Biology Courses

2014-15 Undergraduate Academic Catalog

BIO 101. TOPICS IN GENERAL BIOLOGY  3 sh
This topical approach to the foundational concepts of biology examines theories and issues in biology as they relate to varying special topics selected by the instructor. To satisfy the Core Curriculum laboratory science requirement, BIO 102 should be taken concurrently. No credit to students with prior credit for BIO 111. No credit toward biology major or minor. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 102. GENERAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY  1 sh
This two-hour laboratory provides experiences to complement selected foundational concepts from BIO 101. To satisfy the Core Curriculum laboratory science requirement, BIO 101 and 102 should be taken concurrently. No credit to students with prior credit for BIO 113. No credit toward biology major or minor. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 103.  REINVENTING LIFE 4 sh
Can humans responsibly direct evolution? Reinventing Life explores how human activities are rapidly changing life and what this means for the future. Basic concepts are linked with the cutting-edge science of environmental manipulations, stem cells, genetic engineering, synthetic biology and bioethics. Laboratory included. No credit toward biology major or minor. Satisfies Core Curriculum laboratory science requirement. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 105. CURRENT ISSUES IN BIOLOGY  4 sh
Designed for nonscience majors, this course focuses on reading, interpreting and evaluating facts behind biological issues and exploring the implications for science and human society. Students conduct library research, present oral reports, discuss and write papers on these issues. No credit toward biology major or minor. Satisfies General Studies nonlaboratory science requirement. Offered winter.
 
BIO 106.  BIOLOGY: THE SCIENCE OF LIFE   4 sh
The goal of this course for the non-science major is to promote biological literacy and a working knowledge of biological concepts gained through laboratory work, group collaboration and class discussion. Laboratory experience will be integrated with concurrent lecture activities. Course topics will include the nature of science, biodiversity, genes and genetics, evolution and human impacts on the biosphere. No credit toward the biology major or minor. Satisfies the Core Curriculum laboratory requirement.
 
BIO 111. INTRODUCTORY CELL BIOLOGY  3 sh
In this introduction to organization and function at the cellular level, topics of study include basic cell chemistry and structure, transport, energetics and reproduction. Required for biology majors/minors. Corequisite: BIO 113. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 113. CELL BIOLOGY LABORATORY  1 sh
Students have three hours of laboratory experience per week with topics complementing concurrent study in BIO 111. Required for biology majors/minors. Corequisite: BIO 111. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 131. BIODIVERSITY 4 sh
This course is an integrated lab/lecture, which will teach students lab and field techniques to measure and understand the diversity of the living world. Concepts include the measurement of biodiversity, the evolutionary relationships among organisms and the construction of phylogenies. Required for biology majors. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 212. INTRODUCTORY POPULATION BIOLOGY  3 sh
Topics of study in this introduction to organization and function at the population level include reproduction and transmission genetics, patterns and mechanics of evolutionary change and basic concepts of ecology. This course is required for biology majors. Corequisite: BIO 212, Biology majors also need to take BIO 261 concurrently. Prerequisites: Bio Majors: BIO 111,113, 131; all other majors, sophomore standing with faculty approval. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 214. POPULATION BIOLOGY LABORATORY  1 sh
Students have three hours of laboratory experience per week with topics complementing concurrent study in BIO 112. This course is required for biology majors. Corequisite: BIO 212, Biology majors also need to take BIO 261 concurrently. Prerequisites: Bio Majors: BIO 111,113, 131; all other majors, sophomore standing with faculty approval.  Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 215.  DIVERSITY OF LIFE 4 sh
This course examines the basic concepts of biological form and function based on evolutionary relationships and diversity. Students investigate the natural history of local species and their role in community dynamics. Laboratory experiences emphasize field investigations, including sampling techniques, species identification and data analysis. Satisfies the General Studies lab science requirement. This course can be used for the environmental studies major well as a minor in biology. No credit toward the biology major. Prerequisites: ENS 111/113 or BIO 212/214. (BIO 215 is cross-listed with ENS 215 and is equivalent to BIO 131 as prerequisite for upper level BIO courses). Offered spring.
 
BIO 245.  PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS  3 sh
Students learn basic concepts and laboratory techniques used in classic and modern genetics. Topics covered include transmission, molecular and population genetic principles and their implications in the modern world. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Required for biology majors. Prerequisites: BIO 111,113 and sophomore standing. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 246. GENETICS LABORATORY 1 sh
Students have three hours of laboratory experience with topics complementing concurrent study in BIO 245. Required for biology majors. Corequisite: BIO 245. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 253. GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS  4 sh
In a general survey of microorganisms, study emphasizes bacteria, their cytophysiological characteristics and classification, viruses, microbial diseases and immunity, and the role of microorganisms in human affairs. Designed for nonmajors who will be pursuing health-related career paths. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 111, 113. Junior standing or consent of instructor. Offered spring of even-numbered years.
 
