English Catalog Courses

2014-15 Undergraduate Academic Catalog

First Year Writing Courses | Introductory Language Courses | Introductory Writing Courses | Introductory Literature Courses | Language Studies Courses | Advanced Writing Courses | Historical Studies Courses | Cultural Studies Courses | Author Studies Courses | Genre Studies Courses | Special Studies Courses | Internships & Research | Senior Seminars | Children's and Young Adult Literature Courses | Study Abroad Courses


FIRST YEAR WRITING COURSES

ENG 100. SUPPLEMENTAL WRITING WORKSHOP  4 sh
This writing workshop focuses on invention, organization, drafting, revision and editing strategies. Its curriculum is tailored to support the work done in ENG 110 so that the student has the best possible chance for success in College Writing. Concurrent enrollment in English 110 required. Elective credit only. Offered fall.

ENG 110. WRITING: ARGUMENT AND INQUIRY 4 sh
This first-year course emphasizing invention, peer response, revising and editing, students learn to develop and make assertions, support them with appropriate evidence and present them in public form. Students also learn that the style and content of their writing will affect their success in influencing audiences. A grade of “C-” or better required for graduation. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 115. ONE ON ONE WRITING 4 sh
Students work with the professor to create an individual plan for improving writing skills. The class is open to students at all levels but does not satisfy General Studies requirements or replace ENG 110. By permission of instructor and ENG 110 coordinator. Offered winter. 

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INTRODUCTORY LANGUAGE COURSES

ENG 200. CRITICAL CONVERSATIONS IN LITERARY STUDIES 4 sh
This course develops the research and writing skills that are essential for producing informed, independent and original literary criticism. Students will learn not only how to evaluate and synthesize the arguments of published critics and theorists, but also how to enter and extend critical arguments or conversations about selected works of literature by advancing interpretations and theories of their own. This course can satisfy either a writing OR a literature requirement within the English major.

ENG 204. LANGUAGE IN SOCIETY    4 sh
This course will introduce students to the discipline of sociolinguistics, the various ways that language is used and misused in society, and will serve as a good introduction to the idea that language and culture are inextricable. Some of the many topics to be explored are the influences of language in the following areas: thought, gender, ethnicity, age, politics, advertising, religion, education, social class and the media.

ENG 205. GRAMMAR 4 sh
This study of the English language includes the evolution of prescriptive and descriptive grammars, terminology, parts of speech and function, grammatical structures and correct usage of standard written English. Offered spring.

ENG 206. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES 4 sh
This course will provide an introduction to second language acquisition and the theory and practice of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL). Readings, class discussions and projects will focus on pedagogy and assessment in reading, writing, listening and speaking for ESL students. Offered fall of even years.

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INTRODUCTORY WRITING COURSES

ENG 211. STYLE AND EDITING 4 sh
This course explores theories and processes of editing in professional writing and discusses the profession of editing: what it is that professional editors do, what it takes to become an effective editor, what the editorial process looks like (from acquisitions editing to indexing) and the effects of technology. Students will explore sectors in which editors might find themselves working and will learn about and practice substantive editing, stylistic editing, copy editing and proofreading. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 212. MULTIMEDIA RHETORICS  4 sh
This course provides students with the theoretical and practical background necessary to approach the design of interfaces from a user’s perspective and as a reflective practice. The students will also develop a rhetorical foundation for analyzing and producing primarily screen-based interfaces. The course emphasizes a process-orientated approach to design wherein design includes rigorous and disciplined attention to planning, research, revision and production. Moreover, students learn to focus on design from a rhetorical perspective, one that balances writers’ goals, users’/readers’ needs and text design possibilities. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered spring. 

ENG 213. INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING 4 sh
For this workshop, students interested in writing poems and short stories may be assigned additional texts for discussion of technique or form. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 214. CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY READING/WRITING 4 sh
Along with readings of 20th century British, Irish and American poetry, students from all levels spend equal amounts of time discussing their own and others’ poems. Study also includes reading quizzes, writing journals and poetry assignments. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 215. INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL WRITING AND RHETORIC 4 sh
This course is designed to introduce students to the study and practice of professional writing from the perspective of rhetoric, one of the oldest liberal arts. Students will learn about the wide range of possibilities connected to the broad term “professional writing,” understand what assuming a rhetorical perspective on writing means, gain a broad sense of the issues, topics and practices that mark the field of professional writing and rhetoric, become part of the ongoing conversations that make up the field, understand professional writing and rhetoric as a socially situated art and practice, gain some practical, hands-on experience through a variety of professional writing projects and integrate scholastic research into reflective professional practice. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 217. WRITING TECHNOLOGIES  4 sh
This course is designed to provide all liberal arts students with an introduction to and familiarity with the writing software packages that are commonly considered the primary tools of communication in the professional world. We will both critique these tools, their strengths and limitations, as well as gain facility with their use through hands-on practice. Programs covered include advanced world processing tools; social media platforms; and image manipulation, web design and page layout software, including Adobe Creative Suite.

