Elementary Latin
I & II

3D Printing

History

3D Printing

Paths to Inquiry in the Arts & Sciences

Soldering tools, hot glue gun, vinyl cutter, and scissors

Scenic Design

Xacto knives, 3D printers, laser engravers, and more


Elementary Latin I & II  | LAT121 & LAT122

Instructor: Tedd Wimperis

Assignment Objectives

The main goals were to expand on the work we did in the class (an elementary language course) with a project that gave students a chance to look at Roman art and artifacts alongside our work with the language and to do a hands-on, collaborative project that let students use cool technology at a really valuable campus resource.

Deliverable

  • 3D print
  • Brief description/analysis the students wrote about their print
  • A public “museum exhibit” of all artifacts together, with their descriptions/analyses compiled into the “artifact guide”

Tools

Projects focused on the 3D printers; they chose a 3D model online and printed it at the Maker Hub

Materials

3D printer filament, paint

Why the Hub?

Working with the 3D printers at the Maker Hub introduced students to an exciting resource, and opened up more ways for them to engage with the material beyond our usual practice in class (using tech).

Success? Encore?

I would definitely consider the projects a success—the students really seem to enjoy them, per feedback on surveys I’ve given. The projects have become a regular fixture of those classes and generated some good buzz around campus and among colleagues at other institutions.


History

Instructor: Charles Irons

Assignment Objectives

Among the course goals that students addressed in their writing were an exploration of “The tremendous diversity of the enslaved experience, including an analysis of the variables responsible for that diversity” and “How men and women resisted their enslavement, through both open conflict and more subtle forms of resistance. Enslaved people rebelled, fled from slavery, maintained cultural practices distinct from those of slave owners, launched religious and political protest, etc.”

Deliverable

Students handled 3D printed objects (from files at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Virtual Curation Lab) and then did an informal writing assignment on what we can learn about the lives and experiences of enslaved people by attending to the material culture of US slavery. The ability to interact with reproductions of four items associated with US slavery (a pair of shackles, a hoe discovered in an archeological dig under a cabin used by enslaved people, a brick with the fingerprint of an enslaved worker on it, and a cowrie shell) was what the Hub offered.

Tools

3D printers

Materials

Plastic filament

Why the Hub?

I wanted to help jolt students out of hearing about slavery as a purely academic/intellectual phenomenon and to consider more intimately what life was like.

Success? Encore?

I would consider the project a success and would gladly do it again!

More Information


Scenic Design | THE361

Instructor: Natalie Hart

Course Objectives

In this course, students:

  • Translate textual analysis into meaningful visual imagery
  • Practice certain fundamental design skills with a focus on visual research, image, meaning and metaphor
  • Communicate through traditional and new technologies in drawing, drafting and model building

Deliverable

Students design and produce

  • 2 1/4-inch scale theatrical models with scenery. One is a single set show and one is a multi-set show
  • 1 small model piece using newer technology like the 3D printer
  • 1 piece using hand skills with a Xacto knife
  • 1 eighth-inch scale model that uses grayscale abstract scenery to evoke a given word

Tools

Students use Xacto knives, 3D printers, laser engravers, and more depending on their designs.

Materials

Students use matboard, foam core, glue, Bristol board, plastic filament, and more depending on their designs

Why the Hub?

The Maker Hub provides the tools and materials needed for my course with an appropriate place to do the work. Prior to the maker hub, students had to spend money on these projects and do them in their residences which are not equipped for this work.

Success? Encore?

Definitely! I have taught this course every other year for 11 years. Having the Maker Hub as a resource has been a huge help to my students and more easily lets them accomplish learning objectives.


Paths to Inquiry in the Arts & Sciences | ECF111

Instructor: Heather Lindenman

Assignment Objectives

We visited the Maker Hub with two goals in mind. The first was to show that research inquiries and interests can stem from many life experiences, including “making.” The visit was one of 20+ experiential “PANDAs” (PANdemic Engagement Activities) we offered to students during four days in the middle of winter term. The second goal was to build community among the College Fellows, to give them a chance to get out and participate together in an activity with fellow students. This in itself was not insignificant, particularly during COVID.

Deliverable

Students chose their projects based on their own interests. They later composed a reflection about their experience at the Maker Hub and used their experiences there to brainstorm potential research questions they could pursue for their class “grant proposal” assignment.

Tools

Soldering tools, hot glue gun, vinyl cutter, and scissors

Materials

Students used the materials provided in the kits by Dan and the undergrad student leaders.

Why the Hub?

As the Arts and Humanities faculty member in ECF111, I wanted to have students visit and use the Maker Hub to show how creativity and “making” span disciplines and areas of study: creativity and active “making” aren’t reserved for creative writers, art majors, and theater studies folks (for instance). Creativity spans branches of the arts and sciences, and we see that at play at the Maker Hub.

Success? Encore?

Yes! It was great! Several students stayed behind to create more than one project, and students’ reflections showed that the experience was enjoyable and thought-provoking for them. Many said they are eager to visit the Maker Hub again in the future. Some said that the act of “making” was relaxing or meditative or that they were surprised how long it had been since they had “made” anything.

More Information