BIO 254. PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY  3 sh
This is a one-semester course that focuses on the major themes of biochemistry within a biological context. There will be special emphasis on protein structure/function, enzyme kinetics and on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. To facilitate an in-depth understanding of these fundamental principles, we will explore specific cases where abnormal biochemical processes result in disease. Prerequisites: BIO 111/113, CHM 112. Corequisite: BIO 255.
 
BIO 255. PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY  1 sh
Basic quantitative and analytical biochemical techniques will be utilized. There will be a special emphasis on protein biochemistry and enzyme analysis. Prerequisites: BIO 111/113. CHM 112. Corequisite: BIO 254.
 
BIO 261.  INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR 2 sh
Students learn to use primary information sources and gain practice in manual and computer information retrieval, read and interpret research and review papers, write abstracts and present scientific information orally. Corequisite: For biology majors, BIO 212. Offered fall and spring.
 
BIO 262.  EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN  2 sh
This seminar course will examine experimental designs commonly used by biological and environmental scientists. Through discussion of scientific papers drawn from the published literature, the participants in this seminar class will learn how to design laboratory and field experiments that discern statistically significant effects in a time- and energy-efficient manner. Emphasis will be placed on developing a strong conceptual understanding of the advantages and limitations of various experimental designs and statistical analysis tools. Some of the topics to be covered include pseudoreplication, random sampling, quasi-experiments, factorial experiments, split-plot designs, block designs and the role of ethics in research. Prerequisites: BIO 131 and MTH 110 OR MTH 220.
 

BIO 263. HUMAN ANATOMY  4 sh
This course builds a basic foundation in regional human anatomy. Lectures emphasize macroscopic and some microscopic studies of the human body. Special emphasis will be placed on musculoskeletal and neuromuscular anatomy. Laboratory involves progressive anatomical dissections of human cadavers, use of human anatomy instructional software and examination of osteological models. Three class hours, 1 laboratory per week. Offered fall and spring.

BIO 264. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY  4 sh
This study of human physiology emphasizes skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, heart, blood, respiratory, digestive and urinary aspects. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. No credit toward biology major or minor. Offered fall and spring.

BIO 271. SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR  2-4 sh
Study focuses on one biological topic per seminar in this nonlaboratory discussion course for biology majors. Topics are determined by student and faculty interest. Must have instructor’s consent. Offered winter.
 
BIO 315.  ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY  4 sh
Animal Physiology will compare and contrast the basic physiological systems (nervous, cardiac, muscular, endocrine, respiratory and reproductive) in many of the vertebrates. Basics will be emphasized, but differences between species and extreme environmental conditions (temperature, salinity, humidity) will be examined. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 131.
 
BIO 316. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY  4 sh
This course examines the changes that occur at the cellular and subcellular level as a single-cell zygote develops into a multi-cellular organism. Topics include fertilization, blastula formation, gastrulation and organogenesis. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 131; CHM 111, 112. Offered spring of even-numbered years.
 
BIO 318. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION  4 sh
This course is an evolutionary approach to the form and function of vertebrates. Students will investigate a diversity of traits and follow the evolutionary changes of these traits from the earliest vertebrates to mammals. The primary focus is on the move from aquatic to terrestrial habitats, the evolution of flight and the evolution of endothermy. Students will compare changes in form and function of the major organ systems through laboratory dissection of the jawless fish, shark, amphibian and mammal. Prerequisites: BIO 212, 214, 121. Offered fall of even-numbered years.
 
BIO 319.  COMPARATIVE AND FUNCTIONAL NEUROBIOLOGY  4 sh
This course sets forth a conceptual framework for understanding comparative and functional vertebrate neurobiology. The course will help students build a strong foundation in evolutionary biological anatom and development of the vertebrate brain and nervous system. Course content will emphasize comparative structural integrity, functional and basic clinical concepts (normal versus abnormal) related to neuroanatomical control of vertebrates/ Finally, this course intends 
 
BIO 321. MICROBIOLOGY  4 sh
In a general survey of microorganisms, study emphasizes bacteria, their cytophysiological characteristics and classification, viruses, microbial diseases and immunity, and the role of microorganisms in human affairs. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 111, 113; CHM 111, 112, 113, 114 or CHM 115/116. Junior standing or consent of instructor. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.
 
