Thursday, August 24, 2017

For a new or replacement University Directory Photograph, visit University Communications. They are located in the Truitt building on South Campus, at the corner of Antioch Avenue and East Trollinger Avenue, during the times below. No appointment is necessary.

Thursday, August 24: 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.; 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

Click "Description" to find out more about the event. Click "Add Event" to include the event on your Outlook calendar. Please note that before you add the event to your calendar be sure your Outlook is open.

8:30 a.m.-9:45 a.m.

Faculty Research Presentations (two sessions: 8:30 a.m.-9:00 a.m. and 9:15 a.m.-9:45 a.m.)

Lindner 204 and 208

Description

Session 1

Session 2

9:45 a.m.-10:15 a.m.

FR&D Session on Funding Opportunities

Lindner 204

Description

10:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m.

College Coffee

Phi Beta Kappa Plaza (Rain location: Koury Concourse)

Description

10:45 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Undergraduate Research Interest Group

Lindner 204

Description

11:30 a.m-12:15 p.m.

Institutional Review Board Basics and Q&A

Lindner 208

Description

1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

Department Meetings

Various Locations

Description

3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
Maker Hub - Downtown Tour

Maker Hub, Downtown - Third Floor Elon Town Center

Description


Faculty Research Presentations (two sessions: 8:30 a.m.-9:00 a.m. and 9:15 a.m.-9:45 a.m.)

Lindner 204 and 208

Faculty who have previously received funding from the Faculty Research and Development Committee present results of their scholarship to colleagues.

8:30 a.m.-9:00 a.m.

 
Room 204

Kirstin Ringelberg

"How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Flower Paintings”

Painter Madeleine Lemaire (1845-1928), dubbed “The Empress of Roses” by Robert de Montesquiou, created environments both physical and psychic whose chief symbolic form was floral. Today, this emphasis on flowers seems saccharine, and the association of Lemaire with it is generally used as a way to dismiss her work and her historical importance. In addition to revealing the anti-feminine drift of scholarship more broadly, this dismissal ignores the value placed on Lemaire’s botanical abilities at the time—represented most clearly by her appointment as the first female-identified Professor of design at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle. This presentation will address the heterotopic possibilities of Lemaire’s painted, printed, and actual gardens as spaces of non-normative identification and engagement, rather than as spaces of superficial feminine (and effeminate) vapidity.

Room 208

Buffie Longmire-Avital

“We may be Black but we are human too”: Exploring how Black American mothers talk to their daughters about coping with racial discrimination and microaggressions.

The suggestions that mothers give and model for their children in regard to responding and coping with stressful life experiences is predictive of the types of coping styles the children will use when faced with heightened stress. However, this emerging research has yet to explore the influence of maternal coping socialization on chronic stress that is linked to a person’s sociodemographic position (e.g., race). Preliminary findings from a mixed method study of 54 Black mothers of emerging adult women found that religious and spiritual engagement was highly indicative of the mothers’ coping style. Many of the mothers warned their daughters that while the experience of discrimination is ongoing, “every event cannot rise to the highest level.”

9:15 a.m.-9:45 a.m.

 
Room 204

Greg Haenel

"Hot lizards and cold mitochondria: remembrance of hybridizations past"

During the last major period of climate change 18000 years ago, the continental glaciers melted and warmer weather spread from the equator toward the poles. The deserts of the southwestern US also expanded northward into their current locations at this time. As the deserts grew, so too did the ranges of the many species that were adapted to the hotter conditions, including the long-tailed brush lizard (Urosaurus graciosus). When the U. graciosus lizards moved north, they began to hybridize with the resident populations of Tree lizards (U. ornatus), a closely related species that thrives in more moderate temperatures. Remnants of this past hybridization are apparent in the presence of “non-heat adapted” U. ornatus-type mitochondria in some U. graciosus individuals (hybrids). Mitochondria are responsible for producing most of the energy in cells and we found that the mitochondria of the hybrids function differently than the mitochondria of either separate species. Because the production of energy in the cells requires proteins coded by nuclear genes to interact with proteins coded by the mitochondria, hybrids with the “wrong” type of mitochondria may be at a disadvantage. This year I began to use the tools of genomics (RNAseq) to test hypotheses about gene expression in these hybrid lizards that have the “wrong” type of mitochondria. By comparing gene expression profiles of lizards held at low and high temperatures, I can determine which genes are turned on or off at the different temperatures. Identifying and learning about these hybrids’ differentially expressed genes may reveal how evolution can affect metabolic pathways, provide insights into how mitochondria in other species respond to stress, and support the role of mitochondrial incompatibilities in the process of speciation.

Room 208

Katy Rouse

The Effects of Child Care Regulations on Price of Care and Staff Wages: New Evidence from the National Survey of Early Care and Education

Given the significance of high quality early education, state governments have imposed regulations on childcare markets to ensure establishments are of sufficient quality. Government intervention into the child care market is motivated by the idea that absent such intervention, quality of care would be sub-optimal due to uncertainty arising from asymmetric information. If regulations are binding and well-enforced, the imposition of tighter regulations should increase quality of care, however, compliance with regulations is expensive and may have unintended consequences. Centers may respond to tighter regulations by increasing their prices. This potential effect of regulation is at odds with the use of federal subsidies and child care tax credits intended to make childcare more cost-effective. Centers may also respond to tighter regulations by reducing staff wages, a consequence that could lead to a lower quality teaching pool. In this research, we empirically test these possibilities using data from the National Survey of Early Child Education. We examine the effects of two age-group based regulations: maximum child-to-staff ratios and group sizes. Our preliminary results suggest that more stringent regulations have no discernable impact on the price of care, but do have a small negative impact on staff wages.