ENG 219. WRITING STUDIES SURVEY 4 sh
This course examines theories of composition and literacy and explores the implications for our understanding of writing’s impact on our personal, public and professional lives. Students will study topics such as writing pedagogy (writing as a process, peer response, editing, revision, response and assessment); the relationship between writing and literacy; writing and testing; writing and electronic texts; various technologies’ effect on the production and style of writing; and the political, social and cultural politics of writing. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall of odd years.

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INTRODUCTORY LITERATURE COURSES

ENG 221. BRITISH LITERATURE I 4 sh
This study of British literature in its social and cultural contexts emphasizes the close reading of texts from the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval and Renaissance periods through the Enlightenment. Satisfies departmental pre-1800 requirement. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 222. BRITISH LITERATURE II 4 sh
This study of British literature in its social and cultural contexts — from the Romantic, Victorian and Modernist periods through the present — emphasizes the close reading of texts representing the diversity of modern British literary expression. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 223. AMERICAN LITERATURE I 4 sh
This study of American literature in its social and cultural contexts — from Colonial and Revolutionary periods through the Romantic period — emphasizes the close reading of texts to examine American literary culture from its origins to the post-Civil War era. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 224. AMERICAN LITERATURE II 4 sh
This study of American literature in its social and cultural contexts — from the post-Civil War era, Progressive and Modernist periods up to the present — involves close reading of selected texts to stress the expansion of the American literary canon. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 231. INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURE 4 sh
This course provides an introduction to the study of selected works from European, Asian, African and Latin American literatures (in English translation) with emphasis on literary traditions and genres. Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement. Offered spring of alternate years.

ENG 232. LITERATURE OF EAST ASIA 4 sh
This historical-cultural course will examine late 19th to mid-20th century texts — novels, poems, short stories, and theatre — of China and Japan and how these representative works reflect the cultural transformations unique to these Far Eastern countries. Satisfies the global/multicultural requirement. Offered fall or spring of alternate years.

ENG 234. HISTORICAL ASIAN LITERATURE AND FILM 4 sh
This interdisciplinary course explores significant works of Chinese, Japanese and Korean historical fiction that center on a period in the past, ranging from the Three Kingdoms period (220 CE) to the early 20th century. It uses this fiction and the historical contexts that inform it as foundations for the interrogation of Chinese, Japanese and Korean film, television series and other visual culture. Students combine literary study, historiography and visual analysis to interrogate themes, including gender and power, transnational conflict and consensus, and personal and national loyalty. Counts toward the global/multicultural requirement. Offered fall or spring of alternate years.

ENG 236. AFRICAN-AMERICAN MUSICAL AND LITERARY TRADITIONS 4 sh
This asynchronous, online course is designed to introduce students to the artistic impact of American historical events and movements, such as slavery, Jim Crow, segregation, the Great Migration, and Black Nationalism on the joint development of African-American musical and literary traditions. Beginning with slave songs and the Negro spirituals, and moving through gospel, the Blues, Jazz and Hip Hop, students explore the ways in which these musical genres influenced African-American literary production. The course has no pre-requisite.

ENG 237. CARIBBEAN LITERATURE 4 sh
Through the study of the fiction, poetry, film, drama and non-fiction of select Caribbean writers, this literary survey of the Caribbean examines the impact of historical, cultural, political, and social contexts, movements, and events on Caribbean societies and peoples. Offered spring of odd years.

ENG 238. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1945 4 sh
This course traces the development of the themes of protest, accommodation and escapism found in the fiction, poetry and drama of African-American writers before 1945. Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement. Offered fall of alternate years.

ENG 239. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1945 4 sh
An examination of works by major African-American writers since 1945 focuses on making connections between writers. Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered spring of alternate years.

