School of Education

Education Department Courses

Visit the Education Department homepage for more information about majors, minors, and teacher licensure programs.

For information about courses offered during a given academic term, visit the Elon OnTrack site. By choosing Search for Sections, you can search for courses offered in a given semester including meeting times and instructor names. Education course descriptions from the Undergraduate Academic Catalog are listed below.

EDU 121. SCIENCE FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 4 sh

This course introduces dual licensure Elementary/Special Education majors to the core ideas in the physical, earth and atmospheric sciences. In addition to this disciplinary content, the course will provide an overview of National and State Science Learning Standards, K- 12 Science Education Practices, and Crosscutting Concepts. For Elementary/Special Education dual licensure majors only. Offered fall or spring.

EDU 211. SCHOOL AND SOCIETY 4 sh

This course is designed to introduce students to the cultural, social, historical, legal and philosophical foundations of education. Students examine critical issues that impact education in the 21st century. An integrated field experience enables students to analyze a variety of perspectives on the purposes of education and instructional practices related to classroom management, learning environment and meeting the needs of learners who are diverse in culture, language and ability. Students will develop skills in critical thinking, leadership, observing, interviewing, reading, writing and oral communications. May not take in the fall of the first-year at Elon. Offered fall, winter and spring.

EDU 241. GRAMMAR FOR EDUCATORS 2 sh

This course is designed specifically for potential teacher candidates who seek admission to teacher licensure programs housed within the School of Education. The course seeks to prepare emerging teachers with the writing skills necessary for communicating effectively with students, parents, colleagues, academic and professional communities and the public at large. Additionally, the course teaches English grammar as a knowledge base that both informs and improves the style of academic and professional writing. Potential teacher candidates shall demonstrate grammar competency for the purposes of being admitted to teacher education is they successfully complete this course. Offered fall and spring.

EDU 246. MATH AND SCIENCE FOR THE EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATOR 4 sh

This course integrates the two primary goals of (1) enhancing students’ personal comfort with and aptitude for mathematical and scientific concepts, and (2) providing students with the knowledge and skills needed to support learning of math and science in everyday early childhood sociocultural contexts. Topics include acquisition and development of concepts such as number, measurement, spatial reasoning, and hypothesis generation. Offered spring

EDU 281 IS. Comparative Issues in Education-Costa Rica and Beyond 4 sh

Every society has a complex set of social, economic, cultural and political factors that contribute to the form and meaning of educational institutions. This course will focus on the educational structures in Costa Rica: historical background, organization and governance, funding, teacher preparation, social realities, contemporary issues and the future of education in the country. Offered in Costa Rica. Prerequisite: EDU 211 or SOC 243.

EDU 295. RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION 4 sh

This course examines the methods used to conduct education research. Emphasis is placed on the use of research in education settings from early childhood to secondary education. The course acquaints students with a general theoretical understanding of research, practical aspects of conducting research, and ethical and diversity considerations inherent in the proper implementation of research. Prerequisite: MTH 110 or 220. Offered fall.

EDU 298. CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 4 sh

This course is a study of children’s literature as a basis for meaningful learning experiences and for stimulating a love of reading in elementary-grade students. It will explore a broad range of reading materials in various genres and formats and help the student learn to assess the components of worthy, developmentally appropriate literature. Over the course of this semester, a student will become familiar with popular authors and illustrators, while considering ways to excite children’s interest in reading. Students will be asked to respond deeply and critically to their own reading experiences in order to understand how children’s literature can connect with its audience and illuminate and enhance any course of study. Although this is NOT a methods or a reading course, future teachers will begin to develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to use books effectively with children. This course does not fulfill the Core Curriculum Literature requirement. Prerequisite: EDU 211 or SOC 243 or permission of instructor.

EDU 310. ASSESSMENT AND EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES
FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS 8 sh

This course focuses on assessment and curriculum development for infants and toddlers with and without developmental delays. Students learn how to plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate learning environments and experiences. Emphasis is placed on natural settings and authentic methods for assessing development, and students learn about evidence-based practices and decision-making for facilitating development. Particular attention is paid to the role that sociocultural context plays in young children’s emergent math and literacy skills. Partnering with families to promote children’s development is an underlying tenet of this course. A concurrent practicum offers opportunities to apply concepts and skills. Prerequisites: PSY 245, EDU 211, EDU 295, and admission to the teacher education program. Offered spring

EDU 311. PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND TEACHING I:
LANGUAGE ARTS AND SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS AND MATERIALS 8 sh

Students learn how to investigate, evaluate and select content, methods and materials used in organizing and teaching language arts and social studies in elementary school. They develop appropriate curricula and examine personal beliefs and dispositions. They design and implement differentiated lessons based on state standards and develop technology-enhanced, project-based learning units. They gain a sound pedagogical knowledge base, an understanding of the importance of inquiry and professionalism and have opportunities to participate in a community of learners. A concurrent practicum offers opportunities to apply concepts and skills. Prerequisites: EDU 211, PSY 321, CIS 220. Corequisites: EDU 323, 315 and admission to teacher education program. To be taken no earlier than junior year. Offered fall and spring.