Intended Audience: Open to all members of Elon University.

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FR&D Session on Funding Opportunities (9:45 a.m.-10:15 a.m.)

Lindner 204

The Faculty Research and Development Committee allocates funds for: 1) Sabbaticals, 2) Summer Fellowships, 3) Release Time Fellowships, 4) Research, Development and Advanced Study, and 5) Hultquist Awards for new faculty. Attend this session to learn about these options, the online application process, and eligibility. Members of the FR&D Committee will be present to answer your questions.

Intended Audience: Program designed for full-time faculty members.

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College Coffee (10:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m.)

Phi Beta Kappa Plaza (Rain location: Koury Concourse)

Elon’s weekly tradition of community gathering begins with this year’s first College Coffee. In the spirit of being a part of a collegial community the Employee Resource Groups will be present to introduce themselves and answer questions about their missions and resources, so please stop by and introduce yourself! College Coffee continues throughout the school year on Tuesday mornings from 9:40 a.m.-10:10 a.m. Show your support for sustainability and bring your own cup. 

Intended Audience: Open to all members of Elon University.

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Undergraduate Research Interest Group (10:45 a.m.-11:30 a.m.)

Lindner 204

Faculty members interested in mentoring undergraduates in research will meet to discuss programs supported by the Undergraduate Research Program and best practices on initiating and maintaining research efforts with undergraduates. Members of the Undergraduate Research Program Advisory Committee and the program’s Director will discuss the year’s activities and solicit ideas for enhancements to the program. New offerings will be announced as well. In addition, editorial staff members from Elon’s undergraduate research journal, Perspectives on Undergraduate Research and Mentoring, will be in attendance to discuss the journal and recruit editorial board members. This session is appropriate for all interested persons regardless of experience in mentoring undergraduate research.

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Institutional Review Board Basics and Q&A (11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.)

Lindner 208

The Institutional Review Board reviews all research proposals involving human participants. If you or your students will conduct research in 2017-18 that will involve human participation, you should attend this session to clarify the procedures you will need to follow.

Intended Audience: Open to all members of Elon University.

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Department Meetings (1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. unless noted)

Varies - see below

Faculty will meet with other members of their department. When known, department meeting rooms are listed below. For other departments, consult the department chair or program assistant for the location of the department meeting.

Department

Meeting Location

 Fall Department Chair

Accounting (See LSB listing on Friday) Linda Poulson
Art and Art HistoryArts West 126 Michael Fels
Biology McMichael 226   Antonio Izzo
ChemistryMcMichael 331 Karl Sienerth
CommunicationsMcEwen 013 Jessica Gisclair
Computing SciencesLong 200 Joel Hollingsworth
Economics (See LSB listing on Friday) Steve DeLoach
Education and WellnessMooney 111 Marna Winter
EnglishBelk Pavilion (AVTL) 208 Jean Schwind
Environmental StudiesMcMichael 003G  Janet MacFall
Exercise ScienceKoury Athletic Center, Atkins Room  Caroline Ketcham
Finance (See LSB listing on Friday) Wonhi Synn
History and GeographyLindner 110 Rodney Clare
Human Service Studies Psychology and Human Services Studies Building 125J  Bud Warner
Love School of BusinessKoury Business Center, LaRose Digital Theatre Raghu Tadepalli, Dean
Management & Entrepreneurship (See LSB listing on Friday) Amy Allen
Marketing & International Business (See LSB listing on Friday) Coleman Rich
Mathematics & StatisticsDuke 203 Crista Arangala
MusicIsabella Cannon Room, Center for the Arts and Terrace (until 6:30) Tom Erdmann
Performing Arts Belk Library 206 Fred Rubeck
PhilosophySpence Pavilion (AVRP) 108 Stephen Bloch-Schulman
PhysicsMcMichael 207 Martin Kamela
Political Science/Policy StudiesGray Pavilion (AVPS) 200 Sean Giovanello
PsychologyPsychology and Human Services Studies Building 136 Alan Scott
Public Health Studies  Psychology and Human Services Studies Building 109 Cynthia Fair 
Religious StudiesSpence Pavilion 207 Jeff Pugh
Sociology & AnthropologyLindner 207 Rissa Trachman
Sport ManagementPowell 304 Tony Weaver
World Languages and Cultures Carlton 119 Sophie Adamson

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Maker Hub Tour (3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.)

Maker Hub, Downtown - Third Floor Elon Town Center

Elon’s newest maker space, Maker Hub – Downtown, gives campus makers access to advanced prototyping and fabrication tools including laser engravers, a large CNC router, 3D printers, and other tools not available elsewhere on campus. The space will open in mid-September, but you can check it out during planning week. Stop by to see the new space, equipment, and talk with instructional technologists and student staff about how you and your students can use the space. Enter the door on West College Avenue beside the teller machine (Elon Center for Design Thinking sign above). For more information, visit http://www.elon.edu/makerhub.

Intended Audience: Faculty and Staff

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