ENG 248. ASIAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE  4 sh
This course examines representative texts in Asian-American literature, introducing students to the competing forces of ethnic identity, hybridity, generational conflict and assimilation in novels, short stories and poetry by Asian-Americans who are contemplating their identities in America. Studies will begin with 19th Century immigrant literature and continue with literary works, cultural criticism and historic legal developments that reflect the Asian experience in America. Race, gender, interactions with other minority groups and a universe of stereotypes complicate the process acculturation and acquiring the various elements of what we call the American Dream are examined. This course satisfies global/multicultural requirement. Offered fall or spring of alternate years.

ENG 250. INTERPRETATIONS OF LITERATURE 4 sh
This course employs different critical approaches to interpret and evaluate poetry, drama and fiction from a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 251. ENGLISH STUDIES IN BRITAIN 4 sh
A study-tour based in London emphasizes the theatre and places of literary and cultural importance. The course includes excursions to such places as Stratford-upon-Avon, Stonehenge and Canterbury. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum literature requirement. Winter Term only.

ENG 255. TOPICS IN LITERATURE 4 sh
Courses taught under this number will introduce students to the study of several different genres of literature. The reading selections will explore a theme such as Urban Life, Family, the Holocaust, Spiritual Life, Cultures in Contact, Business and Literature. The course is especially recommended for students who are not English majors. It fulfills the Core Curriculum literature requirement. May be repeated to replace a failing grade. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 259. LITERATURE OF THE HOLOCAUST 4 sh
This course will explore a variety of literature with the Holocaust as its central theme. Genres of literature will include short and long fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and film. The Holocaust will be explored through the historical, spiritual, cultural and literary viewpoints of first and second generation survivors, witnesses, deniers and perpetrators. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum Literature requirement. 

ENG 260. LITERATURE AND THE LAW 4 sh
This course provides an interdisciplinary study of the complicated relationship between the operating law and representations and evaluations of the legal process and ideas of justice in literature and literary theory. Selected readings from Antiquity through the contemporary era will probe questions of what is just, compare literature about justice coming from Western and non-Western perspectives, consider critiques of literature from lawyers and judges, explore utopian and dystopian visions of the law, and examine the relationship between interpretations of literary and legal texts. Offered fall or spring of alternate years.

ENG 266. LITERATURE OF TERROR & SUPERNATURAL 4 sh
A study of the elements of terror and the supernatural in selected literary works that are designed to inspire fear. Representative authors include Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry James and Stephen King. Extensive use of videos. Offered in winter. 

ENG 281. CUPID STUDIO 4 sh
Students will implement writing, publishing and multimedia projects for themselves and local clients. This workshop-style course provides intensive practice in rhetorical strategies, audience assessment, research about writing, editing, publishing, visual rhetoric and design and project management. Repeatable up to eight hours; students may count four hours toward their PWR electives. Prerequisite: ENG 110. No credit toward Core Curriculum requirement.

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LANGUAGE STUDIES COURSES
This selection of courses centers on studies in the structure and historical development of the English language and in the theory of rhetoric and composition.

ENG 301. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS 4 sh
An overview of the study of language, its nature, diversity, and structure, this course introduces students to the core subfields of applied and descriptive linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Through direct engagement with data from a wide range of the world’s languages, students gain experience in describing linguistic structures through examining many different language systems. The course also serves as an overview to how language is used in society with regard to its use socially and geographically. Prerequisite: sophomore standing, but
first-year students may enroll with consent of the instructor. Offered fall of even years.
 

ENG 302. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 4 sh
English has undergone dramatic and exciting alterations throughout its life. This course examines the changes in sounds, grammar, meaning and vocabulary of English from its Indo-European roots and original appearance in the Old English period to the modern differences between British and American English, as well as how English is used around the world and its now global status. To understand these changes and why they occur, we will look for explanations in both the structure and usage of the language and in the social history of its speakers. Changes will be illustrated through textual analysis of language change between 450 AD to the 21st century, study of social and regional dialects in America and discussion of language standards. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, but first year students may enroll with consent of instructor. Offered fall of even years. 

ENG 304. UNDERSTANDING RHETORIC 4 sh
Rhetoric has been long understood as crucial to the development of effective citizens and leaders for democratic life and is the foundation for all professional writing activities in any context. This course surveys important rhetoric texts in their socio-historical contexts to synthesize definitions of rhetoric, cull valuable rhetorical analysis, strategies and identify practical strategies and heuristics for communicating effectively in professional situations. Students' understanding of rhetoric will be expanded and deepened through academic scholarship, practical assignments and professionally-oriented, project-based work. Offered fall and spring. 
 