EDU 312. PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND TEACHING I:
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE METHODS AND MATERIALS 8 sh

Students learn how to investigate, evaluate and select content, methods and materials used in organizing and teaching mathematics and science in the elementary school. They develop appropriate curricula and examine personal beliefs and dispositions. They design and implement differentiated lessons based on state standards and develop technology-enhanced, project-based learning units. They gain a sound pedagogical knowledge base, an understanding of the importance of inquiry and professionalism and have opportunities to participate in a community of learners. A concurrent practicum offers opportunities to apply concepts and skills. Prerequisites: EDU 211, MTH 208, 209, PSY 321, CIS 220. Corequisites: EDU 323, 315 and admission to teacher education program. To be taken no earlier than junior year. Offered fall and spring.

EDU 315. EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT 4 sh

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the purpose, use, and interpretation of educational assessments. Emphasis is placed on classroom assessment – monitoring progress, evaluating student products and performances, and constructing reliable measures of achievements. Consideration is also given to the interpretation and communication of both individual and aggregated assessment results. Prerequisite: EDU 211 or SOC 243, PSY 321. Offered fall and spring. Only Music Education majors have the option of 2-4 semester hours.

EDU 323. LITERACY DEVELOPMENT I: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 4 sh

This course involves the study of the fundamental processes by which a child learns to read both linear and nonlinear communication. Attention is given to readiness factors, vocabulary development, word attack, comprehension skills, assessment, writing and reading, interest in reading, the interrelatedness of all areas of the language arts to the reading process, and the integration of technology into the development of literacy. A variety of methodologies and instructional strategies are presented focusing on providing balanced reading instruction to meet diverse student strengths and needs including language experience, phonics, reading for meaning, literature circles, reading workshop, basal book, electronic book discussions, technology projects and monitoring reading progress. Prerequisites: EDU 211, PSY 321 and admission to the teacher education program or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EDU 311 or 312. Offered fall and spring.

EDU 324. LITERACY DEVELOPMENT II: STRATEGIES & INSTRUCTION
FOR STRUGGLING READERS 4 sh

The focus of this course is on planning and modifying elementary classroom instruction to address the needs of children who, for a variety of reasons, experience difficulty in acquiring basic literacy skills. Emphasis is placed on using assessment of children’s strengths and weaknesses to guide instructional decision making. Students practice administering a variety of diagnostic tools, interpreting the data and using the information to design and, when warranted, modify instruction. They acquire skills necessary to design explicit, systematic instruction in phonemic awareness, decoding, spelling, reading fluency, vocabulary, reading comprehension and writing. Prerequisites: EDU 211, PSY 321 and EDU 323, admission to the teacher education program or permission of instructor. Offered fall and spring.

EDU 325. MIDDLE GRADES LITERACY 4 sh

This course is designed to develop teacher candidates’ understanding of literacy in the middle grades. Participants will explore instructional approaches to support students in developing literacy skills and strategies with an emphasis on literacy in the content areas. Students will consider the theory and practice of adolescent literacy in the various disciplines and the fact in making appropriate choices in methods and materials for diverse student populations and support of struggling students. Current research of the developmental, cognitive and instructional best practices in the field is highlighted. A field based component will be incorporated in the class. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243 and admission to teacher education program. Offered fall of even years.

EDU 332. EARLY CHILDHOOD FAMILY-TEAM PARTNERSHIPS 4 sh

This course is an exciting opportunity for educators and other professionals who will be working with young children and families to gain the knowledge, competencies, and skills to create meaningful and enriching relationships with families, including those from diverse cultures. Whether you plan to work in education, human services, rehabilitation, or a nonprofit organization, knowledge of the social, political, economic, and cultural processes that affect families is essential. This course is designed to introduce students to critical issues that impact families, and to provide students with culturally relevant skills that will enable them to form effective family/community partnerships in schools and other work environments. Offered spring.

