Vogel received their MFAs at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. Their public talk will offer context to this two-person mixed media, site-specific installation. Exhibition continues through December 7.


Francis Edward Su, “Mathematics for Human Flourishing”

Monday, October 22
McKinnon Hall, Moseley Center, 7 p.m.

Francis Edward Su is the Beneditktsson-Karwa Professor of Mathematics at Harvey Mudd College, and past president of the Mathematical Association of America. He researches geometric combinatorics and applications to the social sciences, and he has received multiple National Science Foundation research grants for his work. He also has a passion for teaching and popularizing mathematics. He received the 2001 Hesse Prize for expository writing from the Mathematical Association of America and the 2013 Haimo Award for distinguished teaching. His book, “Mathematics for Human Flourishing,” will be published by Yale University Press in 2019.


Talking Black in America, film screening and Q&A with Producers

Tuesday, October 23
Turner Theatre, 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m. with entertainment by student groups)

Talking Black in America is a new documentary about the history and circumstances of African American speech. It is part of the Language and Life Project at NC State (https://www.talkingblackinamerica.org/). The film is directed and produced by Neal Hutcheson and Danica Cullinan, and linguist Walt Wolfram is the executive producer.

Talking Black in America follows the unique circumstances of the descendants of American slaves and their incredible impact on American life and language. Speech varieties from the African American community reflect the imprint of African language systems, the influences of regional British and Southern American dialects, and the creativity and resilience of people living through oppression, segregation and the fight for equality. Filmed across the United States, Talking Black in America is a startling revelation of language as legacy, identity and triumph over adversity. With Reverend Jeremiah Wright, DJ Nabs, Professor Griff, Quest M.C.O.D.Y., Dahlia the Poet, Nicky Sunshine and many others. Sponsored by the Global Neighborhood and The English Department


Sand Mandala

Wednesday – Friday, October 24-26
Sacred Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, ongoing viewing

Tibetan Buddhist monks will construct a sand mandala for healing and peace during a period of three days.  Viewers are encouraged to frequently stop by and see its progress.  An opening ceremony will begin the process at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, and a closing ceremony will begin at 3 p.m. on Friday in which the mandala is deconstructed and the sand is shared with the community and the earth. Sponsored by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life


Helen Fisher, “The Neuroscience of Innovation”

Wednesday, October 24
Whitley Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Liberal Arts Forum Lecture

Neuroscientist and biological anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher is a pioneer in the biology of human personality and the neurochemistry of leadership. Her groundbreaking research has shown how understanding the biology behind personality styles can be used to build teams and corporate boards, advertise, innovate, and succeed at work. The Chief Scientific Advisor for Match.com, Dr. Fisher has developed The Fisher Temperament Inventory. Taken by more than 14 million people in 40 countries, the Inventory is the first and only personality questionnaire built from and validated by neuroscience (using fMRI brain scanning). Her discovery of the four basic biological styles of thinking and behaving – Explorer, Builder, Director and Negotiator – represents the biggest leap in personality tools in the past 100 years.

Dr. Fisher is the co-founder and chief science officer of NeuroColor, a revolutionary business consulting and training firm. Her work reveals how to recognize and influence each personality style, increasing the effectiveness of teams and improving our understanding of how individuals collaborate, resolve conflict, sell, innovate and lead.

Along with her concept of the four thinking styles, Fisher’s research from NeuroColor has been profiled in Harvard Business Review’s 2017 March-April issue, The New Science of Teamwork, The Wall Street Journal, and in the 2017 book, The Leading Brain: Powerful Science-Based Strategies for Achieving Peak Performance by Hans W. Hageman and Friederike Fabritus.

She is the author of five bestselling books on the neuroscience behind human social behavior, including Why Him? Why Her? and the 1994 classic Anatomy of Love, Which was released in a second edition in February 2016.


IV Hispanic Film Series: Tempest (Tempestad)

Thursday, October 25
LaRose Digital Theatre (KOBC), 5:30 p.m.