ENG 305. AMERICAN ENGLISH 4 sh
This course examines the development of American English from the 16th-century influences of Jamestown and Massachusetts settlers to Creoles developing along the Mexican border and in Florida. Study includes regional and social varieties of English, phonetics and literature that employs dialects.

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ADVANCED WRITING COURSES

Courses in this group are specifically designed to provide practice in different kinds of writing beyond the introductory level.

ENG 310. INTERNATIONAL RHETORICS 4 sh
This course examines how professional writing and rhetoric are affected by the cultural and social expectations of international communities. In addition to investigating and comparing examples of the discourse expectations for texts produced in several international contexts, the course will explore the growing use of English as a language of international business and politics and will examine the language’s impact on the rhetorical situations in which it is used. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 311. PUBLISHING  4 sh
This course is designed as an extended, hands-on exploration of collaborative writing and its relationship to professional writing. Students read, think and write about the theories and practices of collaborative learning and writing, while studying how those theories relate to the roles we assume as professional writers. Students will develop an understanding of collaborative writing as a complex social, political and rhetorical act; and will strive to articulate a careful consideration of the ethical responsibilities collaborative writing must acknowledge and negotiate. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 312. VISUAL RHETORICS  4 sh
This course introduces students to the specialized study and practice of visual rhetoric and document design. Emphasizing the rhetorical nature of visuals and design, the course draws attention to the thinking, processes and skills that are part of design, with specific attention to the design of various documents professional writers encounter. Students will be introduced to a variety of theories and design approaches. In addition to studying this content, they will have opportunities to apply and reflect on what they have learned. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 313. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING AND RHETORIC  4 sh
Special topics courses within the professional writing and rhetoric concentration offer students a deeper study of theory and practice as well as further opportunities to develop themselves as rhetors.  Possible topics include Advanced Interactive Design, Citizen Rhetor, Advanced Composition and Argument, Writing for Non-Profits.  May be taken more than once for credit, but may be applied to the English major only once.  Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 315. INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING: NONFICTION 4 sh
In this writing workshop, students develop a specific aspect of writing ability (e.g., voice, stylistics) or practice a particular type of writing (e.g., essay, biography, travel writing). Focus changes each semester. Offered spring. 

ENG 316. INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY 4 sh
This workshop, centered around students’ poems, also includes study of 20th century poetry (occasionally earlier) to learn poetic techniques and to recognize the many possibilities of poetic forms, subjects and voices. Prerequisite: ENG 110 and ENG 213 or permission of instructor. Offered fall.

ENG 317. INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION 4 sh
This workshop, centered around students’ stories, also includes study of 20th century fiction (occasionally earlier) to learn techniques and to recognize possibilities for point of view, characterization, structure and diction. Prerequisite: ENG 110 and ENG 213 or permission of instructor.  Offered fall and spring.

ENG 318. WRITING SCIENCE  4 sh
This course examines the complex nature and practice of scientific and technical discourse. Although open to anyone with an interest in this topic, the course is designed especially for students majoring in the sciences who want to improve the professional writing skills necessary for successful careers in their chosen fields and students majoring in writing or communications who wish to pursue careers as technical and scientific communicators. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 319. WRITING CENTER WORKSHOP 4 sh
The Writing Center Workshop enhances students’ writing ability while they learn to tutor writing. Students are required to tutor four hours each week in Elon’s Writing Center. Strong writing abilities and interpersonal skills recommended. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall and spring.

ENG 397. WRITING AS INQUIRY 4 sh
This course is designed to introduce students to research methods employed by practicing writers and to emphasize that writing as a rhetorical practice always involves active inquiry.  In addition to surveying writerly research methods, students will gain hands-on experience with a variety of methods.  In the context of specific assignments and projects, students will learn how to choose, sequence and adapt forms of inquiry to specific rhetorical situations, enhancing their artfulness as writers and professional rhetors.  Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 413. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING 4 sh
Students in this workshop course will combine their reading of fiction, nonfiction and poetry with the production of their own new texts. This is specifically designed for the writing and revision of pieces suitable for publication and manuscripts appropriate for application to graduate writing programs. This class will be extremely rigorous while preserving the supportive and constructive atmosphere of the writing workshop. May be taken more than once for credit, but may be applied to the English major only once.  Prerequisites: ENG 110, 213, and at least one upper-level creative writing course (ENG 315-317).