BIO 324.  TOXICOLOGY  4 sh
This course will survey the principles of toxicology pertaining to human health and risk assessment. Using case studies, current scientific literature, data analysis and discussion, we will examine the three main categories of descriptive, mechanistic and regulatory toxicology. Fundamental concepts – such as dose, route, site, duration and frequency of exposure; absorption; distribution; excretion; chemical interactions; metabolism; and dose response – will be introduced. Building on that foundation, students will investigate methods used to assess carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and teratogenesis. Four class hours per week. Prerequisite: BIO 131 or 245.
 
BIO 325. HUMAN HISTOLOGY  4 sh
Students survey human body tissues (especially of the cardiovascular, alimentary, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems), stressing tissue identification and the relationship of microanatomy to physiology of the human body. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 111/113. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.
 
BIO 327.  IMMUNOLOGY  4 sh
Students in this seminar course will learn: 1) the fundamentals of immunology, 2) understand the roles of the various immune cells, 3) apply their understanding to various diseases associated with inappropriate immune responses, and 4) learn how the experiments contributed to the understanding of the immune system. This course will be taught by the Problem Based Learning method, which promotes student engagement and learning. Additionally, students are expected to read current research papers, participate in discussions, write a review paper and give a presentation. Four class hours per week. Prerequisite: BIO 245 or BIO 422 or by permission of the instructor.
 
BIO 328.  BIOCHEMICAL BASIS OF DISEASE  4 sh
The focus of this course is to integrate biochemical concepts with normal human function and investigate diseases that can result from abnormal biochemistry. Each major class of macromolecules (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids) and major metabolic pathways will be introduced by a disease resulting from their dysfunction. By understanding the molecular basis of the disease, the student will gain a fundamental understanding of the underlying biochemistry. This course will  utilize a variety of learning techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 245.
 
BIO 331. THE BIOLOGY OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 4 sh
This course examines why animals behave the way they do. Specific topics include the
causation, development, function and evolution of behavior in wild and captive animals. Three class hours and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 112, 114 and 231 or consent of instructor.
 
BIO 332. ZOOLOGY 4 sh
Students survey the animal kingdom (emphasizing selected vertebrates and invertebrates) investigating basic concepts of morphology, anatomy, physiology and taxonomy as they affect the ecology of the animal. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 131.
 
BIO 333.  MICROBIAL ECOLOGY  4 sh
This course focuses on the ecology and evolution of microbes with an emphasis on bacteria, fungi and viruses. As new molecular technology drives our understanding of these microscopic organisms, the diversity and prominence of these microbes, how they interact with their surroundings and the important roles that they play are becoming clearer. The lecture portion of the course includes student discussion of primary literature. The lab portion of the course is centered on molecular and culture-based analysis of environmental samples. Three class hours and one laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 131 and BIO 245.
 
BIO 334. HERPETOLOGY  4 sh
This course explores the ecology, conservation and evolution of reptiles and amphibians. Amphibians (frogs and salamanders) represent the direct descendents of the first vertebrates to successfully make the leap to terrestrial life. Reptiles (turtles, lizards and snakes) have successfully occupied nearly every niche on earth at one time or another. Together these groups make up a major proportion of the vertebrates currently living today. In this course we will investigate the unique feeding, reproduction, environmental and life history adaptations found in these ecologically important organisms. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. The laboratory will include both field and lab experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 131.
 
BIO 335. FIELD BIOLOGY  4 sh
In this field-oriented course, restricted to selected natural taxa, environments or biological phenomena, in-depth field study may include identification, classification, life histories and relationships among organisms. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered winter and/or summer.
 
BIO 341. BOTANY 4 sh
This survey of the plant kingdom (emphasizing vascular plants) includes general morphology, anatomy, physiology of metabolism and growth, economic importance and identification . Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 131. Offered fall.
 
BIO 342.  AQUATIC BIOLOGY: THE STUDY OF INLAND WATERS  4 sh
Aquatic Biology considers the chemical, physical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems including streams, rivers, ponds and lakes. Topics include the geomorphology of inland waters, thermal stratification, nutrient cycles, community metabolism, plankton community dynamics, seasonal succession and eutrophication resulting from human activities. Weekly laboratory meetings provide hands-on experience with the field techniques of freshwater scientists. Prerequisites: BIO 131 or ENS 215.
 
BIO 343. CLINICAL ANATOMY  4 sh
This course uses the regional approach to build a strong foundation in human anatomy. Lectures emphasize structure, basic clinical concepts and some functional and mechanical relationships at the gross anatomical level. Laboratory includes dissection of human cadavers, use of human anatomy instructional software, examination of osteological models and applications of basic radiology. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 231 and 245. Offered fall. 
 
