Turkey’s Erdogan: leadership style and foreign policy audiences,” is published in Turkish Studies, an international, peer-reviewed journal.

 

 

" /> Turkey’s Erdogan: leadership style and foreign policy audiences,” is published in Turkish Studies, an international, peer-reviewed journal.

 

 

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Kesgin’s research considers political leaders’ audiences and foreign policy

Baris Kesgin’s recent publication looks into how political leaders attend to different audiences in their foreign policy statements. Kesgin’s paper “Turkey’s Erdogan: leadership style and foreign policy audiences,” is published in Turkish Studies, an international, peer-reviewed journal.    

Baris Kesgin, assistant professor of political science and associate coordinator of the International & Global Studies Program, recently published an article in Turkish Studies, an international, peer-reviewed journal. 

Baris Kesgin, assistant professor of political science
In his article, titled "Turkey's Erdogan: leadership style and foreign policy audiences, Kesgin surveys Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s personality traits and his leadership style from 2003 until 2013. Kesgin’s analyses are based on Erdogan’s interviews with the Turkish and international media on foreign policy issues.

Accordingly, the paper presents multiple profiles of Erdogan. First, looking at Erdogan’s traits and style in the interviews with the Turkish and international media outlets, Kesgin finds that Erdogan’s traits and style differ between these two audiences. Then, Kesgin provides more profiles of the Turkish leader distinguishing the international media further to American, European, and Middle Eastern. Erdogan exhibits noticeable differences here as well; most importantly, Kesgin finds Erdogan’s interviews with American news outlets indicate changes in his traits.

This paper aims at reaching to various fields of inquiry, among others political personality, foreign policy analysis, Turkish studies, as well as Middle East studies. According to Kesgin, the findings of the paper seeks to reignite a conversation about leaders and foreign policy audiences.

 

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