ENG 414. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING 4 sh
Special topics courses within the creative writing concentration offer students further opportunities to develop themselves as writers. Possible topics include Poetic Forms: History, Theory and Practice; Teaching Creative Writing in the Community; Flash Fiction; The Short-Short Story; and Hybrid Genres: The Confluence of Poetry, Fiction and Nonfiction.  May be taken more than once for credit, but may be applied to the English major only once.   Prerequisite: ENG 110, 213.

ENG 415. ADVANCED CUPID STUDIO 4 sh
Building on the writing, publishing and project management begun in ENG 282, students in this course will further apply their rhetorical and writing strategies as CUPID associates, running CUPID-sponsored programs and writing projects, assisting other students with projects and software questions during lab open hours, and working on specialized individual projects with extensive faculty mentorship. Repeatable up to four hours by invitation of the instructor only. Prerequisites: ENG 110 and ENG 282. 

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HISTORICAL STUDIES COURSES
Courses in this group explore literature in historical, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural contexts.

ENG 321. CLASSICAL LITERATURE 4 sh
This study of ancient Greek and Roman literature and culture includes authors such as Homer, Plato, Sophocles, Ovid and Virgil, with readings from mythology, the great epics of the Trojan War, drama, philosophy and lyric poetry in modern translations. Satisfies departmental pre-1800 requirement and the departmental global/multicultural requirement.  Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered fall of alternate years.

ENG 322. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 4 sh
This study of literature and culture of the European Middle Ages includes authors such as Dante, Chretien de Troyes, Chaucer and Malory, with readings from modern translations of epics such as Beowulf or The Song of Roland, poetry about love or religious experience such as The Divine Comedy or narratives about adventure and chivalry, such as legends of King Arthur.  Satisfies departmental pre-1800 requirement.

ENG 323. RENAISSANCE LITERATURE 4 sh
This study of British and Continental literature and culture of the 16th and early 17th centuries includes authors such as Sidney, Marlowe, Montaigne, Shakespeare and Cervantes. Readings in Renaissance English from Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, sonnet sequences, lyric and narrative poems, and precursors of the modern novel, such as Don Quixote are covered.  Satisfies departmental pre-1800 requirement. 

ENG 324. ENLIGHTENMENT 4 sh
This study focuses on the great works of British, Continental and American literature during an age of reason and sensibility marked by industrial, scientific and political revolutions.  Satisfies departmental pre-1800 requirement. 

ENG 325. ROMANTICISM 4 sh
Romanticism provides an interdisciplinary study of British, American and Continental Romantic literature in the context of art, music (especially opera), cultural life and intellectual history.

ENG 326. REALISM AND THE LATER 19TH CENTURY 4 sh
This study involves an interdisciplinary look at British, American and Continental literary movements (realism, naturalism, symbolism and aestheticism), including reading selected masterworks in the context of the intellectual and cultural life of the period.

ENG 327. 17TH CENTURY LITERATURE 4 sh
This study of “The Century of Genius” includes works by British and Continental authors who ushered in the modern world.  Satisfies departmental pre-1800 requirement.

ENG 328. MODERNISM 4 sh
This interdisciplinary study of modernism as a dominant intellectual movement of the 20th century explores topics such as alienation, the artist’s role, the primitive, consciousness and the unconscious, human rights and the postmodern. The literature is supplemented by art, music and philosophical texts.

ENG 329. THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE 4 sh
This course examines the tremendous volume of literary, artistic, and cultural expression by African-Americans between WWI and approximately 1940 and will explore the evolution of American racial reasoning, Afro-orientalism and class conflict. Based in New York but felt internationally, the Harlem Renaissance is roundly viewed as a period of literary and cultural rebirth for African-Americans and of emerging black modernism. Readings may include W.E.B. DuBois, James
Weldon Johnson, Jessie Fauset, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, Countee Cullen, Marcus Garvey, Arthur Schomburg, Alain Locke, Zora Neale Hurston, George Schuyler, Sterling Brown, Wallace Thurman, Helene Johnson and others. Satisfies global/multicultural requirement. Offered fall or spring alternate years.

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CULTURAL STUDIES COURSES

Courses in this group emphasize the study of literature in its cultural context, often from the perspective of a particular social group. Regional, gender, ethnic and class issues are all possible concentrations.

ENG 330. APPALACHIAN LITERATURE 4 sh
A survey of 19th and 20th century Appalachian poetry, short and long fiction, drama, music, film and culture.

