Noyce Scholars Program Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What do I do if I am first-year student interested in the Elon Noyce Scholars Program?

A: Apply for a Noyce Internship. Internships will provide you an opportunity to explore working in education in a STEM field. If you can fit it into your schedule, take SOC 243: Sociology of Education. The course can partially fulfill your "Society" requirement, and is a requirement if you do eventually decide to pursue teacher licensure. The course will allow you to further explore a major in education, and includes a field placement in a local school.

Q: What do I do if I am a sophomore interested in the Elon Noyce Scholars Program?

A: Apply for a Noyce Internship and a Noyce Scholarship. Internships will provide you an opportunity to explore working in education in a STEM field. Scholarships provide $43,800 of funding for your Junior and Senior year at Elon. Sign up for SOC 243: Sociology of Education, as soon as possible. The course can partially fulfill your "Society" requirement, and is a requirement if you decide to pursue teacher licensure. The course will allow you to further delve into education, and includes a field placement in a local school.

Q: What requirements must candidates meet in order to be considered for the Elon Noyce Scholars Program?

A: Scholarship and stipend recipients will be selected on the basis of academic merit, with consideration for financial need and diversity. Scholarship recipients must meet the requirements for entry to the Elon Teacher Education programs. Eligibility criteria for the Noyce Scholars program is consistent with the National Science Foundation specifications:

  • US citizens, nationals, or permanent resident aliens;
  • majoring in mathematics or a science discipline and in the last two years of a baccalaureate degree program; and
  • internship recipients must be first- or second-year students who through their coursework and a letter of recommendation have demonstrated an interest in STEM fields.

Q: What do I do if I am a sophomore and I'm worried that I may not be able to graduate in four years if I try to complete the teacher education program?

A: Noyce Scholarships are designed to cover four semesters of study, normally comprised of the Junior and Senior year. If you are concerned about graduating in four years given the courses required, arrange to meet with Jeff Carpenter to discuss a planned sequence of courses. If it would be necessary to stay an extra semester, or take some summer classes, the size of the Noyce Scholarship may make this extra study worthwhile.

Q: What requirements must I complete in order to maintain my scholarship for a second year?

A: Scholars must maintain the minimum GPA as required by their major, make adequate progress towards degree completion, and maintain satisfactory disposition ratings.

Q: Can Noyce scholarship money be used for room, board, or incidental expenses?

A: No. Noyce scholarship money can only be applied to tuition expenses.

Q: What is a high-need district/school?

A: The National Science Foundation defines "high-need" school districts on the basis of the following criteria: 1) student participation in free or reduced priced lunch programs, 2) level of teacher preparation, and 3) teacher attrition rates. To be identified as a "high need" school, the school must meet at least one of these criteria. Many school districts in North Carolina and other states do qualify. 

Q: Does the Noyce program assign me to a job?

A: No. Scholarship recipients conduct a job search and consult with the Elon Noyce Scholars Program to determine which school districts that are of interest qualify as high-need. 

Q: Who is Robert Noyce?

A: Robert Noyce (1927-1990) was a co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor (1957) and Intel (1968). He invented the integrated circuit or silicon microchip, which revolutionized the computer industry and gave Silicon Valley its name.

Noyce Intern at work with Elon Academy students.