TATIANA HUEZO / MEXICO / 2016 / 105 MIN
Spanish with English subtitles

A poignant doc by celebrated filmmaker Tatiana Huezo, Tempest narrates the parallel journey of two women. Mirror-like, it reflects the impact of the violence and impunity that afflict Mexico. Through their voices, we are drawn into the heart of their feelings, steeped in loss and pain, but also love, dignity, and resistance.

On a normal day on her way to work, Miriam is arrested on suspicion of human trafficking. While the government reports that a criminal gang has been rounded up, in reality a group of innocent Mexicans has fallen victim to the vagaries of a corrupt system. After her detention, she is handed over to a private prison controlled by the Organized Crime, where she is forced to pay a monthly fee to remain alive.

Adela works as a clown in a traveling circus. Ten years ago, her life was irreversibly transformed; every night during the show, she evokes her missing daughter, Monica.

Tempest has screened at more than 60 film festivals worldwide, collecting awards in Berlin, Lima, Havana, Madrid, Cork, and many others.

Sponsored by the Department of World Languages and Cultures /Latin American Studies/ Peace and Conflict Studies/ Sigma Delta Pi/ El Centro / Pragda / Spain-USA Foundation / Secretary of State for Culture of Spain


John Biewen,  “Seeing White”, a podcast

Thursday, October 25
Isabella Cannon Room, 7 p.m.

Just what is going on with white people? Police shootings of unarmed African Americans; acts of domestic terrorism by white supremacists; the renewed embrace of raw, undisguised white-identity politics; unending racial inequity in schools, housing, criminal justice, and hiring. Some of this feels new, but in truth it’s an old story. Why? Where did the notion of “whiteness” come from? What does it mean? What is whiteness for?

Duke University-based podcast producer John Biewen took a deep dive into these questions through his series on the Scene on Radio podcast, “Seeing White.” His talk will feature clips from the series outlining the invention and construction of race as we know it, and exploring the fundamental mistakes we make in thinking about racism — what it is and how it works in the world. Sponsored by the Elon Philosophy Department


Department of Performing Arts presents
“SWEENEY TODD: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street – A Musical Thriller!”

Thursday-Saturday, October 25-27
McCrary Theatre, all performances at 7:30 p.m.

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler
Directed by Catherine McNeela, Choreographed by Linda Sabo, Music Direction by Valerie Maze

Winner of eight Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Best Book, and Best Score, Sweeney Todd is a haunting, heart-stopping tale of culinary crime and chilling, dark humor.  The story follows Benjamin Barker, a broken barber whose life and family were stolen from him when a cunning, corrupt Judge Turpin wrongfully imprisoned him. Recently returned to London and looking to exact a bloody revenge, Sweeney Todd (Benjamin Barker) forges a cutthroat alliance with the lonely and enterprising Mrs. Lovett and her unsavory pies. Admission: $15 or Elon ID. Tickets available October 4 at the Center for the Arts Box Office. For information, call (336) 278-5610.


Elon Core Forum #3
“The impact of globalization in an increasingly connected, technological and rapidly changing world”

Themes: Refugees, human trafficking, immigration

Wednesday, October 31

LaRose Digital Theatre, KOBC 101, 9:25 a.m. and 12:15 p.m.

Co-sponsored by Study USA
9:25 a.m.Sana Haq -Syrian refugees
12:15 p.m.Carmen Monico – Displacement of (Un)Accompanied Minors from Central American Northern Triangle (CANT) Nations: Forced Family Separation as Child Abduction & Human Trafficking in the U.S. 


Diwali Celebration

Wednesday, October 31
McBride Gathering Space, Numen Lumen Pavilion, 6 p.m.

The Hindu festival of lights commemorates the triumph of light over darkness and good over evil.  Experience Elon’s celebration of the spiritual holiday through traditional food and dance as well as songs and stories from students, faculty, staff, and community members. Sponsored by the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life


Elon University Percussion Ensemble Fall Concert

Wednesday, October 31
Yeager Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Join the Percussion Ensemble for their exciting fall program, featuring the music of contemporary composers. Directed by Mariana Poole, the program includes a variety of musical styles played on both traditional and “found object” instruments. You never know what will happen next! Sponsored by the Department of Music