ENG 331. ADVANCED WORLD LITERATURE 4 sh
Advanced study of selected works of European, Asian, African and Latin American literatures (in English translation), from historical and cultural critical perspectives. Offered fall of alternate years. Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement. 

ENG 332. LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH 4 sh
Emphasis is given to major 20th century writers in this study of Southern literature, its background and themes. 

ENG 333. WOMEN IN LITERATURE: FEMINIST APPROACHES 4 sh
Women In Literature studies modern and traditional works of literature interpreted or reinterpreted from the perspective of feminist literary theories.

ENG 334. NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE 4 sh
In an introduction to American Indian literature from the 18th century through the present, study includes special emphasis on contemporary writers of the Native American Renaissance. Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement. 

ENG 335. LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE 4 sh
This course looks at recent Latin American literature mainly through the lens of history and politics, but economics, geography, music, art, and religion will also be taken into consideration. Course content will be in the form of poems, short and long fiction, non-fiction and film. Taught in English translation. Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement.
 

ENG 336. PARIS AND THE EXPATRIATES 4 sh
This course explores the culture and remarkable inhabitants of 1920s Paris. It examined the varied nationalities of selected expatriates, why Paris attracted them and how it enriched them. Central figures of study include creative writers, performers, painters, photographers, essayists and entrepreneurs. 

ENG 337. ASIAN LITERATURE OF SOCIAL CHANGE 4 sh
This course explores revolutionary democratic movements outside of the American tradition by studying 20th century Asian poetry, fiction and films, primarily of China and India. Offered irregularly. Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement. 

ENG 338. THE AFRICAN EXPERIENCE IN LITERATURE 4 sh
This course studies the literature of a variety of African countries in relation to Africa’s cultural traditions and its transition to modernity. Genres may include fiction, plays, poems, autobiographies and oral literature. Offered spring of alternate years. Satisfies the departmental/multicultural requirement. 

ENG 339. AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS 4 sh
A study of the major American environmental and natural history writers with close attention to issues of environmental ethics, anesthetics of nature and cultural attitudes towards the environment. The authors studied are Thoreau, Muir, Leopold, Carson, Abbey, Lopez, Wilson and Snyder. The course will emphasize the growing ethical and aesthetic appreciation of nature in American culture and how the insights of environmental writers can be used to address the environmental crisis. Offered spring of alternate years. 

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AUTHOR STUDIES COURSES
Courses in this group focus on the works of individual authors who have captured and continue to hold the imaginations of readers. Typical offerings include Yeats, Heaney, Poe, Hardy, Dickinson, Cather and those listed below.

ENG 341. CHAUCER 4 sh
A close study of Chaucer’s major works in the context of their medieval, intellectual and cultural background includes the greater portion of The Canterbury Tales, the dream visions, and "Troilus and Cressida." Satisfies the departmental pre-1800 requirement. 

ENG 342. SHAKESPEARE 4 sh
Courses taught under this number examine the life and representative works of Shakespeare in the context of English culture of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Typical offerings are “Shakespeare: Works” (selections from each of his genres), “Shakespeare: Tragedies” or “Shakespeare: Comedies.” Students may receive credit for more than one Shakespeare course in this category if the title is different. Satisfies the departmental pre-1800 requirement.

ENG 343. HEMINGWAY 4 sh
This course is a study of the Hemingway canon, including posthumous literature, published from the early 1920s to 2000. Emphasis will center on his various genres, where and how biography applies to interpretation of his work, his use of international locale and his artistic legacy.

ENG 344. ROBERT FROST 4 sh
This study of Frost’s early development as a lyric poet focuses on the close reading of his poetry, criticism and masques in the context of New England regionalism and the emergence of Modernism in American letters.

ENG 345. JANE AUSTEN 4 sh
Background study of 18th- and 19th-century England and the development of the novel are part of this examination of the life and writings of Austen. 

ENG 348. MARK TWAIN 4 sh
This course studies the life and work of Mark Twain as an American humorist, realist and social critic. Readings include "Roughing It," "Innocents Abroad," "The Gilded Age," "Life on the Mississippi," "Huckleberry Finn" and "Pudd’nhead Wilson," as well as selected shorter works and later writings. 

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GENRE STUDIES COURSES

These courses offer studies in specific types of literature such as poetry, drama, the novel, the essay and the short story.

