Sexual Exploitation

 Sexual Exploitation occurs when one person takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Invasion of sexual privacy
  •  Prostituting another person
  • Non-consensual digital, video or audio recording of nudity or sexual activity
  • Unauthorized sharing or distribution of digital, video or audio recording of nudity or sexual activity
  • Engaging in voyeurism
  • Knowingly exposing someone to or transmitting an STI, STD or HIV to another person
  •  Intentionally or recklessly exposing one’s genitals in non-consensual circumstances or inducing another to expose their genitals in non-consensual circumstances
  • Sexually-based stalking and/or bullying may also be forms of sexual exploitation

Elon University's Sexual Misconduct and Interpersonal Violence Policy, revised August 2017

Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment is unwelcome, sexual, sex-based and/or gender-based verbal, written, online and/or physical conduct.

Sexual harassment can take the form of quid pro quo harassment, retaliatory harassment and/or creates a hostile environment. 

A hostile environment is created when sexual harassment is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive, and objectively offensive that it unreasonably interferes with, denies, or limits someone’s ability to participate in, or benefit from, the University’s educational and/or employment, social and/or residential program.

The determination of whether an environment is “hostile” must be based on the totality of the circumstances. These circumstances include, but are not limited to, the following:
i. The frequency of the conduct
ii. The nature and severity of the conduct
iii. Whether the conduct was physically threatening
iv. Whether the conduct was humiliating
v. The effect of the conduct on the alleged victim’s mental or emotional state
vi. Whether the conduct was directed at more than one person
vii. Whether the conduct arose in the context of other discriminatory conduct
viii. Whether the conduct unreasonably interfered with the reporting party’s educational or work performance
Quid Pro Quo Harassment is unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature by a person having power or authority over another or when submission to such sexual conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of rating or evaluating an individual’s educational or employment progress, development, or performance. This includes when submission to such conduct would be a condition for access to receiving the benefits of any educational or employment program.
 

Elon University's Sexual Misconduct and Interpersonal Violence Policy, revised August 2017

Stalking

Stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person on the basis of actual or perceived membership in a protected class that is unwelcome, and would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. Stalking can also be repetitive and menacing conduct, purposely or knowingly causing emotional distress, or pursuing, following, harassing, and/or interfering with the peace and/or the safety of another. 

Elon University's Sexual Misconduct and Interpersonal Violence Policy, revised August 2017

Stalking behaviors include, but are not limited to:

  • Contacting you excessively (phone, texts, Facebook, email, etc), especially if you have asked the person to stop
  • Sending you unwanted gifts/cards/letters
  • Following you or showing up unexpectedly
  • Damaging your property
  • Threatening your family, friends, or pets
  • Threatening you with physical harm
  • Trying to publicly humiliate you with information (true or false)
  • Following you on social media sites to keep up with your activities

If you believe you are being exploited, harassed or stalked and are in danger, call 911 for immediate response.   If you are not in immediate danger, contact the Coordinator for Violence Response at 336-278-5009 or through email for confidential support and advocacy.