BIO 344. EVOLUTION  4 sh
In this course, students investigate the causes, rates and implications of evolutionary change in biological systems. Evolution by natural selection is the unifying theory of biology linking phenomena that occur at many different levels of biological organization. Thus, natural selection is studied in depth. Other topics include speciation, rates of molecular change, causes of mass extinctions and sexual selection. Three lecture hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 212, 214 and 245. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.
 
BIO 346. WETLANDS ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT 4 sh
This course will present the biological, chemical and physical properties of wetland ecosystems in North America. Topics will include hydrology, biogeochemistry, biological adaptations, ecology and functional aspects of wetlands. Principles behind wetland classification, delineation and management will also be introduced. This class will maintain a strong field component involving field techniques, monitoring and evaluation of wetlands. At least two weekend field trips, involving rigorous scientific inquiry will be required. Prerequisites: BIO 231 or ENS 215 or permission of Instructor. (BIO 346 is cross-listed with ENS 346).
 
BIO 347.  DENDROLOGY  4 sh
Dendrology will provide an introduction to the trees and other woody plants that are native to or commonly found in the southeastern United States. Lecture will involve an overview of plant taxonomy, nomenclature and diagnostic characteristics of trees seen in lab. In addition, lecture will cover the ecology and economic and cultural significance of trees. The purpose of lab is to identify trees in the field and, except in extraordinary circumstances, lab will be outside at locations both on and off-campus. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 131 or ENS 215.
 
BIO 348. BIOTECHNOLOGY  4 sh
Students explore how biological systems are utilized in scientific research. In collaboration with their peers, students will apply the techniques of molecular biology (restriction digestion, transformation, DNA hybridization, PCR, etc.) to investigate a research question. Emphasis will be placed on protocol design, solution preparation and critical analysis of research data. Additionally, the social context of biotechnology will be investigated as students explore the risks and rewards in this expanding field. Two laboratory periods, two class hours per week. Prerequisite: BIO 245.
 
BIO 350.  GENERAL ECOLOGY  4 sh
Students explore ecological principles at population, community and ecosystem levels in this study of the interrelationships of organisms with their biotic and abiotic environments. Three lecture hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites for biology major: BIO 231. Prerequisites for environmental studies major: BIO 212, 214, 215.
 
BIO 361.  INTRODUCTION TO CANCER BIOLOGY  2 sh
For the past three decades, the understanding of how cancer disease occurs and how it can be managed has become possible through basic research on cellular processes and with the application of molecular biology. Through the knowledge gained from research, effective therapies and prevention against cancer are being advanced and developed. In this seminar course, the six main characteristics attributed to cancer, several processes of cell biology specific to cancer, different types of cancer and treatments will be introduced and discussed. Students are expected to research and read current primary literature, participate and lead in daily discussions, write a review paper and present their topics. Prerequisites: BIO 245 and BIO 261.
 
BIO 371. SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR  2-4 sh
Each seminar – a nonlaboratory discussion course for biology majors – focuses on one biological topic determined by faculty interest. Offered winter.
 
BIO 422.  MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY  4 sh
This course is a study of the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells at the molecular level. It examines in depth specific biochemical pathways and processes essential to life. Topics include considerable coverage of the principles, techniques and applications of molecular biology. Four class hours. Prerequisites: BIO 245; CHM 211, 212, 213, 214. Offered spring of even-numbered years.
 
BIO 442.  PLANT PHYSIOLOGY  4 sh
Topics in this study of the life processes of plants include photosynthesis, mineral nutrients, movement of materials, plant growth substances and senescence. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 231; CHM 211, 212, 213, 214 or permission. Offered spring of odd-numbered years.
 
BIO 445.  TOPICS IN ADVANCED GENETICS  4 sh
This course will engage students in the study of advanced research and techniques in genetics. The theme of the course will change with instructors but will include the applications of advanced concepts in transmission, molecular and population genetics to problem solving in the modern world. Three class hours, one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 245 and junior standing. 
 
BIO 462. SENIOR SEMINAR  2 sh
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct both individual and group literature research projects of their own choosing based on recently published scientific papers. Students participate in group discussions of the current literature, research and write a scientific review paper, and develop a formal oral presentation. Recommended for senior year. Offered fall.
 
BIO 471. SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR  2-4 sh
Each seminar — a nonlaboratory discussion course for biology majors — focuses on one biological topic determined by student and faculty interest. Must have instructor’s consent.
 
BIO 481. INTERNSHIP IN BIOLOGY  1-4 sh
Advanced-level work experience in a biological field is offered on an individual basis when suitable opportunities can be arranged. Prerequisite: permission of department.
 
BIO 499. RESEARCH  1-4 sh
Students from all levels conduct laboratory and/or field research under the direction of the biology faculty. Maximum eight semester hours total credit. Prerequisite: permission of department.
 
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This page was updated June 26, 2014.