ENG 351. THE NOVEL 4 sh
Focus and content vary in this course, which examines representative novels from different countries and ages. Typical emphases include the American, the British, the picaresque, the political novels and the Bildungsroman. This course sometimes carries an emphasis on gender. 

ENG 352. DRAMA 4 sh
In a study of western drama from ancient Greece to the present, representative texts are examined in their historical and cultural contexts. 

ENG 353. POETRY 4 sh
This course examines how different types of poems work:  their structure and sound, metaphor and image, thought and passion.  We will study narrative and lyric poems by past and current writers and explore the influence of history and culture in shaping their work.  Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 354. THE SHORT STORY 4 sh
This study of the short story as a literary form spans from its origins and development by Poe, Chekhov and others to experimental contemporary writers. Typically, five or six collections by writers from a variety of cultures are read.  

ENG 355. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GENRE STUDIES 4 sh
This course will offer specialized topics in genre and could include such topics as Laughter and Comedy, The Novel: British Women Writers, or Modern Poetry: British and American.  May be taken more than once for credit, but may be applied to the English major only once. 

ENG 356. NONFICTION 4 sh
Courses offered under this heading will usually focus on a specific subgenre of nonfiction, such as travel writing, nature writing, political writing, biography, memoir, new journalism, and the personal essay. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 357. THE LONDON THEATRE 4 sh
Students see productions of Shakespearean and other classic dramas and experience more modern and contemporary plays — both fringe and mainstream — in this study of drama in the London Theatre. Study abroad students only.

ENG 359. AFRICAN-AMERICAN NOVELS 4 sh
This study of novels by such writers as Baldwin, Ellison, Hurston, Walker, Wright and Morrison gives attention to gender, place, alienation and changes in forms of protest. This course satisfies the cultural studies requirement for English majors. Offered fall of alternating years.  Satisfies the departmental global/multicultural requirement. 

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SPECIAL TOPICS
Special Topics courses involve studies of various subjects, some of which fall outside the boundaries of traditional literary study.

ENG 361. GENDER ISSUES IN CINEMA 4 sh
This course explores how well film reveals gender differences between men and women. Time is spent studying gender stereotyping, the psychological accuracy of film’s representations of gender and gendered behavior of film directors. This course does not fulfill the Core Curriculum literature requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 362. FILM CRITICISM 4 sh
This course emphasizes how to interpret cinema critically, using films that illustrate cultural differences, periods, and types of filmmaking and achievements in techniques and ideas of the greatest directors. This course does not fulfill the Core Curriculum literature requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 363. TEACHING LITERATURE: CANONS, CULTURES AND CLASSROOMS 4 sh
This course explores literature from the viewpoint of the teacher – exploring a wide range of issues relevant to classrooms, including reading theory, critical theory, censorship and canonicity, and cultural, multicultural, interdisciplinary and multimodal approaches. Students will read  extensively in many genres of “classic” and “new canon” works, young adult and graphic novels, plays, poems and other texts, such as art, music and film. Although the primary focus of the course is secondary schools, it is useful for anyone interested in teaching at the middle grade or college levels, as well. Offered fall of alternating years.

ENG 365. LITERATURE AND THEOLOGY 4 sh
This course provides an interdisciplinary study focusing on relationships between literary and theological disciplines with special attention to literature illustrating various approaches to religious questions.

ENG 366. CONTEMPORARY WRITERS 4 sh
This course explores the contemporary movements in fiction, poetry and nonfiction with special attention to style and technique. This course will include significant reading as well as the production of original work. Assignments will be both creative and academic.  This course meets the Core Curriculum literature requirement and the core literature requirement for English majors. Prerequisites: ENG 110, ENG 213, or permission of instructor.

ENG 367. THE ARTHURIAN LEGEND 4 sh
Course study traces the development of stories of King Arthur and the Round Table from their appearance in the early Middle Ages through the present. Genres include chronicle, poetry, fiction and cinema. Prerequisite: ENG 110.

ENG 385. MIDDLE EASTERN LITERATURE 4 sh
This course looks mainly at recent Middle Eastern literature, treating it as we would any poem or novel or memoir, but, obviously, the region that produced this literature — its history, geography, politics, religion and economics — also will be taken into consideration. The class will focus on an area that includes between 13 and 24 countries (depending on one’s definition of the Middle East), with an emphasis on Israel/Palestine, Egypt, Sudan, Iran and Turkey. Possible topics include postcolonial theory, Orientalism, women in the Middle East, monotheism and its discontents and literature focused on place.

