School of Communication

Guiding students to think, write and produce

meaningful information in a digital and global age

By Dean Paul Parsons

Dean Parsons stands behind a podium in New York City.Thousands of years ago, our ancestors began to speak, draw and write as ways of communicating. That was, broadly speaking, the first communications revolution.

Five hundred years ago, Gutenberg invented movable type, allowing mass production of texts. No longer would learning be restricted to the elite. The availability of common texts and the rise in literacy constituted the second communications revolution.

Now we send words, sounds and images around the globe in the blink of an eye through satellites, cables the Internet and mobile media. Our technology is overcoming time and distance — the third communications revolution.

This change is happening so rapidly, and we adjust to change so continually, that we may not feel we're in the midst of revolution. But we are.

At Elon, we embrace the transforming nature of living in a digital and global age, while keeping our focus on the unchanging need for meaningful content. Whatever the technology, wherever the audience, our world needs good ideas and good information.

The role of Elon's School of Communications is to guide students to think, write and produce meaningful information in a digital and global age.

If you're able to overcome time and distance yourself, we invite you to visit Elon's beautiful campus and the nationally accredited School of Communications.