EDU 333. SUPPORTING EMOTIONAL AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 4 sh

This course is designed to help teachers and others who work on behalf of young children: (1) understand the importance of emotional and social well-being, and (2) support healthy emotional and social development for children from birth through kindergarten. Topics include attachment, body control and a positive self-image, play and imagination, discipline, empathy, emotion-regulation, and social competence. Emphasis is placed on preventing emotional and behavioral disorders through the development of early emotional and social skills. Offered fall.

EDU 342. FOUNDATIONS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 4 sh

This course addresses the evolution of the field of special education, its philosophical and theoretical foundations, legal underpinnings and current trends and controversies. Emphasis is on acquiring a broad knowledge base regarding the characteristics of students with exceptional learning needs and the process and procedures for providing special education. Consideration is given to how issues of human diversity impact families, cultures and schools and how these issues affect delivery of special education services. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243 and admission to the teacher education program. Offered fall.

EDU 345. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT FOR ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE GRADES 
AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CANDIDATES 4 sh

This course focuses on the important aspects of establishing a healthy, positive classroom environment that promotes academic growth as well as social development, for all school-age children and adolescents, including exceptional learners. Prerequisites: EDU 211 and admission to the teacher education program. Offered winter and spring.

EDU 355. TEACHING IN 21ST CENTURY CLASSROOMS 4 sh

This course examines critical issues in teaching in the contemporary secondary school, including literacy needs within content area classes and approaches to organizing and managing classroom environments. In order to better understand these and other problems of achievement and behavior, students will use collaborative teacher research methods to begin answering these highly contextualized problems of practice. This course provides an additional lens on the substantial field experience shared with content area methods classes. Prerequisite: SOC 243. Offered fall and spring.

EDU 401. EXPLORATIONS CAPSTONE SEMINAR I
for Early Childhood, Elem.& Special/Elem. 2 sh

This inquiry-based seminar is designed to give teacher candidates the necessary knowledge, skills, and dispositions to explore issues pertinent to effective citizenship in general, and education in particular, in the 21st century. The seminars provide opportunities for candidates from all Teacher Education programs to engage in wide-range reading, intensive writing, critical analysis, respectful debate and thoughtful discussion. The 401 seminar will familiarize teacher candidates with the School Improvement Plan (SIP) process and the concept of a Professional Learning Community (PLC), along with the facilitation of a PLC in order to demonstrate leadership and collaboration skills. Prerequisite: EDU 211. Offered fall.

EDU 402. EXPLORATIONS CAPSTONE SEMINAR I for Middle, K-12 & Secondary Majors 1 sh

This inquiry-based seminar is designed to give teacher candidates the necessary knowledge, skills, and dispositions to explore issues pertinent to effective citizenship in general, and education in particular, in the 21st century. The seminars provide opportunities for candidates from all Teacher Education programs to engage in wide-range reading, intensive writing, critical analysis, respectful debate and thoughtful discussion. The 402 seminar will familiarize teacher candidates with the School Improvement Plan (SIP) process and the concept of a Professional Learning Community (PLC), along with the facilitation of a PLC in order to demonstrate leadership and collaboration skills. Prerequisite: SOC 243. Offered fall.

EDU 403. EXPLORATIONS CAPSTONE SEMINAR II 2 sh

Students take part in a weekly seminar focused on supporting teaching, learning, completion of School of Education Evidences for NC licensure, and transition to the profession through reflection and inquiry. Panel presentations, speakers, video reflections, readings/discussions, and documentation of Evidences are key elements of the seminar. In this seminar, the virtual professional learning community (VPLC), designed in EDU 401/402 Explorations Capstone Seminars I or II, is implemented and/or completed. This course bridges the K-12 and university experience, offering opportunities to address the challenges and successes of student teaching. Co-requisite: EDU 481. Offered Spring.

EDU 410. ASSESSMENT AND EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES
FOR PRESCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN STUDENTS 8 sh

This course develops students’ knowledge and skills for assessing and teaching a wide range of children, including dual language learners and those with exceptionalities, in preschool and kindergarten. Students are taught how to use analysis of assessment data in the design of effective and developmentally appropriate instructional practices. Emphasis is placed on content and integration of curriculum for emergent mathematics, literacy, science, social studies, and the arts. The role of sociocultural context in learning is highlighted throughout the course. A concurrent practicum offers opportunities to apply concepts and skills. Prerequisite: EDU 310. Offered fall.