ENG 491. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 sh

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INTERNSHIPS

ENG 381. WRITING INTERNSHIP 1-4 sh
The Writing Internship is designed to give English majors from all concentrations practical experience in workplace settings potentially connected to future careers.  Specific requirements will vary, but will include readings, reflective writing assignments,a end creating a portfolio.  prerequisite:  ENG 110.  Offered fall, winter, spring.

ENG 382. TEACHING INTERNSHIP 4 sh
The student will attend a 100-200-level course and will work with the professor teaching this course to develop assignments, journal prompts, quiz and class discussions, as well as lead small group discussions. The student will also meet with the professor once a week to discuss strategies for planning the course, selection of texts, the structure of daily class sessions and the pedagogical techniques used in the course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 and English majors of at least sophomore standing. By permission of instructor and chair.

ENG 489. TEACHING AND LEARNING APPRENTICESHIP 4 sh
Teaching and Learning Apprentices work with a faculty mentor on a particular course. This experience is intended for exceptional students who wish to deepen their knowledge of the discipline, gain a better understanding of the professional academic life, engage in a meaningful mentoring relationship with a faculty mentor around issues related to teaching, enhance their interpersonal and communication skills and develop their leadership skills. The experience may be of particular value to students who wish to pursue a career in higher education or teaching in general. Requires satisfactory completion of all requirements listed on the registration form. 

  • Faculty members invite students to consider a 489 experience;
  • The TLA must have a)completed the course for which she/he will be a TLA with a grade of at least an A-, b) completed higher level relevant course work that prepares the student to be a TLA with a minimum grade of B+, or c) by permission of the department chair.
  • The TLA must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher;
  • The TLA must have junior or senior standing;
  • A registration form must be completed and submitted prior to the first day of class for which the student will serve as a TLA. The form will require a syllabus for 489, the course syllabus for which the student will serve as a TLA, and the signatures of the TLA, faculty mentor, the TLA's faculty advisor, the department chair/program director or coordinator and the Dean of Elon College.

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SENIOR SEMINARS, RESEARCH

ENG 495. SENIOR SEMINAR: LITERATURE 4 sh
This capstone seminar requires majors to integrate and extend their knowledge and practice of literary study. It emphasizes independent research, effectively presenting research in oral and written forms, and awareness of current debates in literary studies. Majors only or by permission of instructor. Offered fall.

ENG 496. SENIOR SEMINAR: CREATIVE WRITING 4 sh
The senior seminar in creative writing focuses on the students’ production of new work in fiction, poetry and/or nonfiction in a workshop environment. Emphasis is also placed on the active reading of contemporary authors. Prerequisite: ENG 110, 213. Majors only or by permission of instructor. Offered fall.

ENG 497. SENIOR SEMINAR: PROFESSIONAL WRITING AND RHETORIC  4 sh
This course is a capstone experience, giving students a chance to reflect on what they have learned and done within the concentration, to engage in the more focused and advanced study indicative of being a senior, and to begin looking ahead to and preparing for their futures.  Modeled after a graduate seminar, it allows students to conduct independent research in an area of their choice.  Prerequisite: ENG 110. Majors only or by permission of instructor. Offered spring.

ENG 499. RESEARCH IN ENGLISH  4 sh
This course offers students the opportunity to create an undergraduate original research project guided by a faculty mentor.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration.  Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

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CHILDREN'S AND YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE

ENG 399. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 4 sh
In this study of contemporary literature for young adult readers, students read texts appropriate to the adolescent, examine common themes, and apply critical approaches suitable for middle grades and secondary classrooms. Authors may include Judy Blume, Robert Cormier, S. E. Hinton, Madeleine L’Engle, Gary Paulsen, Katherine Patterson and Cynthia Voigt. Credit toward English teacher licensure. No credit toward English major/minor. Prerequisites: EDU 211, ENG 110.

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STUDY ABROAD COURSES

ENG 251. ENGLISH STUDIES IN BRITAIN 4 sh
A study-tour based in London emphasizes the theatre and places of literary and cultural importance. The course includes excursions to such places as Stratford-upon-Avon, Stonehenge and Canterbury. This course satisfies the General Studies literature requirement. Winter term only.

ENG 357. THE LONDON THEATRE 4 sh
Students see productions of Shakespearean and other classic dramas and experience more modern and contemporary plays — both fringe and mainstream — in this study of drama in The London Theatre. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Studies Abroad students only.�

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This page was updated June 27, 2014.