EDU 411. PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND TEACHING II:
LANGUAGE ARTS AND SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS AND MATERIALS 8 sh

Students learn how to investigate, evaluate and select content, methods and materials used in organizing and teaching language arts and social studies in the elementary school. They develop appropriate curricula and examine personal beliefs and dispositions. Building on knowledge acquired in PLT I, students design and implement integrated technology-enhanced, problem-based learning units, incorporating the elements of Universal Design (UD). National standards provide the context. They gain a more in-depth pedagogical knowledge base, a deeper understanding of the importance of inquiry and professionalism and have additional opportunities to participate in a community of learners. A concurrent practicum offers opportunities to apply concepts and skills. Prerequisite: EDU 312. Corequisite: EDU 401. Offered fall.

EDU 412. PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND TEACHING II:
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES METHODS AND MATERIALS 8 sh

Students learn to investigate, evaluate and select content, methods and materials used in organizing and teaching mathematics and science in the elementary school. They develop and implement appropriate curricula and examine personal beliefs and dispositions. Building on knowledge acquired in PLT I, students design and implement integrated technology-enhanced, problem-based learning units, incorporating the elements of Universal Design (UD). National standards provide the context. They gain a more in-depth pedagogical knowledge base, a deeper understanding of the importance of inquiry and professionalism and have additional opportunities to participate in a community of learners. A concurrent practicum offers opportunities to apply concepts and skills. Prerequisites: EDU 311 and admission to teacher education program. Corequisite: EDU 401. Offered fall.

EDU 421. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE GRADES AND SECONDARY ENGLISH 4 sh

In this study of the content and organization of the English curriculum with emphasis on methods and materials used in teaching literature, language skills and composition, students review print and nonprint media, create lesson and unit plans, lead classroom discussions and conduct teaching demonstrations. Public school classroom observation and assistance are required. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243, PSY 321. Offered fall semester.

EDU 422. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE GRADES AND SECONDARY MATHEMATICS 4 sh

A study of the objectives and organization of the mathematics curriculum and the instructional methods, tools, and assessment used in the teaching of mathematics in middle and high school grades. The guiding question in this course is: What (1) knowledge (math content for teaching, pedagogy & curriculum), (2) inquiry and professional skills and (3) dispositions are most needed for math teacher candidates to be able to learn from their own practice and teach effectively? Teacher candidates will develop intellectual habits of mind such as asking good questions, learning to use math manipulatives in algebra, geometry, and measurement effectively as instructional tools, and planning units and lessons focused on best practices with student learning in mind. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243, PSY 321. Offered fall semester.

EDU 424. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE GRADES AND SECONDARY SCIENCE 4 sh

Students develop, select and evaluate content, methods and materials used in teaching science at the middle- or high-school level. Study examines current trends in teaching the natural sciences and addresses safety concerns. Observations and practicum in middle and/or high schools required. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243, PSY 321. Offered fall semester of odd years.

EDU 425. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE GRADES AND SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES 4 sh

This study of the materials and methods of teaching social studies emphasizes planning, organization, objectives and evaluation. Public school practicum required. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243, PSY 321. Offered fall semester.

EDU 428. METHODS OF TEACHING WORLD LANGUAGES 4 sh

This study of the content and organization of the world languages curriculum in the public schools emphasizes methods and materials used in teaching at all levels (K-12) and covers how teaching the four basic skills and the target culture varies at each level. Students discuss theories of planning, instruction, choice of materials and evaluation, and gain practical experience by participating in a public school classroom. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243, PSY 321. Offered fall semester of odd years.

EDU 435. ASSESSMENT METHODS AND INTERPRETATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 4 sh

This course provides teacher candidates with knowledge required to design assessment plans for students with exceptional learning needs. Consideration is given to legal policies and ethical principles in regard to the administration and interpretation of assessment procedures. Candidates learn to evaluate standardized assessment instruments in terms of reliability, validity and adequacy of norm sample and to collaborate with families and other professionals to gather information and share assessment results. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243, admission to the teacher education program. Offered spring.

EDU 441. FOUNDATIONS OF MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION 4 sh

This course provides a foundation for middle level (6-9) education majors with concentrations in math, science, social studies and language arts. The course explores the unique physical, intellectual, social and personal characteristics of the young adolescent (age 10-14) with implication for curriculum development and instruction. Emphasis is on young adolescent learning needs, middle school philosophy and organization, classroom diversity with emphasis on students with limited English proficiency, responsive curriculum design and scholarly research related to issues of diversity, access to learning, and literacy; management of the learning environment; and professional leadership. Prerequisites: SOC 243, admission to the teacher education program. Offered spring.

EDU 442. EFFECTIVE MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHING 4 sh

This course is designed for middle grades majors (6-9) with concentration areas in math, science, social studies and language arts. The course builds upon and extends the foundational experiences in EDU 441 through in-depth exploration of theory as related to young adolescent learning; focused inquiry, collaboration and teaching on middle level interdisciplinary teams; service learning instructional design; scholarly research related to issues of diversity, access to learning, and literacy; and management of the learning environment and professional leadership. Prerequisite: EDU 441. Offered fall.

EDU 444. LANGUAGE AND LITERACY METHODS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 4 sh

In this course, teacher candidates become familiar with the theory and research base on effective instructional techniques for children with exceptional learning needs. They learn how to apply specific methods that involve explicit, systematic and intensive instruction to help children with learning difficulties acquire foundational skills in reading and language arts. Candidates learn to use curriculum-based assessment as a basis for planning, monitoring and modifying instruction. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243, EDU 323, admission to the teacher education program. Offered fall.

EDU 445. TEACHING/LEARNING STRATEGIES IN MATHEMATICS
AND CONTENT AREAS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATORS 4 sh

This course focuses on effective teaching and learning strategies for adolescents with mild to moderate learning needs. The course emphasizes strategies that reflect a cognitive/ metacognitive instructional approach to learning. Consideration is given to the use of technology as a tool for learning and to the assessment of strategy effectiveness by monitoring student progress. Teacher candidates learn to consider learning environments, cultural, linguistic and socioeconomic factors in addition to student abilities in their selection and use of strategies. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243 and admission to the teacher education program. Offered fall.

EDU 450. TEACHING DIVERSE LEARNERS IN MIDDLE AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS 4 sh

This course is designed to prepare middle grades and secondary teacher candidates to work effectively in today’s increasingly inclusive and diverse classrooms, providing historical, philosophical and practical approaches to issues surrounding five diversities: (1) racial, cultural and ethnic, (2) linguistic, (3) socioeconomic, (4) gender and (5) (dis)ability. A 30-hour field placement in a diverse secondary classroom provides real world experience for students to wrestle with assumptions, theories and data about how diversity impacts educational opportunity and student achievement. Prerequisite: SOC 243 (if seeking teaching licensure). Offered fall and spring.

EDU 451. TEACHING DIVERSE LEARNERS 4 sh

This course is designed to prepare elementary teacher candidates to work effectively in inclusive classrooms. Candidates gain historical and philosophical perspective to effectively instruct students from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds, religions, genders and abilities. Candidates gain knowledge of the Exceptional Children’s (EC) referral process and the skills to effectively teach EC and other diverse groups. Prerequisites: EDU 211 (if seeking teacher licensure). Offered fall and spring.

EDU 454. EARLY CHILDHOOD LANGUAGE AND LITERACY 4 sh

This course is a study of language and literacy development for a wide range of children, including dual language learners and those with exceptionalities. Emphasis is placed on scientific research and developmental theories for language acquisition and literacy learning, and on the relationship between oral language and the reading and writing process from birth through kindergarten. Prevention of reading difficulties is reviewed in detail. Prominence is given to cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives of literacy learning. Students learn to integrate language and literacy into the curriculum in authentic ways. Offered fall.

EDU 455. EARLY CHILDHOOD EXCEPTIONALITY 4 sh

This course provides an overview of special education for young children. Topics include legislation, referral, assessment, and service delivery. Students learn about various disabilities, research-based intervention practices, and inclusive and separate settings. The importance of a family systems approach for educating children from birth through kindergarten is highlighted, with particular emphasis on serving families from diverse backgrounds. Offered fall.

EDU 467. EARLY CHILDHOOD RESEARCH, POLICY AND PRACTICE 4 sh

This course focuses on connecting the science of early childhood development with the real world applications of program design and implementation. It includes an analysis of how federal, state, and local policies impact early childhood programs. Finally, this course acquaints students with the advocacy process as a means to influence policy decisions based on the science of early development. Offered winter.

EDU 481. STUDENT TEACHING 10 sh

Teacher candidates experience the classroom full time for one semester, with periodic conferences with the university supervisor(s) and classroom teacher(s). The student becomes acquainted with the duties and observes the methods and activities of an experienced teacher, with gradual induction into full-time teaching responsibilities. Prerequisites: EDU 211 or SOC 243 and grade(s) of C or better in appropriate methods course(s). Corequisite: EDU 403. Offered spring.

EDU 499. RESEARCH 1-4 sh

Students engage in undergraduate research under the direction of an education department faculty member. Maximum of eight semester hours total credit. Prerequisites: Eligibility as determined by the undergraduate research guidelines of Elon University and approval by the department.